Seizures Average Cost

From 552 quotes ranging from $500 - 6,000

Average Cost

$1,800

First Walk is on Us!

✓ GPS tracked walks
✓ Activity reports
✓ On-demand walkers
Book FREE Walk

Jump to Section

What are Seizures?

If your cat is displaying symptoms of a seizure, it’s important to stay calm. Remove other pets that could harm your cat from the room and call a veterinarian right away.

Seizures are characterized by sudden, violent movements of the body, disorientation, and uncontrollable twitching, among other symptoms. Cats may have a single seizure, or experience multiple seizures in a matter of minutes. Although treatment is usually not given until your cat has experienced multiple seizures, you should still take him to a vet after the first episode.

Symptoms of Seizures in Cats

There are two main types of seizures that your cat may experience: partial and generalized seizures, although the former is more common in cats. Partial seizures only affect one part of the body, while generalized seizures affect the entire body. Each of these types has a different set of symptoms, including:

Partial Seizures

  • Drooling
  • Facial twitching
  • Growling
  • Sudden, strange neck, limb, or head movements

Generalized Seizures

  • Dazed or confused appearance
  • Salivation
  • Urination or defecation
  • Violent shaking throughout the whole body
  • Collapse
  • Twitching

Causes of Seizures in Cats

Unfortunately, the cause of most seizures is unknown. However, some seizures can be caused by health conditions that affect the brain, called intracranial causes, including:

  • Head trauma
  • Brain tumors
  • Fevers
  • Infectious diseases, including leukemia, immunodeficiency virus, and cryptococcosis
  • Congenital disorders

Other seizures are caused by conditions that occur outside of the brain, known as extracranial causes, including:

  • Low blood sugar levels
  • Poisoning
  • Electrolyte imbalance
  • Liver disease
  • Thiamine deficiency

Diagnosis of Seizures in Cats

It’s important to provide your veterinarian with as much information as possible to facilitate the diagnosis. Be sure to talk about your cat’s behavior immediately preceding and following the seizure. Cats often display odd behavior before and after a seizure, so this will help the vet understand exactly what was going on. The vet should be able to determine your cat is having seizures based solely on the information you provide, but to properly diagnose and treat the cat’s condition, the cause of the seizure must be discovered.

The vet will do a complete blood count test, blood chemistry profile and urinalysis to try to determine the cause of the seizures. The complete blood count test is done to see if there is an infection in the body based on the number of white blood cells present in the sample. A blood chemistry profile will give the vet insight to the cat’s liver health, and will also show calcium, sodium, and potassium levels. Finally, the urinalysis will help the vet determine if the kidneys are functioning properly. If something turns up on any of these tests, further tests may be required to pinpoint the exact cause of the seizures.

However, if nothing turns up, the vet may perform an MRI or CT scan to take a closer look at your cat’s brain. This will help the vet diagnose intracranial causes of seizures. 

When a vet is confident your cat is having seizures but cannot identify a cause, he will issue a diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy, meaning the cause is unknown.

Treatment of Seizures in Cats

If there is an underlying cause for the seizure, such as low calcium levels or another diet deficiency, these need to be treated. But in general, treatment does not cure this condition, rather controls it. Cats are often treated with anticonvulsant medication to reduce the number and severity of seizures. The most common anticonvulsants prescribed to cats include phenobarbital and potassium bromide. Your cat may experience side effects including fatigue and unsteadiness on his feet, but these should subside after he gets used to the medication.

Cat owners will be responsible for administering this medication to their cat at home, and it’s very important they follow the vet’s instructions closely. If a dose of medication is missed, the cat may begin to have severe seizures. Even if the cat does not experience any other seizures, the vet will still ask that you bring your cat in frequently to test his blood while he is on the medication.

Recovery of Seizures in Cats

Your cat may need to be on anticonvulsant medication for the rest of his life unless otherwise instructed by the vet. In some cases, the vet will allow you to discontinue the medication if your cat has not had a seizure in over a year. But, it’s important to wean your cat off of the medicine instead of ending it abruptly. Speak to your vet about how to do it if you are told to discontinue the treatment.

Doses of medication may be adjusted over time. For example, if your cat’s body has gotten used to the level of medication, he may begin to experience seizures again and need a higher dose to control his condition. On the other hand, if your cat has not had any seizures, the vet may try to lower the dose. 

Seizures Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Ami
American Shorthair
6 Months
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea
Depression
Foaming mouth

Medication Used

Vitamin

So this happened today, when my cat suddenly had a seizure. His body flew upward and he made a choking sound which is quite scary and saddening. I was frantic and have no idea what to do.

