Inducing Vomiting in Dogs

Inducing Vomiting in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention

Most common conditions

Antifreeze Poisoning / Ingestion of Foreign Objects / Poisoning

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Rated as mild conditon

17 Veterinary Answers

Most common conditions

Antifreeze Poisoning / Ingestion of Foreign Objects / Poisoning

Inducing Vomiting in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention

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What is Inducing Vomiting?

Inducing vomiting in your dog should only be undertaken either on the advice of a veterinarian or by a veterinarian, as there are medical conditions that make this unadvisable. Inducing vomiting in a dog is an emergency treatment used to expel a toxic or harmful substance from your dog's gastrointestinal tract, before it can be absorbed or cause damage. It must be undertaken shortly after ingestion, before the substance has passed through the stomach, to be effective.

In an emergency, your veterinarian may recommend you induce vomiting in your dog prior to transporting your dog to the veterinarian when time is critical. In these cases, only induce vomiting as instructed by your veterinarian. Certain poisons or existing medical conditions can be aggravated by this treatment, so it is important that your consult your veterinarian first. If possible, it is preferable to get veterinary treatment as it will be more effective and your pet can be closely monitored by your veterinarian in cases when poisoning has occurred. 

Inducing Vomiting Procedure in Dogs

Induction of vomiting as a treatment to remove a toxic or harmful substance from your dog's gastrointestinal tract needs to be conducted within two to four hours of ingestion of the substance if it is going to be effective.

If your dog has ingested a harmful substance, contact your veterinarian to determine if you need to induce vomiting at home prior to visiting the vet or whether to transport your pet immediately to the vet for treatment. This decision will be based on how long it will take to get to the vet, whether the substance ingested and its toxicity can be identified or requires veterinary diagnosis, and the toxicity or potential damage of the substance ingested. 

If your veterinarian recommends you induce vomiting, the most common method recommended is to administer 3% hydrogen peroxide, by mouth (orally). The usual dosage is 1 teaspoon per 10 pounds of your pet’s weight. It can be administered by a syringe, turkey baster or eye dropper if available. This method usually results in your dog vomiting within 10 to 15 minutes, if it going to be effective. If possible, giving your dog a small meal prior to administering the hydrogen peroxide may help in the treatments effectiveness. If it does not work, it can be repeated once more. If a second attempt is unsuccessful, transport your dog to the veterinarian immediately. Regardless of whether your attempts at inducing vomiting in your dog are successful, your dog should be subsequently treated at veterinarian as vomiting only removes 40-60% of the ingested substance and further treatment of an ingested toxic substance may be required by your veterinarian. If you are unsure what substance your dog has ingested, take a sample of vomit with you to the veterinarian for analysis.

If vomiting is induced at your vet, he or she will administer an emetic that can be more effective than hydrogen peroxide and administer other follow up treatments.

For dogs, your veterinarian will administer apomorphine hydrochloride to induce vomiting. This medication may be administered orally, intravenously, or subcutaneously. It may be administered in a tablet placed under the eyelid (conjunctival sac) which dissolves and is absorbed; it is not as effective when administered intramuscularly. Vomiting usually occurs within 5-10 minutes. If administered using a tablet in the conjunctival (eyelid) membranes, excess dosage not absorbed can be removed when vomiting starts therefore avoiding administering more medication than is necessary. If it is not effective, additional dose are not useful.

Additional treatment with activated charcoal or other medication to prevent absorption of toxins may also be administered by your veterinarian and supportive care provided as necessary.

Efficacy of Inducing Vomiting in Dogs

Inducing vomiting will help minimize the effects of ingestion of a toxic or harmful substance. For the treatment to be useful it must be administered within 2-4 hours of ingestion. Antiemetics only remove about 40 to 60 perent of the stomach's contents, therefore while this is a useful emergency intervention to reduce the effect of a harmful substance being injested, further intervention by a veterinarian will be required. If conditions exist that preclude inducing vomiting, gastric lavage may be another treatment option.

Inducing Vomiting Recovery in Dogs

Recovery from induced vomiting will depend on what substance was induced, its toxicity level, timing of intervention, and how successful the treatment was. 

