Rupture of the Bladder Average Cost

From 338 quotes ranging from $18,000 - 3,500

Average Cost

$2,200

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What is Rupture of the Bladder?

A ruptured bladder is where the bladder is torn, and urine leaks into the rest of your dog’s abdominal cavity. Trauma to the bladder is incredibly common, and can be a very serious condition that may  lead to uroperitoneum. This has been linked to serious metabolic and multisystemic disorders, that if not treated promptly and correctly, can be deadly. A ruptured bladder most commonly happens when there is blunt force trauma, but can also happen a number of other ways.

Rupture of the bladder occurs when the bladder has burst or been torn, allowing urine to leak into the abdominal cavity.  Most often this is due to blunt force trauma.

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Symptoms of Rupture of the Bladder in Dogs

The symptoms of a ruptured bladder will vary depending on the cause of the rupture; there will always be some degree of pain associated with it. Ruptured bladders will most often have symptoms prior to the tearing that you can keep an eye on. 

  • A urinary tract infection
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Unable to urinate
  • Bloody urine (hematuria)
  • Depression
  • Change in appetite 
  • Vomiting
  • A distended belly
  • Hypovolemic shock (a loss in blood volume)
  • Peritoneal signs (the swelling of the abdominal cavity)
  • Fractured pelvis (will almost always be present in blunt force trauma causes)
  • Significant bloody urine (will also almost always be present in a blunt force case)

Types

There are only two different types of classifications of injured bladders, and they are classed by the severity of the injury. Each type of injury can be located just outside the abdominal cavity in a space called the extraperitoneal space, inside the abdominal cavity being called intraperitoneal space, or within both locations. 

Contusion – Injury with bruising but no broken or torn soft tissues; presents pain, sensitivity to touch, and inflammation

Rupture – Injury that produces the bursting open of the bladder, allowing for urine to spill out into the abdominal cavity

Causes of Rupture of the Bladder in Dogs

  • Only a few things will cause your pet’s  bladder to rupture, the most common being blunt force trauma to his lower abdominal cavity
  • Other reasons can be a blockage in his urinary tract, a tumor, a bladder disease, and during surgery 
  • The bladder is the most injured organ during surgery in the abdominal cavity and pelvic region, happening during the surgery itself or even while having a catheter administered 
  • Surgeries that can injure your dog’s bladder are gynecological surgeries, a colon resection, and a transurethral surgery
  • Past surgeries, and radiation treatments that create scarring can become a predisposition for a ruptured bladder as well

Diagnosis of Rupture of the Bladder in Dogs

As a pet owner who physically takes your dog out to relieve himself, it will be easier to notice any changes in your dogs urinating habits. If you start to notice him having difficulty voiding himself, the inability to void, or blood in his urine call your veterinary office immediately. By monitoring any changes in his behavior, eating, or swelling in his belly and abdominal cavity, you can assist in your veterinarian correctly and promptly diagnosing your dog. If you know of any blunt trauma he may have sustained, call your veterinarian immediately. 

Once you have contacted the veterinary office, the team of caretakers will run tests to ensure a correct diagnosis. These tests may include a retrograde cystography. This is simply a test that utilizes x-rays with 350 mL of contrast placed into the bladder using an IV. The contrast gives the ability to also see if there are any intra-abdominal injuries and fractures to the pelvis.

Another method will be a plain abdominal radiograph. This is a plain x-ray without using contrast in the bladder. A rectal exam may also be conducted to look for any blood. If blood is found to be present it may indicate a concomitant bowel injury. Abdominal ultrasounds may be used to see if there is any fluid in the peritoneal space, and help guide an abdominocentesis (fluid taken from the abdominal cavity for testing).

Treatment of Rupture of the Bladder in Dogs

The first and most important step in treatment will be to stabilize your dog for surgery, after this has been done your veterinarian will drain any leaked urine from his abdominal cavity. Stabilizing your dog will be done in steps as well. 

Isotonic saline will be given through an IV, though the amount will depend on your dog. ECG monitoring will most likely be the next step in tracking any cardiac changes. Pain medication and antibiotics will be administered.

