Involuntary Muscle Trembling Average Cost

From 480 quotes ranging from $200 - 3,000

Average Cost

$1,000

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What is Involuntary Muscle Trembling?

Involuntary muscle trembling, officially known as fasciculation, describes a condition in which muscles tremble, twitch, or spasm uncontrollably. This can occur in cats and other companion animals for various reasons. Muscle trembling normally occurs in response to irritants or emotions and is not necessarily related to any medical condition. It is also possible that trembling or twitching is caused by a genetic condition and is untreatable, but not dangerous. In some cases, fasciculation occurs as a symptom of another disease or disorder. Some medical conditions that cause muscle trembling can be severe and may be life-threatening. If muscle trembling continues, seek medical attention. 

Symptoms of Involuntary Muscle Trembling in Cats

Involuntary muscle trembling can take many forms. The trembling can occur rapidly with the movements happening in quick succession, or it may occur at a slower pace often described as twitching. The fasciculation may also be localized, meaning it only affects a certain part of the body. Localized trembling or twitching in cats most commonly affects the head or hind legs. The muscle trembling could also be general, meaning it affects the entire body. In both localized and generalized trembling the movement may be persistent or episodic. Additional, seemingly unrelated, symptoms may also be observed depending on the underlying cause of the fasciculation. 

Symptoms Include:

  • Uncontrolled trembling or twitching
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • Repetitive pawing or scratching
  • Pain and vocalizations that are related to pain

Causes of Involuntary Muscle Trembling in Cats

Various conditions may cause involuntary muscle trembling as a symptom, or there may be no discernable cause. It is possible for the twitching or trembling to simply be part of your pet’s normal response to certain stimuli in their environment or to be an emotionally-triggered response. Involuntary trembling can also be a primary condition, rather than a symptom of something else. Some of the potential causes for involuntary muscle trembling in cats and other companion animals include:

  • Nervous system disorder
  • Kidney failure
  • Certain medications
  • Toxicity or poisoning
  • Injury or trauma
  • Strong emotional responses like excitement, fear, or anxiety
  • Deep or REM sleep stages
  • Itchiness from dry skin, mites, or fleas
  • Low blood calcium
  • Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar
  • Vitamin or mineral deficiencies
  • Electrolyte imbalances
  • Rabies
  • Seizure disorders like epilepsy
  • Feline hyperesthesia or rolling skin disease
  • Congenital or genetic conditions
  • Pain
  • Weakness
  • Certain cancers, especially those affecting the nervous system or muscles

Diagnosis of Involuntary Muscle Trembling in Cats

Various diagnostic techniques may be needed to determine what is causing the trembling or twitching. Your veterinarian will begin with a full physical examination and medical history. You should discuss any symptoms you have observed, including how frequent the trembling occurs and which portions of the cat’s body are affected. If the fasciculation is episodic and does not occur all the time, a video recording of the trembling may aid your veterinarian in forming a diagnosis. Veterinary staff will take samples of your cat’s blood and urine for laboratory analysis. The blood sample will be tested for blood cell counts, biochemistry and electrolyte panels, and antibodies that might indicate an infection. Urinalysis and analysis for proper kidney function will be checked using the urine sample. Additional diagnostic methods, including x-rays or other imaging techniques, may be needed to diagnose your pet properly. 

Treatment of Involuntary Muscle Trembling in Cats

The treatment method used by your veterinarian will be determined by their diagnosis of the underlying cause of the fasciculation. These treatments can vary widely depending on the condition causing the trembling and may include surgery, medications, or other methods. If no cause is determined, treatment may be prescribed to aid in a reduction of the trembling. Some of the common treatments used for muscle trembling include:

Muscle Relaxants

Drugs in this category are designed to relax muscles, which may help reduce or eliminate the tremors. This treatment must be properly dosed for your pet’s size and physical condition to reduce the risk of side effects. If a medical condition has been determined to be the cause of the trembling, this treatment method may not be used. 

Supplementation 

If a deficiency or imbalance is the cause of the trembling, your veterinarian may recommend supplementation to restore the cat’s nutrient balance. This treatment method is relatively low risk but requires monitoring to make sure levels remain in balance. 

Anti-Depressants or Anti-Anxiety Medications

If the cause is determined to be psychosomatic, medications designed to improve mental state may be recommended. Proper dosing is needed with this type of treatment to minimize the risk of side effects. 

Recovery of Involuntary Muscle Trembling in Cats

The prognosis for recovery will depend on the underlying cause of the muscle trembling. If no cause is determined, the prognosis for management is good. Trembling may never go away in these cases, but it is still possible for your pet to live a normal life. If the underlying cause is treatable, most cats will make a full recovery as long as they respond well to treatment. Certain causes of involuntary muscle trembling, like kidney failure or some cancers, are both untreatable and life-threatening. In these cases, recovery may not be possible. In any case, your care and support will benefit your pet. 

