Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats

Veterinary reviewed by: Dr. Linda Simon, MVB MRCVS

Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

Veterinary reviewed by: Dr. Linda Simon, MVB MRCVS

Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

What is Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat?

You may hear your veterinarian call a foreign body stuck in your cat's throat an esophageal obstruction, gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction, pharyngeal obstruction or airway obstruction. All of these terms simply mean your cat has swallowed an object that is too large to pass through the GI tract or has become trapped in the respiratory tract.

Cats inspect the world around them with their tongues and mouths. This habit can sometimes get your feline friend into trouble and threaten her health. Sometimes a cat eats an object that is too large to pass through her upper digestive tract, namely her esophagus. These foreign bodies can become lodged in the esophagus or airway, obstructing digestion or airflow. A foreign body can also cause inflammation or injury to the esophagus or airway, leading to pain and discomfort. If you fear your cat has a foreign object trapped in the throat, visit a veterinarian right away. Depending on the size and location of the object, an esophageal or pharyngeal blockage can be a life-threatening condition. 

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Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat Average Cost

From 341 quotes ranging from $500 - $2,000

Average Cost

$1,000

Symptoms of Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats

Cats with foreign bodies lodged in their throats will behave differently depending on whether the airway or esophagus is blocked. A cat with an esophageal obstruction may exhibit one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Hypersalivation
  • Gagging
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Regurgitation
  • Attempts at swallowing
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Hiding away 

If your cat's esophagus is only partially obstructed, the signs may be less noticeable. Symptoms of partial esophageal obstruction in cats include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Lethargy
  • Inflammation or infection of the esophagus
  • Pneumonia
  • A bad smell from the mouth

A cat with an obstructed airway might exhibit any of the following symptoms:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Breathing loudly
  • Choking
  • Panicked behaviour
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Causes of Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats

Typically, a cat suffering from this type of obstruction has purposefully licked, swallowed or otherwise ingested the foreign body. You may even have seen your cat swallow the offending object. Some toys, especially yarn or string, can be swallowed by your cat during playtime. Food may also obstruct your cat's airway if she eats too quickly or fails to chew properly. Only diagnostic procedures performed by your veterinarian are sufficient to determine what type of foreign body has become stuck in your cat's throat. 

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Diagnosis of Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats

Your veterinarian will need to perform chest and neck x-rays in order to diagnose your cat's partial or complete obstruction. Signs that the object is obstructing the lower respiratory tract, such as coughing or trouble breathing, will lead a veterinarian to x-ray your cat's chest. If your veterinarian suspects the upper respiratory tract and upper airways are obstructed, he or she may use a scope as part of the physical examination. These tools make it easier for your veterinarian to locate the foreign body. 

Foreign bodies lodged in the GI tract are usually visible with a typical head or chest x-ray if they are made from a material that shows up on x-rays, such as a needle or bone. If your veterinarian cannot locate the foreign body on an x-ray, he or she may perform a contrast esophagram, where your cat swallows a radioactive dye to assist with imaging. An esophagoscopy, whereby your veterinarian will feed a scope, or camera, down your sedated cat's esophagus to visualize the foreign body, may be performed. A scope can also be used to examine any esophageal tearing or irritation caused by the foreign body. 

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Treatment of Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats

Your veterinarian's first priority when treating a foreign object stuck in the throat of your cat will be to retrieve the object as soon as possible. If the foreign body is trapped in the upper esophagus or upper respiratory tract, it can be removed through the mouth using endoscopy and forceps or using a balloon catheter, depending on its shape and size. If the foreign body is particularly dangerous or sharp, an endogastric tube can be fed through your cat’s mouth to shield the esophagus while the foreign body is retrieved. 

If it is too dangerous or difficult to remove the foreign body through your cat's mouth, your veterinarian may choose to push the object into her stomach where it can pass through the remaining GI tract safely or be removed surgically via an exploratory laparotomy. An airway obstruction can also be encouraged to dislodge itself with flushing of the respiratory tract with lubricating secretions. If none of these retrieval methods are appropriate, your cat may require surgery to remove the foreign body. This surgery is fairly common and generally safe, with a 93% recovery rate. 

If your cat's esophagus has been injured or inflamed by the foreign body, treatment of the esophagitis, or irritation, may be required. Anti-inflammatory and pain medications can relieve discomfort while your cat heals. 

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Worried about the cost of Foreign Objects Stuck In Throat treatment?

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Recovery of Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat in Cats

Once the foreign body is removed, cats generally recover quickly. Still, it is important to schedule a follow-up appointment with your veterinarian to ensure your cat is not suffering from chronic esophagitis, pain, or infection. Injury and irritation diagnosed at follow up may require medication or other treatments. If persistent, you may need to provide your cat with a diet of softer foods and small, frequent meals to calm irritation. Depending on the severity of the abrasions, antibiotics may be required to prevent infection of the damaged tissue. 

As previously mentioned, the rate of recovery following one of these obstructions is high and requires little ongoing management beyond close supervision of your cat's eating habits. 

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Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat Average Cost

From 341 quotes ranging from $500 - $2,000

Average Cost

$1,000

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Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Persian

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4months

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0 found helpful

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0 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Spine Stuck In Throat

Please help

Sept. 25, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I apologize for the delay, this venue is not set up for urgent emails. I hope that your pet is feeling better. If they are still having problems, It would be best to have your pet seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get any testing or treatment taken care of that might be needed.

Oct. 21, 2020

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Grey tiger cat

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Three Years

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0 found helpful

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0 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Has A Bur From His Fur Stuck In Throat

Our house cat goes outside sometimes and gets burs stuck in his fur. It seems he got one stuck in this throat and coughs a few times an hour to try to get it out. It has been about 12 hours of this cough. Does he need to see a vet? He is otherwise eating and drinking just fine b

Aug. 2, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I do think that it would be best to have your cat seen by a veterinarian, yes. Coughing for that long could be a problem for him, and there may be something else going on besides one of the burrs in his throat. Your veterinarian will be able to examine him and see what might be going on, and suggest treatment for him. I hope that all goes well for him.

Aug. 2, 2020

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Foreign Objects Stuck in the Throat Average Cost

From 341 quotes ranging from $500 - $2,000

Average Cost

$1,000

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