Draining the urine will also require steps to be taken:

  • Peritoneal dialysis catheter
  • Urethral catheter
  • Cystostomy tube (if a urethral catheter can not be used)

Once your dog has been stabilized, the next step will be a procedure called an exploratory laparotomy. This is will enable a visual view of any tears in his bladder. If necessary, any tissue that has been damaged or died will be removed. The bladder will be stitched, and cultures taken for microbial and septic testing. A lavage (the cleansing of the internal cavity by water) will be done, with the abdomen being closed immediately following.

Recovery of Rupture of the Bladder in Dogs

Recovery for a ruptured bladder will come in steps, and barring any possible complications is very high in prognosis. IV fluids will be given directly following surgery until your dog is able to drink on his own and antibiotics will be prescribed if your dog was found to be septic. Pain medication will be given for the first 48 hours following surgery in addition to gastric protectants to ensure there is no more injury from stomach acid. 

Home care should be restricted to rest with very short leashed walks for the first 2 weeks, ensuring the laparotomy to heal. Stitches will be removed 7-10 days following surgery if no complications have arisen. Your veterinarian may have other suggestions for home care, it is very important to follow the instructions given to you and to keep all follow up appointments. Your companion should be able to eat and drink unhindered within one to two days following surgery.

Rupture of the Bladder Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Ava
Yorkshire Terrier
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

We suspected my Yorkie had a UTI as she had 3 accidents in the house within 2 days which is very out of character for her. I brought her into the vet right away (yesterday) where they catheterized her to get a urine sample for a culture test. The test is not back yet but I noticed a bruise on her lower belly today. Is this common after a quick catheterization like this? She seems to be completely normal other than that- eating & drinking as normal & not lethargic really (she still went for a few little walks & played a bit) but she is 10 year old so she also enjoys her rest. Should I be concerned about this? Enough to warrant taking her to an emergency 24 hr vet? Thanks!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2950 Recommendations
While bruising isn’t a common issue, although bruising may occur due to a variety of reasons including restraint, other injury among other causes; you should keep an eye on the bruise and bring it up with your Veterinarian at your next appointment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lily
Jack Russell Terrier
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Leaks urine

We just adopted a rescue that was abused by means of kicking and hitting.
We noticed that she leaks urine while sleeping.
She has been sterilized and is about 3 years old.
She seems to be in good health, eats good and has energy.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1375 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining Lily, I can't comment on why she is having that problem, but possible causes might be a urinary tract infection, kidney or liver disease, or estrogen-responsive incontinence. it would be best to have her examined by your veterinarian to have an exam, and some testing done if needed, to determine the cause and get treatment for her. I hope that she does well.

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Baron
German Shepherd
7 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Fluid In Abdomen

My dog nephew is going into surgery tomorrow. It’s been determined he had a bladder rupture and almost died twice before we got him somewhere that they were able to figure it out.

They couldn’t find an actual tear or puncture. A catheter and fluids was making him better and thought the bladder tear had healed, but they kept him to verify. They took him off fluids and the catheter. He relapsed and his abdomen filled with fluid again. They think his bladder wall was weakened and died. They’re going to do surgery tomorrow and see if they can remove the dead tissue. If not, they will put him down.

I guess I’m looking for a little comfort. Is it likely that the bladder tissue is has completely died and won’t be repairable? It has been a week and 3 days since we rushed him to a vet that gave the wrong diagnosis. It took 4 days for us to get him where he is now with a staff that knows what they’re doing. It could of been a preexisiting bacteria or infection that may have weakened his bladder walls. Who knows how long. However, this all started when he jumped off the porch and he couldn’t walk and had to be rushed to the vet. Then all this started. Could the jump of ruptured his bladder? Making him not want to walk? How likely this surgery saves his life?