Involuntary Muscle Trembling Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Bella
Mix
7 months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My kitten is about 7 months old. She hasn't had any issues until now. Today she just starting kicking her rear leg and front leg like as if there was something stuck to it. She'll get comfortable for a little bit then it'll twitch and she has to move cause it bothers her. What could cause this

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
This twitching may or may not be normal behaviour, but if it is disturbing her it may be due to a few different issues which may include spinal disorders, cerebellar developmental disorders, infections among other causes. You should keep an eye on things to see if the twitching decreases in severity or it gets worse and other symptoms develop; if you have concerns you should visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Eli and Bella
Siamese kittens
Approximately 8 weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Shaking their back legs when they

My to 8 week old kittens had ringworm and I treated them with over the counter medication for humans then I treated them with new stock sulfur and after the treatments now that they're walking around there shaking their back legs did I poison them by any chance are they got into toxicity I just wash them again with clean water and their comforting but I'm afraid for them what do I do

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
It depends on which product you used on them, there are many suitable medicated shampoos available over the counter at pet shops so human medications are not necessary. I would check the ingredients on medication you used and search to see if they are safe for cats; you could also call the Pet Poison Helpline and tell them the product you used and they can tell you what to do next (may involve just visiting your Veterinarian for treatment). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com

Muscle spasams stopped thank you!!

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Pouncer
Bengal
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My 11 year old Bengal started having mild twitches in his head about a year or two ago, they were minor and his behaviour was normal so I didn't think much of it. However, they have been getting worse in the last week, with him not being able to walk because it was shaking from his shoulders up this morning. He usually only pees inappropriately when he is upset and had peed on a jacket on the couch yesterday morning. I've been using the pretty litter and it has been mostly normal, with one day of it showing a bit of blue a week or two ago. He was on some pretty heavy experimental medication for a little over a year when he was a kitten due to some serious GI issues, but has been healthy ever since. His diet has been very strict since his GI issues came under control and he eats only the ProPlan indoor turkey formula and the fancy feast chunky chicken and turkey, with occasional treats of plain chicken or turkey. He is a stictly indoor cat and the only new thing to be added to the house lately is a live christmas tree. I don't have a lot of extra money at the moment and can't afford a round of expensive tests, so is this something that could be easily addressed or is it likely that it would involve extensive testing for a high probability that there is no treatment?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Some tremors are not unusual in cats as they age past ten years old, but if the tremors are getting too severe that it is affecting his movement you should consider at a minimum a kidney function test to determine if the cause of the tremors is down to kidney issues. Some tremors are attributable to aging and are idiopathic (we don’t know why) but sometimes they are due to more serious causes; it would be wise to have an examination and blood test to rule out the common causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Barney
Bengal
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Muscle Tremors

Medication Used

Anodip benazapet
Anodip

My 2 year old bengal cat has kidney disease and only 1 kidney. He has started having very bad tremors and shivering but is still active and eating. My vet is unsure what is causing it and says it's probably the disease. Have touch any ideas?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Trembling is a common result of kidney failure and isn’t uncommon in these cases; kidney failure can cause an increase in phosphorus in the blood which may lead to trembling. A blood test should be taken to monitor progress of the kidney as well as phosphorus levels. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/excess-phosphorus-blood

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Kitty
tabby
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lymph nodes swollen
Lymph nodes swollen, twitching hindegs

My cat got into a fight with another cat which causes a cyst to form above his eye. I could push the hook out of his eyeball. I got it clipped and flushed out but I noticed his lymph nodes behind his ears were swollen. It's been an month and he was on antibiotics and they are still swollen and every other night he is having spasms in his hind legs. He can't seem to stay comfortable and it lasts all night. He's very lethargic also.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
It would be best to return Kitty to your Veterinarian for another examination as well as possibly taking a fine needle aspirate of the enlarged lymph nodes; the lymph nodes may be enlarged due to infection, inflammation among other cases. I cannot think of a direct relationship between the eye injury and the twitching of the hind legs, you should discuss this with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Precious
Long-haired Domestic
8 Weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Back leg spasms

I accidentally stepped on my 8 week old kitten while cleaning and her backs legs started to spasm, she ended up pooping herself and I feel like such a horrible person as I caused the injury and I don't have the money to see a vet just yet :( she's lying down in one spot, hadn't eaten or drank and I'm so worried

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
In these cases, it is important to visit a Veterinarian as soon as possible since the extent of the injury cannot be determined without an examination; if your full weight went on to Precious then there may also be internal injuries as well. You should visit a charity clinic or any nonprofit which may be able to help as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.aaha.org/pet_owner/lifestyle/cant-afford-critical-veterinary-care-many-nonprofits-can-help!.aspx

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Nathan
Half Bengal/Half Tabby
16 Years
Mild condition
-1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

hind legs tremble a little

My 16 year old neutered male is in Stage 2 of CKD and in the past six months, his hind legs tremble a little when I pick him up. He is on Buprenephrine & Adequan for treatment of severe arthritis. Can the trembling be part of CKD? I do know that his pain is under control, so it is not that.

