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What is Throwing up After Eating?

Should your dog be throwing up after eating, there are quite a few things to consider. To begin, you will want to question if what you are observing is vomiting or regurgitation. Vomiting occurs when your dog expels the contents of his stomach through his mouth. When your dog vomits it will seem that his entire body is impacted as his stomach muscles will undergo strong and multiple contractions in the effort. Regurgitation is when the food comes from his mouth or esophagus, having not get made it to his stomach. Both of these can occur right after eating or several hours later. Often when your dog throws up not long after eating, the food will be undigested. Reasons that your dog may be vomiting after eating include:

  • Ingesting grass
  • Eating too fast 
  • Sudden change in diet
  • Eating something that is inedible

Whether your dog’s throwing up after having eaten is serious will depend on the cause.

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Why Throwing up After Eating Occurs in Dogs

Ingesting Grass

Dogs will often eat grass when their stomach hurts in the first place; this means that a dog will often throw up not long after ingesting grass. Throwing up may or may not be related to eating the grass. It is thought that some types of grass can help your dog vomit in order to eliminate foods from his stomach. 

Eating too Fast

If your dog eats his food too quickly he may experience a mild case of indigestion, which can result in his vomiting. Other symptoms, such as bloating, can indicate that his condition may worsen.

Sudden Change in Diet

Introducing a new diet to your dog can lead to gastrointestinal intolerance and result in vomiting. This is often because he does not digest the food and in some cases, may have an intolerance to it. His body will then work to eliminate the food from his system.

Eating Something That is Inedible

In the case that your dog has eaten something inedible, the food will not be able to be broken down by his digestive tract and then absorbed by his body. His stomach muscles will contract as his body works to get the undigested item out of his body by vomiting.

Other reasons for vomiting, though not necessarily after eating, are numerous and include:

  • Pancreatitis or pancreatic tumors
  • Kidney failure (when the kidneys lack the ability to remove waste, the waste products will build up in your dog’s system, resulting in vomiting)
  • Liver failure
  • Bladder obstruction

What to do if your Dog is Throwing up After Eating

If you observe your dog vomiting once and he otherwise appears healthy, his vomiting is likely not a concern. Should he vomit repeatedly, his vomit contains blood and/or he appears ill, you will want to contact your veterinarian and bring your dog in for an examination. 

When meeting with your veterinarian, you will likely be asked a variety of questions in order for your veterinarian to understand what is occurring. Be prepared to let your veterinarian know when the vomiting first began, what it looks like, if there is blood in his vomit and if your dog appears to be physically uncomfortable. He may also inquire as to whether your dog appears to want to vomit but is unable to get anything out, whether it is possible that your dog has eaten something that is toxic or could be poisonous and whether he has had diarrhea. All of these questions will help your veterinarian determine whether your dog is vomiting or regurgitating and whether he is doing so is because of gastric or non-gastric disease. Your veterinarian will consider the presence of other symptoms like fever, pain, dehydration, depression and weight loss.

Your veterinarian will conduct a physical examination of your dog, evaluating his heart and respiration, as well as checking his mouth, abdomen and rectum. Depending on what is observed during the physical examination, your veterinarian may recommend laboratory testing. A fecal flotation will test for parasites and if a bacterial infection is suspected a fecal culture and sensitivity test will be recommended. If other signs of illness are present, a complete blood count and chemistry profile may be recommended. Should your veterinarian have any concern about a tumor or foreign object he may request x-rays. Barium study, endoscopy, colonoscopy and ultrasound are other options that may be considered depending upon what is seen during the examination.

After determining if there is a health condition causing your dog’s vomiting, as well as what that condition is, your veterinarian will provide treatment recommendations. Often, your veterinarian will recommend not feeding your dog for about 24 hours and providing small quantities of water often. In some cases, a bland diet will be recommended going forward and if vomiting does not continue, you can slowly return your dog to his usual diet. In some situations, the diet will have to be permanently changed and certain ingredients avoided. Medication may be prescribed by your veterinarian for certain conditions.

If during the examination your veterinarian notices that your dog is dehydrated, he may administer intravenous or subcutaneous fluids.

Prevention of Throwing up After Eating

Feeding your dog a well-rounded, nutritious diet is important for helping him to maintain his health. In addition, you will want to ensure that he gets plenty of exercise and maintains a healthy weight. Annual veterinary examinations are helpful as this will allow for conditions that can lead to your dog vomiting to be discovered before the condition worsens.

It is also helpful to keep your dog from being outdoors where leftovers or garbage are available, or where he can ingest items that may be poisonous to him. Make sure to wash his food and water bowls each day and provide him fresh water on a daily basis. Should you decide to change your dog’s diet, you will want to do so gradually.

Cost of Throwing up After Eating

The cost of your dog vomiting after eating will depend upon the reason it is occurring. Should your dog be vomiting as a result of a dietary change or ingesting his food too quickly, the cost will be minimal if anything. Should he be vomiting due to pancreatitis, for example, the average cost for treatment is $2200.

