Joint Dislocation Average Cost

From 412 quotes ranging from $200 - 1,000

Average Cost

$500

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What is Joint Dislocation?

Joints are held together with tendons and ligaments. When these are also damaged, the dislocation is referred to as luxation. Subluxation refers to dislocation with no damage to these surrounding parts. Hip dislocation, from hip dysplasia or from injury, along with a luxating patella (sliding knee cap) are among the most common dislocations seen in cats. Elbow luxation and tail dislocation are also seen on a lesser scale. Joint dislocations are paired most commonly with other serious injuries from trauma. It is imperative to get your cat immediate veterinary care in situations of trauma, as the injuries can be life threatening.

A joint is the point at which two or more bones meet, often allowing movement of body parts. The three types of joints, fibrous, cartilaginous and synovial pivot joints, can become pulled apart or moved out of alignment, causing dislocation. Joints that allow movement are at a greater risk than ones that do not. The joints that allow movement are categorized as hinge, saddle and ball, and socket joints.

Symptoms of Joint Dislocation in Cats

Often the first symptom of trauma is your cat's disappearance for a long period of time, even lasting days, in some cases. A serious injury usually makes it difficult for the cat to return home. Inspect your cat upon its return for any possible injuries. Other symptoms to watch for are:

  • Pain
  • Holding limb up while walking
  • Limited or abnormal movement
  • Limping
  • Tenderness
  • Swelling
  • Decrease in muscle around affected joint
  • Bent limb
  • Deformed joint
  • No toe sensation

Causes of Joint Dislocation in Cats

By far, the most common cause of joint dislocation in cats is injury. Small children should be encouraged to be gentle with cats, as rough play often results in dislocation and other injuries to the cat.

Known causes include:

  • Falling from a great height
  • Being hit by an automobile
  • Being stepped on by a human
  • Tail or limb being pulled by a human
  • Fighting with another animal
  • Having a body part shut in a door (often the tail)
  • Congenital disorder (such as hip dysplasia)

Diagnosis of Joint Dislocation in Cats

Upon arrival to a veterinary clinic or animal hospital, the vet will complete a careful physical exam, evaluating the extent of the injury. They may note a grinding of the dislocated joint. X-rays will be needed to ensure that no other life-threatening trauma to the body is present, especially in the case of an altercation with a vehicle. 

A complete blood profile, biochemical profile, and urinalysis will be taken to assess the cat's overall condition. If surgery will be needed, X-rays of the chest will be required before anesthetic can be administered to ensure the cat will respond appropriately.

Treatment of Joint Dislocation in Cats

The treatment for joint dislocation depends very much on the location and severity of the dislocation itself. There are surgical and nonsurgical options available, mostly contingent on the amount of time that has passed since the joint was moved out of place.

Joint Manipulation 

If the dislocation has happened within three days of the veterinary visit and the severity is not too extreme, the vet may be able to use physical force to put the joint back into place. The cat will be under general anesthetic for the process as it is quite painful. An X-ray will be performed after the manipulation to verify that alignment has been corrected. Only a professional should attempt this procedure. The cat may be bandaged or otherwise immobilized while the joint heals, lasting anywhere from four to fourteen days. Cage rest may be required if the dislocation was in the hip joint. 

Surgery 

For severe dislocations, dysplasia, or dislocations where much time has passed, extensive surgery may be needed. This often includes the implantation of steel pins and screws, some which need surgical removal after the healing process. Fluoroscopy may be used to reduce incision size, but some cases require very large incisions. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often prescribed after surgery to reduce inflammation. Antibiotics may also be prescribed for two to four weeks post surgery to stave off infection. 

Medication

In both surgical and nonsurgical treatments of joint dislocation, painkillers are often prescribed to help the cat get through the first few painful days of healing. It is not recommended for painkillers to be prescribed for a long period of time in the occurrence of joint dislocation.

Recovery of Joint Dislocation in Cats

At-home care will continue for as long as the cat is healing, which can range from three weeks to two months. If bandages have been applied, inspect them daily to ensure they are clean and dry. A comfortable, soft bed should be supplied to prevent the cat from developing bed sores. If the jaw was dislocated, soft foods will be needed throughout the healing process. The cat will need to be kept indoors, and possibly confined to a cage to limit movement while the joint heals. Play is discouraged throughout this time. Physiotherapy may be recommended to assist in strengthening the joint and surrounding muscles.

If the treatment has been performed properly and the post treatment care has been closely followed, the cat will not likely dislocate the joint again. If proper care has not been given,the joint will continue to weaken with each dislocation. Obese cats who have suffered from joint dislocation should lose weight to take stress off of the affected joint. In many cases, no more treatment is needed after the healing process finishes. Monitor your cat’s joint in the years to come to watch for signs of injury-related arthritis development.

Joint Dislocation Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Sandy
Persian
11 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Shoulder dislocation

Medication Used

Pain killers

My cat met an accident with a car. The car ran over her & her left shoulder got dislocated. She is moving but cant put weight on her left leg & Keep it folded all the time X-ray is fine & there is no broken bone etc. Vet adivced to go for surgery or leave it as such & the shoulder may get back in place by itself with the passage of time. Plz advice

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
In this case I would recommend surgical correction of the dislocated joint, whilst the joint may relocate on its own it is painful for Sandy and may never reduce properly. I would make an appointment for surgery for Monday morning so that the joint can be reduced into position. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Maddie
Scottish Fold
1 year 1/2
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

My cat was found in our shop paralyzed. We brought her inside by the heater and now she's shivering and her jaw looks dislocated!! This is the weirdest thing!!! What happened to her? 😭😭