Add a comment to Ami's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Bushey
Persian Crossbreed
Four Years
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

Bushey was a four year old Persian Crossbreed. He was beautiful and affectionate. One day he started screaming and convulsing. He foamed at the mouth and vomited a clear liquid. He rolled over onto his back and frantically pawed the air with all four limbs. This lasted 15 seconds after which he was still and obviously dead. I rang my veterinarian who had recently given him his routine checkup. She said that he must have had an epileptic fit during which he suffered a heart attack. She said that with the quickness of the attack there was nothing anyone could have done and that mercifully he did not suffer.

Add a comment to Bushey's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Pete
Shorthair red tabby
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Pete has had 2 seizures about six months apart. He is always in a deep sleep. He has convulsions for about a minute, drools and wets himself. Very frightened. I noticed that when he’s in my lap and purring he has little twitches. Vet has done bloodwork and calcium levels a little high. She is running additional test to make sure it’s not anomaly. Meanwhile I’m giving phenobarbital transdermally. Is this necessary?

Add a comment to Pete's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Toothless
Bombay
4 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures

My cat toothless has a seizure once a month sometimes every 2-3 months just recently he would have 2 in the same month we’ve took him to vet we decided not to do the medicine because he was getting better instead of every month he started having them every 2-3 months just very confused why he would start having 2 in the same month he is a idiopathic case and it’s very frustrating trying to fix.

Add a comment to Toothless's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Mico
Crossbreed Persian and Siamese
4 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

Hi. I had Mico (my baby kitten) last 4 months ago. He was a very lovely cat. When I am bathing him last 2 weeks ago, he had seizure. I dont know what to do. I had him out of the tub and blew him using blower for him to dry but he is still stiffing. Afterwards, he is already okay. Then 3 weeks later, it happened again. We sent him to the nearest vet and he is undergoing some laboratory tests right now. I hope he will be okay as soon as possible.

Add a comment to Mico's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Gizmo
domestic medium hair
15 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures
Crying

Medication Used

Methimazole

Gizmo is a 15 year old male, he is being treated for hyperthyroidism, he is also on KD food, as he is very early stages of kidney failure so we changed his food for more preventative. His thyroid has been managed very well for the last couple of years with a very low dose of medications. Over the last 10 months it has increased from .8 to 1.4 up to 1.7 in Feb of this year. a week in a half ago he had so sort of episode crying having trouble walking, falling over ( scariest thing I have ever seen) so we rushed him to the kitty emergency room by the time we arrived he had stopped screaming his open mouth breathing was slowing and all his motor functions returned to normal, we scheduled an appointment with a cardiologists who did an ECG some minor thickening in a small area of the heart but they do not feel his heart is the cause as the rest of the heart is functioning without issue. A few days later Last Friday he had another at this point we believe they are seizures, we decided to have all his blood work redone. His thyroid level has again increased since Feb still under the level, His vet has increased his dose as they think that although the level is withing Target range it is too high for him. other levels are all fine ,Last night he had another the severity is very mild compared to the the first one we are aware of. After these events he is fine, eats , plays , cuddles as he has for his whole life.

Add a comment to Gizmo's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Loki
Mix
18 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Convulsions

Medication Used

Phenobarbital

My cat Loki is 18 months old and has suddenly started to have seizures, sometimes 3 times a day. The vet did some blood tests but all came back clear and has now prescribed Phenobarbital 0.1ml however almost immediately after giving him the dose he has another seizure. Should I stop giving him this medication and go back to the vets to try something else?

Add a comment to Loki's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Gracie
Domestic shorthair
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Medication Used

Pentobarbital

We have had Gracie for about two years. She started having seizures a month after we adopted her when she was about a year old. We have had her on phenobarbital since she was having seizures multiple times a month. It has been over a year now and she hasn’t had any seizures. We get her blood work done about every six months and her protein levels were slightly off last time (may be related to the phenobarbital, but maybe not). We are considering lowering her dose if she continues to not have seizures. Our vet told us it was up to us if we want to try to lower the dose or keep it the same. Does anyone have experience lowering the dose of phenobarbital?

Add a comment to Gracie's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Câline
european
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures

My 6 year-old cat has suddenly started having a seizure at the slightest stimulus, whether it's sound, smell, sight etc. She does a complete roll on the right. Nothing was found in blood tests, she had an MRI scan and tests on the cerebrospinal fluid and again everything appears normal. She always jerks and turns around on the right side. She's on anti-epilepsy medication but it doesn't help at all. Every move (drink, eat, use the litter tray) means she suddenly jerks on the right side and does a complete tern. Vets (in France) say they have never seen anything like it. They have contacted vets in the US who have also never seen a similar case. I was told there was nothing to do and that she should be put down. I would appreciate any help.