Throwing up After Eating Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Anouk
American Pitbull Terrier
9 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Vommiting

I have a 9 year old American Pitbull mix. Starting yesterday she has been throwing up her food. She eats her food and throws up a few minutes after. It looks like her food as if it is not chewed. She did it again this morning. I thought maybe it was the food so I bought her new food and she threw that up as well. This is random and now I’m concerned something is wrong. Otherwise she seems okay.

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
314 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining her, I can't really comment on what might be going on with her, but if she has vomited both of those foods over the last couple of days, it would be worth an exam with your veterinarian to make sure that she is okay, see if she is having any problems that need to be treated, and get her started on medication for what is happening. I hope that Anouk is okay!

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Toby
Dutch Shepherd
Three Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My dutch shepherd mix has been throwing up two nights in a row. First time he did it, he threw up after about 5 hours after dinner (530pm feeding, threw up around 10pm). We took him outside and he threw up twice more but mostly liquid since most of the food came out the first vomit. We gave him little less of a food the next morning and had no issues so thought he was fine but at dinner, again 530pm feeding, he threw up around 9pm, again, everything he ate for dinner. then again around midnight, just the liquid this time. We had him for about 5 months now, no change in his diet at all. His energy level is the same, appetite is the same. We have another dog who gets the exact same food and treats and exercises and he seems perfectly fine. I'm ready to take him to urgent care if he throw up again 3rd night. What I dont understand is why he's ok after breakfast (around 10am feeding) but not dinner and why the sudden vomiting? Vomit itself has no blood or anything other than what he ate 4-5hours again, mostly digested. please help!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1832 Recommendations
There are various causes for vomiting and may be attributable to something consumed during the day, infections, parasites, foreign objects (but we would expect him to vomit after breakfast), food intolerance (breakfast is fine), stress (the night may be stressful for him now) among other causes. I would visit your Veterinarian in the morning for a once over since the symptoms are not clearly pointing towards a specific cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Just an update: after Toby threw up on 3rd night, we took him to urgent care and examined by the vet; nothing seemed wrong so was told to give pepcid (30mg) once a day (yes, the same pepcid for human) but that night (4th night) he threw up aagain, around midnight (same 530pm dinner feeding). We went back to the vet immediately, took Xray and got blood work done. Xray showed nothing was obstructing his GI tract but he had a bit of gas. Still waiting for blood work result but most likely it'll be fine. Was asked to keep the white rice and boiled chicken diet but add canned pumpkin (he hasn't pooped over 36 hours at this point). Also got anti vomit med (to prevent nausea). After the anti vomit med, pepcid and bland diet, he did not throw up that night; and also did a poo the next morning. he seems like he's on his way to recovery!

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Charlie
Boxer
8 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Regurgitating

My dog Charlie always had a problem with regurgitating, but recently it seems that he regurgitates almost every time he eats. He is nine years and a boxer. The kibble is still intact and has lots of saliva. There is no blood evident. Discomfort is not apparent after this happens. Could this just be because he eats too fast? Is there a way to combat this and is it medically hazardous?

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
314 Recommendations
Thank you for contacting us about Charlie. It may be because he eats too fast, and there are bowls that you can buy that have obstacles in them to slow down dogs who do eat too fast. If you try one of those bowls, and he is still having this problem, it would be a good idea to have him evaluated by your veterinarian, as there are some systemic diseases that may be causing this, for example thyroid disease, although there are others. I hope that we does well.

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The Bug
French Bull dog
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

my frenchie threw up her food immediately after eating the last two days now. She seems fine overall, has energy and is hungry... I can't figure it out?? No diet change.... What should I do?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1832 Recommendations
If she normally eats kibbles, you should offer some wet food or boiled chicken and rice as it may pass easier and stay down; if she is still bringing it up you should visit your Veterinarian since there are various causes for vomiting in dogs which may include obstructions, esophageal disorders (food may not be reaching the stomach), acid reflux, parasites, infections among other causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Zeus
German Shepherd
3 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

I have 3 month old gsd he hasn't eat anything from 11 days . He throws up everything he eats immidately after eating . Even if he drinks water he throws up it immidately. What should i do please help me?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1832 Recommendations
You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination because if Zeus cannot keep down water, it may be indicative of megaesophagus where the esophagus dilates leading to food and water being brought up before they even reach the stomach. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tiny
Pomeranian
4 Months
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Lameness
Vomiting

Medication Used

none

There are works in her vomit and cannot hold anything down.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1832 Recommendations

If Tiny has worms in her vomit, it is best to get her an anthelmintic like praziquantel (or similar product from your local pet shop - availability without prescription dependent on your location) which is suitable for puppies over three weeks of age and over two pounds in weight; if Tiny is vomiting too much to keep it down it would be best to visit your Veterinarian for an alternative method of administration. The vomiting is most likely due to the parasites, if a pet shop anthelmintic is unsuccessful visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have 3 month old gsd he is throwing up everything immidetaly after eating he is not eating anything now and when he drinks water he throws it immidately what should i do???

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