Thank you.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Tremors may be an indicator of renal failure in cats, also Nathan may still be in pain regardless of medication if not given at an adequate dose. Given his age and his current kidney condition, you should visit your Veterinarian for a once over and a blood test to check his kidney values. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

We just had a vet visit a week ago and all labs done at that time. Paid meds given every eight hours, and I am here at home with him to ensure pain control is met (i.e., dosage adjusted as required). Answer not helpful.

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Spike
American Shorthair
3 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My cat vomitted 6 times and some of them look like pate and the rest is a yellow liquid. His legs shake sometimes and I dont know what to do. This is the first time he has this situation.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
It is not unusual for a kitten to have a bout of vomiting, the pate looking vomit would be digested food and the yellow liquid would be from an empty stomach. Try to offer small portions of food to encourage Spike to eat and if you haven’t already make sure that he is wormed. If you see no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination; also if Spike isn’t vaccinated you should start that too, regardless of whether he is an indoor only cat or not. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bubba
Manx
7 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My cat has started having random muscle spasms. His behavior isn’t changing but he starts moving around as if they are causing him discomfort. He is not making any noise to indicate pain. He responded with happy meows when food was mentioned and when he saw the laser pointer (his favorite toy). He was purring at first but then stops. He has also started showing a lot of dandruff, which may or may not be related to the shaking. Tonight is the first time that I noticed the tremors as well. Please help!

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Some cats may develop tremors as they age but without performing a thorough physical examination I cannot say for sure whether the cause is idiopathic or part of something more serious (tumours, infections, neurological disease, poisoning). You should have your Veterinarian examine Bubba so that other possible causes are ruled out. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Takoda
tabby
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

I was petting my cat last night. He is turning 11 years old, is obese (25 pounds) and may be suffering from arthritis in his joints as well. Whilst I was pettig his head, neck and chest, i noticed him nod his head up and down seemingly involuntarily. Does this mean we should keep a closer eye on him? Maybe bring him to our vet? I'm not sure if we should be worried about him or not. Is this action common in cats his age and weight? Thank you for reading this and thank you in advance for the advice and or help.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Idiopathic head bobbing is not unusual in older cats; but should be differentiated by your Veterinarian from other causes including head trauma, neck injury, vestibular disorders among other causes. To settle on an idiopathic diagnosis would be irresponsible without ruling out other causes first. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Harley
domestic short hair
14 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

I have a cat that's about 14 years old. At times when he stands his front legs are shaking. There is no shaking in the back legs nor when he's sleeping or laying down. I've noticed his head at times has a fine tremor. What could this be?? Other than this he has food allergies and we have him on a limited ingredient diet.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Head tremors in old cats are not uncommon and may be caused by cerebellar disorders, focal seizures, trauma, inflammation, drug side effects among other causes; sometimes the cause may be just age related with no detectable cause. Your Veterinarian should examine Harley and given his age a blood test would be useful just to see how his internal organs are functioning. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Silke
Birman, Female
2 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Irritation when touched
Cramps
Pain when touched

Medication Used

N/A

Hi
I have a Birman female cat, and she's been having irritation/pain on both back legs when touched/petted to the point of biting me or the one petting her there.
After that is followed a session of licking her self on the inside of her thighs or tips of her feet, where ever the irritation/pain might be which seems to affect the whole leg or legs. She dosent have a problem being touched around her tail, and she's sometimes okay with me hold her leg out doing a natural cat leg stretch. Brushing her legs is sometimes okay, but not always, then she gets irritated and tries to bite/scratch me.

She also has Cramps on both back legs,(the right more than the left) when laying/sitting in a postion that triggers it(not sure about the precise critera's.
It comes in periods at least once every two days.

She's almost 2 years old now, and she's been having the problem for 1½ years, after she got spayed or in the period following that. (Spayed @ 6 months old)
Im not sure if its related, its not getting worse, its just been there all this time, and it dosen't seem pleasnt for her to be petted there or in general.