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
I cannot say what happened to Maddie or how, but if her jaw looks dislocated you should take her to your Veterinarian to have the jaw examined and to see if it requires surgical correction. Keep her warm and encourage drinking by giving water dripping from your fingers. However, if the jaw is as bad as you describe you should visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bella
moggy
20 Weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Walking with leg up

Hi,
My kitten fell off my kitchen counter on Saturday onto her back legs/bottom, she did not make any indication she had hurt herself and was fine. Sunday we noticed her walking with her back right leg up and wouldn’t put any weight on it, she slept for pretty much all day Sunday. Monday she has been better, more alert will move around, come up and down off the sofa, she will put some weight on it when sat upright or eating etc and has tried to scratch herself using that leg but mainly hold is up off the floor. Could she have done some serious damage or could it be muscle related or a sprain?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
If Bella is using the limb often for walking, jumping, scratching etc… it may be that she just sprained her leg and requires rest for it to heal; try to limit her movements for a few days and look out for signs of improvement. If there is no improvement by Thursday or Friday or she seems in pain you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination; other problems like growth plate injuries and other issues may occur in kittens so this would need to be kept an eye on. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Butch
Maine Coon
15+
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Medication Used

adequan

Hello, I have a 15+ year old cat who is weakened from kidney failure with a heart murmur . He has arthritis which i have been giving him adaquen for. Could I have possibly dislocated his hip when I picked him up? I spoke to the vet about it already so she knows. I hadn't recalled his foot being cold. She said if he had thrown a clot, his limb would be cold. It's warm. Can the limb rewarm or does it stay cold? A day after or so I noticed his gait is off. He missed scratching his face. When he walks the whole leg kind of is out to the side. Almost like a foot drop but not. When he gets into the kitty box, that leg gets caught on the outside even in the lower box. He's eating as usual but not wanting to walk too far from the bed. We have cat stairs all around so he can get up to his cat tree and look out the window, get down to potty and up to his bed. About once a day he makes it to the kitchen to eat, but otherwise I bring him his food. That may not help him, but I know it's a fine line between keeping his weight with his other conditions (heart/kidneys).He doesn't seem to be in pain. His eye are bright. Can he be in pain and seem normal other than mobility? I also thought of possible stroke? I don't think there is anything I could do to help him but saw this site and thought I would ask. I know he isn't a surgical candidate. Maybe my question could help another as well. Thank you for your time

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
There are various issues which may affect a senior cat and without jumping into diagnostics with MRIs and other techniques, we can only guess at what the underlying cause may be. Your Veterinarian would be able to manipulate the limbs to look for anomalies like dislocated hip or another skeletal issue. Clots are likely as your Veterinarian mentioned, but generally cause the limb to cool down due to a restriction in blood flowing into the lower limb. Pain can be difficult to detect but managing general mobility and reducing mobility can help. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Dr. Callum Turner thank you for your sage advice, thoughts and quick response. It is much appreciated.

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Mo Larry and curly
Mix
12 weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

I have three kittens that all just started limping on their left front leg. One started this morning and now they other two are doing it. They are about 12 weeks old and they stay in the house. Only thing different that has been done is I have changed kitty litter

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
It is strange that they have all started limping on the same leg, if you have changed the litter it may be the leg they use to push the litter around. I would change the litter back to the old type for a few days and bathe your kittens to see if there is any improvement in the limping. If you do not see any improvement in the limping by Monday or Tuesday you should visit your Veterinarian for a general examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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tommy
Siamese cat
1 Year
Fair condition
-1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Limping

i found the joint of 2nd phalanges on the left leg differs from the right. he meows when i touch it like in pain. it also feels crackly when i move the injured toe

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
If Tommy has an injured toe which seems dislocated, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine if it can be reduced or if surgical correction is required. Without examining Tommy I cannot give you an indication of severity. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Billu
Common indian breed
4 months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Hi,
My cat was attacked by a dog.There is no external wound or injury but he falls off while jumping up or down.he turns down while scratching his ears with front leg,looks like his hip is not supporting.but he walks and runs normally.pleaSe advise.
Thanks

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
There are various possible injuries here, I would advise to give Billu lots of rest which may include confinement to a cat carrier. Without examining Billu, I cannot give you much in the way of specific joints affected etc… If there is no improvement after two or three days you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination; also if you notice any neurological symptoms you should visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Willow
mixed
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Holding limb up while walking
Limited Movement
Limping

When my cat came home yesterday she was limping with her right back leg slightly up in the air. She also will kind of drag her leg around if she is not holding it up. Her lower back near the leg also seems to cave in just slightly as if she is trying to walk sideways. She doesn't seem to be in much pain and acts normal besides the weird limping. I think her hip or leg was dislocated because when she is not walking she can put weight on the leg. If this is the case how much would it cost for a vet to fix the leg? How could this have happened to my cat?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
Trauma is the most likely cause of an injury like this; but as far as cost is concerned it would depend on the severity of the dislocation/injury, integrity of the joint, your location, your Veterinarian as well as Willow’s general health. Without an examination, x-rays and knowing where you’re located it is difficult to give a ballpark figure. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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mr grumpus
mixed
2yr
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

my vet told me that my cat has a hip dislocated he wants to cut his hip ball joint out and try to put it back in it was only two days after it happened why would they do that . why wouldnt they try to put it back in

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1675 Recommendations
There are a few different approaches to putting a hip joint back into place; an x-ray would give a good indication to the overall health of the femoral head and the acetabulum which are important to make sure that recurrence is unlikely, if the x-rays showed issues with either of these structures surgery may be required to stabilise the joint. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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