How to Give a Dog a Blowout

Medium
5 - 15 Minutes
4 Months

Introduction

Giving your dog a blowout is a quick and easy way to get rid of winter undercoat that might be shedding or pulling out in clumps once the weather begins to turn warmer. A blowout, if done with a forceful dog blower, can take just a few minutes to blow your dog's undercoat right off of his body. Professional dog groomers often use dog blowers to remove your dog's undercoat before grooming. This saves tons of time because combing or brushing out with an undercoat rake takes a long time, especially if you have a large breed dog. Before you give your dog a blowout, you should understand that it is a messy task. Your dog will look as if his fur is blowing up into the air, filling the space where you are with tufts and clumps of fur. You may want to prepare yourself before you give your dog a blowout by wearing a face mask and clothing you don't mind getting dirty. 

Dog's Perspective

Your dog is going to feel amazing once this undercoat is blown off of his skin and fur. However, be prepared for your dog to feel a little bit anxious. Especially if you're using a high force dog blower and he's never done this before. If you use a personal hair dryer as well, even that sound might be a little intimidating for your dog. To ease some of this anxiety, you may want to let your dogs sniff the dryer or blower before you turn it on. Then place your dog a little bit away from the blower and let him hear the sound of it before you have it on him. Be patient with your dog, and take your time with a blowout. Just make sure he is comfortable along the way as well.

Caution & Considerations

  • Consider the way your dog's breed looks typically. If you want this look, make sure you are blowing your dog out and grooming him to that breed’s guidelines.
  • If your dog has a double coat, he will blow his coat at least twice a year depending on where you live and how the seasons change. Dogs who have blown their coat have clumps of fur that can be lifted right off of their body. This is the perfect time for a blowout.
  • Your dog may be able to get away with a blowout just those few times a year. Other dogs may need it more often depending on their undercoat how much they shed.
  • If you're grooming your dog and brushing your dog on a regular basis, blowouts will produce less undercoat each time you do it.
  • Caring for your dog by grooming him on a regular basis will create a healthy coat so blowouts that are necessary are not as messy.
  • Position yourself and your dog in a spot that can accommodate dog hair flying all over the place before you decide to do a blowout. This might mean doing it in a closed room within your home or placing your dog outside for a blowout.
  • Be prepared to clean up quite the mess once the blowout is done. But know that a blowout for a long haired or extremely fluffy dog with a double coat is necessary to maintain a beautiful dog with healthy skin and coat.

Conclusion

Everyone loves a good blowout. Your dog may not be excited at first, but to keep your dog beautiful and fluffy a good blowout, especially in times when your dog blows coat, is necessary to keep your pup in Top Dog shape. If you have a dog that is oh-so-fluffy, he will enjoy a good blowout as necessary because it will get rid of his winter coat, bringing him into spring and summer condition.

Success Stories and Grooming Questions

Grooming Questions & Answers

Question
Rosie
Siberian Husky
2 Years
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Rosie
Siberian Husky
2 Years

I have all the brushes and blower, but in what order do I use them?

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Question
Sandy
Pappion
5 Years
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Question
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Sandy
Pappion
5 Years

Idk what kind of thing to buy

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
0 Dog owners recommended

Hi Lakiah, when considering the proper tool for blowing out your Papillon's coat, it is very important to make sure that you purchase a blower that is specific to dogs. This is because the temperature setting will always be cool so that there is no risk of excessive heat being applied to Sandy's skin. I would suggest you take Sandy to the groomer and have them try the blower to see your dog's reaction; some dogs are timid. Having the blowout done a few times by an experienced person will get Sandy used to the blower and then you can do it more easily at home. The groomer can give you tips, too!

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Question
McFasa
Siberian Husky
4 Years
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Question
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McFasa
Siberian Husky
4 Years

I ordered a blower for dogs but there isn't a cool setting. There is a "none" setting and a warm setting. The non setting is too warm I think. I can not find a blower that has a cool setting so that cool air comes out. I am only using it to help blow out his coat. I have two huskies.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
0 Dog owners recommended

Hello, the blower will need a warm setting but not too hot or cold. I would ask your groomer for a recommendation. You can also look online to purchase, but be sure the item is not too hot. Warm is ideal. Never hold the blower close to the skin as a burn can occur. In the meantime, use a deshedding tool and a slicker brush. Brush the dogs every couple of days. Use a slicker brush - just do not press too hard with the metal bristles. Brush the dogs daily. All the best!

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Question
Willie Mae Thornton
Newfoundland
8 Months
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Question
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Willie Mae Thornton
Newfoundland
8 Months

I have the equipment and have been working with Willie Mae on blowing her coat both when wet and dry. I need suggestion on how to contain the fur!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
0 Dog owners recommended

Hello, very cute photo! Containing Willie Mae's fur may be a challenge! It's one of the effects of grooming and cleaning up afterward is just part of the experience. Keep a container nearby for sweeping up and depositing the hair every few minutes. Working outside may be wise, too! Wear eye protection and maybe even a mask to not inhale hair particles. Good for you for getting her used to this lengthy process at a young age. Here are a few details on grooming the Newfoundland:https://www.ncanewfs.org/conformation/pages/coatcare.html. Good luck!

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Question
Sky
Siberian Husky
4 Years
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Question
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Sky
Siberian Husky
4 Years

Thoughts on an air compressor with blow gun nozzle? Possible PSI to keep it at to not hurt him.

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