She's been to the vet 1 year ago, the vet tried to stretch her legs to relieve any problems, I didnt get any futher instuctions or answers about what it could be if it didnt help.

Otherwise she's in good health. She's an Inndoor Cat. And gets lots of playtime, around 2-3 hours a day, running etc. without showing any problems. Its only when im petting her it seems worst.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
It is possible that Silke has something like twitch-skin syndrome or hyperaesthesia where skin sensitivity in certain areas may lead to twitching of the area and excessive licking and grooming which affects breeds originating around the same geographical area. Ideally, I would visit a Feline Specialist to discuss Silke’s symptoms and to determine if any treatment is necessary. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thanks for the response dr.
For a little more info, the cramps she's having is exacly like the one in this video: https://youtu.be/HZR6gCqQ1VE?t=14

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Sorin
Domestic medium haired tuxedo
7 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Hello I have a 7monto old kitten.
He has been fine since he was given to me some months back.
Today after I came home he was shaking uncontrollable. I've checked his feet, neck is tense , his belly is a little hard, ive checked his pupils and they are fine. I know animals are good aT hiding pain, it's hard to tell if he is in pain, his meow sounds the samr and when ib touch hI'm he reacts as norMal folower by purring. He is a indoor cat. I don't have money currently or a way to make it to a vet. Do you have any ideas as to what can be causing this? I'm extremely worried.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
There are various causes for tremors to occur in cats which may include neurological disorders, infections, parasites, poisoning, trauma, cerebellar abiotrophy among other disorders. Without an examination I cannot say for certain what a cause may be, I would suggest looking out for a charity clinic or a non-profit which may be able to help with all or some of the cost. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cuddles
Tuxedo
16+
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

head twitching drooling weight loss

Medication Used

none

My cat is 16, she lost a lot of weight in a short amount of time, always yelling and pacing. Lately I'm noticing her head twitching here and there. She drinks a lot of water. Now she is peeing around the house, she does go to the box but sometimes she doesn't. Oh yeah she is drooling to.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
There are a few different causes for the symptoms which you are describing which may include dental disorders, poisoning, liver disease (hepatic encephalopathy), kidney failure, head trauma among other causes; given Cuddles age, it would be best to have her checked over by her Veterinarian and to have a routine blood test taken to check her internal internal health. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Onyx
Shorthair
14 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

MY cat was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism about two and a half weeks ago. SHe is 14 and in great health the doctor said. They prescribed her medication and she seemed to get better. Before she was constantly vomiting. While taking it at first her symptoms subsided and she seemed better. Now she is breathing strange, raspy sound and she is throwing up multiple times a day. She has no interest in food or water and her head randomly twitches. It’s hard to explain but she will just have a spasm and then go back to being normal.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
There are a few different treatments for hyperthyroidism in cats but since you didn’t mention which treatment Onyx is receiving I’ll assume it is methimazole (or similar); the most common side effects of methimazole are vomiting and loss of appetite. There are other side effects which may affect the muscles and nerves but is uncommon; I would recommend you visit your Veterinarian for a follow up of the efficacy of this treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/vth/Documents/pharmacy-methimazole.pdf

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Rollo
Serengeti cross
23-24 weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My 3 kittens were neutered (castrated) on Tues. They are 23 weeks old and all went well I beleive. They were also microchipped at the time also. However 3 days later, the smaller kitten/cat has a foul odour coming from his mouth and also I noticed a spasm type thing going on with his tounge/mouth upon him waking, when he was yawning which was quite startling to witness. He has also been sticking his tounge out slightly since the operation - something he didnt do before. Hes eating and playing, racing about the house etc. he is the more nervous one and hope it may be just a result of the anesthetic and will stop. I mentioned this to our vets and thats what they mentioned it may be - a reaction to the drugs.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
If Rollo had an endotracheal tube placed, his throat would have been sprayed with a local anaesthetic to prevent vomiting; there may be still some issue from this procedure. It is just a case of keeping an eye on him and looking for improvement, I cannot think of anything to suggest what may be the cause other than that. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Gizmo
Domestic medium haired
14 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

My cat is twitching today, but was fine yesterday. The only problem is that he was having a hard time walking, but yesterday he walked and went to the bathroom without my help.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Twitching is a very vague symptoms on its own and may be part of numerous conditions, given Gizmo’s age and the fact she is having a hard time walking I would be thinking about liver issues; infections, trauma, poisoning and tumours may all cause walking trouble and twitching. If the issue continues, it would be best to visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My cat's head unvoluntary intermittently and is getting more pronounced all the time. The vet said I need to do a 700.00 Ultra Sound to find out, I can't afford that what else can be done

Thank you I'm going to take him to the vet

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