When they have him on fluids, catheter, and an antibiotic he acts like himself. Happy, spunky, eating, drinking, walking, and playing with his toys. Once off, he goes down.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2950 Recommendations
An intravenous pyelogram is the diagnostic method of choice for bladder rupture, but you need to suspect an issue to do the test as it is not a standard test. If there is adequate viable tissue, the surgeon will be able to remove any non-viable tissue, oppose and close the healthy viable margins to close the bladder; I do not have enough information or data to give you any statistics on this surgery. However, jumping off a porch which may have increased the intra abdominal pressure within the abdomen when he landed may have caused the a weak area of the bladder to rupture. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bella
Maltese
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

cant keep food down

My dog recently had bladder stones and had her bladder rupture. She was in the hospital for two weeks. During this time she stop eating for a while and then when she started eating, food or water would not stay down. It has been a little over a month and this is still happening. I have found that pureeing her food help some, but most times its still coming back up. I have had test ran to see what is going on and I cannot get any answers. please help

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2950 Recommendations
In this type of case, it can be hard to determine specifically why a dog cannot keep down their food; I would recommend to try to feed small regular portions of boiled chicken and rice as this is a bland diet and shouldn’t irritate the stomach. Feeding small portions may include feeding regularly every four or six hours which I know can be difficult around work and other commitments; other than this, there is little other advice I can offer. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bear
Yorkshire Terrier
11 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

fast breathing rate

My dog got hit by a car last night and broke his femur, pelvis bone, and leg. They did an ultrasound to check for the bladder and found nothing only fluid in his abdomen. Is this certain that his bladder ruptured? They haven't given me a actual yes just a "possibly".

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2950 Recommendations

The only answer I can give you is possibly (as I haven’t examined Bear), but if the bladder is empty and there is fluid in the abdomen, there are two possibilities 1) the bladder has ruptured and urine is in the abdomen (cystocentesis will confirm) or 2) bladder is intact and ascites has formed in the abdomen. Further examination is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

They have had him on fluids since last night. He hardly ever drinks water at night and doesn't urinate till the morning. Can this just be his body doing that? Or the fluids would have made way to his bladder?

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Chico
Border Collie
11
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

I brought my 11 year old dog, Chico, to the vet today because of distended abdomen that appears to be getting worse since I noticed it almost 2 weeks ago. Chico still voids and defecate regular, his stool is soft. His appetite is stool good, and been drinking plenty of water. He eats dry food. He remains active and mobile. His vet did CBC & BMP, and all values are within normal limits, however, the vet had to take out 800 cc of urine from the abdomen for the abdominal x-ray. Vet said Chico's left side of the heart is bad, and he has an enlarged heart, and murmur. The vet inserted a urinary catheter on Chico & sent him home. He recommended that Chico go to surgery to repair the suspected bladder leak next week. I am worried though that Chico might not survive the surgery because of his heart condition. I need some advise please. Thank you in advance.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2950 Recommendations
Your Veterinarian would have recommended the surgery considering Chico’s overall health; if your Veterinarian suspected that Chico wouldn’t survive, they wouldn’t recommend surgery. Dogs with murmurs are operated on all the time, good management is key. Is the issue a ruptured bladder or ascites? If Chico has been urinating normally, I don’t know; I am sure your Veterinarian tested the fluid. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Olive
Toy fox mix
4 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Ruptured bladder

My puppy jumped off of the porch and ruptured her bladder. Is there any way that the tissue could be healed itself. Also will there b any complications after ifwe go through with the surgery. Shes 4 months old and I'm not ready to say goodbye.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1375 Recommendations
The bladder will not heal on it's own, unfortunately, and surgery is needed to repair the rupture. There may be complications with the surgery, but it depends on the degree of rupture and time since the injury. That really is the only option for her. I hope that everything goes well for her.

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Gublu
Road asian
2 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

My dog is stop doing toilet for an car accident..From last 2 day before he stop doing toilet..We have taken to the vaterian .He examined & did x-ray also..He told that it may chance that bludder has burst after that they prescribed some medicine and discharge the dog instead of any kind of surgery or treatment...what will we do..Please help...

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2950 Recommendations
If urinary bladder rupture is suspected, intravenous pyelogram or filling the urinary bladder with iodine based contrast media using a urinary catheter would confirm the integrity of the urinary bladder. If the bladder is ruptured, surgical correction would be required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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