How to Give a Dog a Blowout

Medium
5 - 15 Minutes
4 Months

Introduction

Giving your dog a blowout is a quick and easy way to get rid of winter undercoat that might be shedding or pulling out in clumps once the weather begins to turn warmer. A blowout, if done with a forceful dog blower, can take just a few minutes to blow your dog's undercoat right off of his body. Professional dog groomers often use dog blowers to remove your dog's undercoat before grooming. This saves tons of time because combing or brushing out with an undercoat rake takes a long time, especially if you have a large breed dog. Before you give your dog a blowout, you should understand that it is a messy task. Your dog will look as if his fur is blowing up into the air, filling the space where you are with tufts and clumps of fur. You may want to prepare yourself before you give your dog a blowout by wearing a face mask and clothing you don't mind getting dirty. 

Dog's Perspective

Your dog is going to feel amazing once this undercoat is blown off of his skin and fur. However, be prepared for your dog to feel a little bit anxious. Especially if you're using a high force dog blower and he's never done this before. If you use a personal hair dryer as well, even that sound might be a little intimidating for your dog. To ease some of this anxiety, you may want to let your dogs sniff the dryer or blower before you turn it on. Then place your dog a little bit away from the blower and let him hear the sound of it before you have it on him. Be patient with your dog, and take your time with a blowout. Just make sure he is comfortable along the way as well.

The De-Shedding Method

Effective
0 Votes
Slicker Brush
Shampoo
Pin Brush
Deshedder
Dryer
Step
1
Dog blower
Using a blower specifically for dogs, start the blowout on your dog’s belly, moving upward and out. You can use a personal hair dryer, but be sure to keep it on a cool setting. A dog blower will have more force to get the excess fur off your dog's coat.
Step
2
One side
Focus on one side at a time. Once the belly has been done, move to the hindquarters and move the dryer from the bottom of the leg up to the dog’s upper thigh. At this point, the dog’s undercoat should be flying off his coat. If you are sensitive to dog fur, you may want to wear a mask. Dogs who have an undercoat will shed this during a blowout, and it will be messy.
Step
3
Next side
Repeat on the other side before moving to the ribs. Work through the coat with your fingers if necessary.
Step
4
Side and back
Continue moving the blower from the bottom of your dog’s ribs to his back, blowing out any excess fur and undercoat. Moving in the opposite direction as the fur grows will help get the excess fur off the dog.
Step
5
Neck
Finish by blowing the neck and head. Be careful of your dog’s eyes and ears with the dryer’s airflow. Don’t forget to blow out the dog’s chest as well.
Step
6
Bathe
Bathe your dog, getting much more released fur out of your dog’s coat.
Step
7
Towel dry
With an absorbent towel, dry your dog after his bath. Start by soaking up as much water as you can by patting the towel on your dog’s fur before rubbing any fur with the towel.
Step
8
Brush
If your dog has any tangles, brush his coat gently to release knots and smooth the coat.
Recommend grooming method?

The Undercoat Method

Effective
0 Votes
Slicker Brush
Pin Brush
Deshedder
Dryer
Step
1
Blown coat
Dogs who blow their coat will have noticeable signs it’s time for a blowout. These clumps of undercoat will be noticeable either by areas surrounding without this coat or clumping of fur with a different texture than the top coat. Dogs with an undercoat will usually blow their coat at least twice a year.
Step
2
Dry dog
Start with a dry dog who has not been bathed but has been brushed. A dog who is brushed on a regular basis will be a better candidate for an undercoat blowout. Brushing your dog on a regular basis will help your dog to blow the undercoat when he is ready.
Step
3
Blower
Using a blower, start on one side of your dog blowing, upward and side to side releasing the dog’s undercoat. This undercoat will simply fly off your dog and into the air.
Step
4
Go slow
Moving the blower slowly across the dog, use your fingers to gently remove undercoat. A mid-size dog may take ten minutes while a larger dog might take longer.
Step
5
Against the grain
Move the blower from the bottom and rear of your dog to the top and front of the dog to remove the undercoat. Going against the grain will be more effective at removing this loose fur.
Step
6
Brush
Brush your dog well after the blow out to remove any loose fur from the surface. If you still see undercoat, you may need to blow again.
Step
7
Maintain
Keep your dog brushed on a regular basis to control his undercoat. Depending on seasons in your area, your dog may need an undercoat blowout before summer and before winter.
Recommend grooming method?

Caution & Considerations

  • Consider the way your dog's breed looks typically. If you want this look, make sure you are blowing your dog out and grooming him to that breed’s guidelines.
  • If your dog has a double coat, he will blow his coat at least twice a year depending on where you live and how the seasons change. Dogs who have blown their coat have clumps of fur that can be lifted right off of their body. This is the perfect time for a blowout.
  • Your dog may be able to get away with a blowout just those few times a year. Other dogs may need it more often depending on their undercoat how much they shed.
  • If you're grooming your dog and brushing your dog on a regular basis, blowouts will produce less undercoat each time you do it.
  • Caring for your dog by grooming him on a regular basis will create a healthy coat so blowouts that are necessary are not as messy.
  • Position yourself and your dog in a spot that can accommodate dog hair flying all over the place before you decide to do a blowout. This might mean doing it in a closed room within your home or placing your dog outside for a blowout.
  • Be prepared to clean up quite the mess once the blowout is done. But know that a blowout for a long haired or extremely fluffy dog with a double coat is necessary to maintain a beautiful dog with healthy skin and coat.

Conclusion

Everyone loves a good blowout. Your dog may not be excited at first, but to keep your dog beautiful and fluffy a good blowout, especially in times when your dog blows coat, is necessary to keep your pup in Top Dog shape. If you have a dog that is oh-so-fluffy, he will enjoy a good blowout as necessary because it will get rid of his winter coat, bringing him into spring and summer condition.

Success Stories and Grooming Questions

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