Add a comment to Câline's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Link
Nebelung
8 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

See detailed description above

Medication Used

none

My cat is having very unique seizures. First off the pre-ictal phase consists of some kind of minor walking or jumping issue involving his rear legs a few hours before the seizure. It only lasts for a few moments and then he is fine. Right before the actual seizure event, he seems to know it is about to happen and will get onto the floor very quickly.
Once the seizure hits him his entire body will instantly flop from one side to the other and then back. Today he only flopped once. That is usually it. The whole thing lasts about 2 seconds. Although today he did make a destressed howl for an additional 3 or 4 seconds.
Then he is pretty much completely normal. He does tend to hide under the bed and rest for a couple of hours or more, but does not seem disoriented or confused.
He started having them a few months ago. Had had 2 or 3 within a month's time. Then they stopped for almost 2 months until the one he just had about 90 minutes ago.

Add a comment to Link's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Mimi
Mix
1 Year
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures
Drooling
Facial twitch
Feline Leukemia

Medication Used

Phenobarbital
Diazepam

Hi,

My cat started having first seizure around 10-11 days ago. Started with a 5-6 a day. The vet gave her IV and put her on Phenobarbital. The following days the seizures was becomming more and more frequent, with 1-2 hours in between. As the Phenobarbital wasn't helping, she's been given diazepam to control the seizures. It worked ok in the beginning, as it knocked her out, and she didn't have any seizures while in deep sleep. Now it has become much worse - need more diazepam to make her sleep, and when she is awake the seizures occurs every 10 min or less. She is at the vet every day to get IV plus trying to control the seizures.

The seizure are mostly partial (focal?) with facial twitching, heavy drool, and jaw clicking. She used to have 1-2 full body seizures pr. day, which stopped after being put on diazepam.

She does eat plenty and drink when 'awake'. Also cleans herself - for a few minutes before the next fit comes.

Important note: The cat is around 1 year old, and has been tested positive for feline leukemia.

I guess my question is: Is there any hope? It is truly heartbreaking to witness, and don't want her to suffer anymore if there is no hope.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
There are many causes of seizures in cats (including FeLV) and in many cases it is a case of trying to manage the seizures as best as possible, medical management can be difficult and unrewarding in some cases but without examining Mimi I cannot recommend any specific course of treatment since I cannot determine whether or not there is an underlying cause which also needs to be managed as well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/cat/symptom/why-is-my-cat-having-seizures

Add a comment to Mimi's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Luna
I dont know
1 Month
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

Hello, so my baby kitten been getting seizures. The doctor doesn't really know the cause from it maybe head trauma. So i decided to bring her home and the nurse gave her medicine for her seizures what do i do if she gets a seizure i dont have money to take her back to the emergency vet hospital. Im so scared to lose her and oh yeah they prescribe her medication but i have to wait till tomorrow.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
It really depends on the medication which was prescribed to her, but if Luna has another seizure you should ensure that she isn’t going to hurt herself and give her reassurance afterwards; the medication which you will pick up will come with instructions which you should follow. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Add a comment to Luna's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Misty
Domestic cat
3 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Frequent Urination

My cat has just had her 2nd seizure, she is 3 years old and has had some unusual urinary habits of late. She starts to urinate squatting as normal then stands up and sometimes her urine is spotty, does she have an infection? I will be taking her to the vet as soon as I can get an appt but am worried about her. She is a very nervous cat that doesn't like strangers, she is also a house cat and doesn't go outside, any help/advice would be very welcome. My email address is [email protected] if you want to respond via email.

Thanks


Julie Davis

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1611 Recommendations
Frequent urination is one sign of a urinary tract infection or problem, and that may be what is going on with her. Your veterinarian will be able to test her urine and see what is going on. As far as her seizures go, depending on the frequency of her seizures, that may be something that you want to treat her for. If the seizures are infrequent and not severe, they don't always need treatment, but when you have your appointment with her, that is an important thing to mention.

Add a comment to Misty's experience

Was this experience helpful?

abbie
tabby
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling
Drooling Shaking
Drooling Shaking eyes closed

Hello.
My 7 year old female cat had a seizure about a year and a half ago. Vet
could find nothing wrong at that point.She has just had another one. She has been find till now.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
It seems that the seizures are very infrequent which is good, daily management wouldn’t be required; but you should visit your Veterinarian again for another examination and to discuss your options. Continue to monitor Abbie and try to think (I know it is hard) if there is anything similar which happened before both episodes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Add a comment to abbie's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Hades
tabby
4 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Not Moving
Stiffening

I put Hades in the bath tub for a couple hours because I was cleaning the house and going to bathe him. I brought him water and food. All he did was push it away so I took it out and put it back where I keep his bowl. I came back after an hour of cleaning to bathe him and he wasn't moving. His back legs are stiff and his front legs are limp. He was breathing normal for about five minutes then he started breathing heavy and meowing really loud and fast. He stretched out and kept crying then went back to the way he is now. He is currently not moving and baring breathing and the animal hospitals are closed. I am worried for my fur baby.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1611 Recommendations
I am worried for Hades as well. There should be emergency after hour care available, if you call one of the clinics near you they should have an after hours number. I don't know what is going on with him without examining him, but he needs medical attention right away.

Add a comment to Hades's experience

Was this experience helpful?