Apomorphine can cause central nervous system side effects such as excitement or depression. Dehydration can result if vomiting is prolonged. Your dog may require supportive treatment during recovery for central nervous system (CNS) symptoms, dehydration, or organ damage caused by toxicity. A special diet may be recommended by your veterinarian to provide organ support and restore electrolyte balance to your dog. You should monitor your dog for any concerning symptoms and report them to your veterinarian.

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Cost of Inducing Vomiting in Dogs

Treatment for inducing vomiting in your dog can vary widely. Depending on your location, inducing vomiting in your dog can range in cost from $300 to $500. Additional costs associated with treatment of ingestion, e.g. activated charcoal, medications, hospitalization and supportive therapy can range up to $5,000, depending on the severity of your pet’s condition and treatments required.

Dog Inducing Vomiting Considerations

Treatment is only effective shortly after ingestion, usually within 2 hours. CNS stimulation or depression is a side effect of apomorphine and dehydration from vomiting is a risk. Both of these side effects can receive supportive treatment from your veterinarian.

Side effects of peroxide are rare but can include peroxide-induced brain inflammation. 

Animals that are at an increased danger of aspiration have an increased associated risk with emesis treatment of aspiration pneumonia. Dogs with laryngeal paralysis, megaesophagus, upper airway disease, and brachycephalic syndrome may be at increased risk for aspiration during vomiting and treatment with an alternative therapy such as gastric lavage may be considered.

If your dog is already showing symptoms of toxicity that include central nervous system symptoms, they are at an increased risk for aspiration, and as absorption of toxins has already occurred emesis may not be particularly effective.

Be sure to provide your veterinarian with information regarding any medications or conditions your dog has so they can determine the appropriateness of this treatment.

Inducing Vomiting Prevention in Dogs

Dogs are curious creatures. Removing toxic and harmful substances from your dog's environment so they are not apt to sample them or accidentally ingest them will prevent accidental poisonings or ingestions, and eliminate the need to induce vomiting in your dog. Be sure to identify all house and garden plants and check to see if they are toxic to your dog. Many common household and garden plant are not safe for dogs. Avoid giving human food to your dog unless you have checked whether they are appropriate for dogs. Many human foods such as grapes, chocolate, and citrus fruits are toxic to dogs. Remove small choking hazards from your dog's environment and keep all toxic substances such as household cleaners inaccessible to your pets. These precautions will also make your home safer for visitors with children or other pets.

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Inducing Vomiting Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Riot

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Great Dane

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4 Months

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Fair severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

None

My 5 month old puppy who weighs about 45 pounds ate about 4 grapes. I induced vomiting with 3 teaspoons of hydrogen peroxide. She threw up about three times and drank her whole bowl of water. She is currently eating while laying in bed (normal for her). Right before eating she was playing as normal. Is there anything I should watch for?

Sept. 7, 2018

Riot's Owner

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Harris

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Mix

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1 Year

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Mild severity

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1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Vomiting
Coughing

Harris had been vomiting bile and foam off and on all day. As it began to increase later in the evening, I knew he had gotten something lodged. I induced with peroxide and he vomited up our newborn baby’s first hospital hat. He’s had fluid afterward and a small portion of dinner. He’s still coughing in his crate and, last I saw, vomiting up clear liquids. Is this normal for after inducing with peroxide?

July 19, 2018

Harris' Owner

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3320 Recommendations

After inducing vomiting a dog may continue to vomiting for a few hours, rarely do they just vomit once; keep an eye on Harris for the time being and try withholding food and water until he has been an hour or two without vomiting, give him water and if he keeps that down give him small meals to see how he goes. If you have any concerns visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 19, 2018

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Jax

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lab

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3 Years

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Fair severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

None

My dog swallowed 2 long shoelaces tied together, i have given 1 dose of peroxide, he vomited but no strings. Can I give this treatment again? What is the best next step?

July 19, 2018

Jax's Owner

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recommendation-ribbon

3320 Recommendations

Typically you may attempt to induce vomiting two times but by now the time frame for inducing vomiting has passed, you should keep a close eye on Jax for the time being (looking for the shoelaces to be passed in the stool) and looking for any symptoms of a string foreign body; if any symptoms present you should visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 19, 2018

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Kodiak

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Border Collie

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3 Years

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My dog ate a few small rubber bands last night. I induced vomiting with peroxide. He has vomited a few more times today. He has energy and wants to eat/drink/play. He had one BM with a rubber band in it.

June 18, 2018

Kodiak's Owner

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recommendation-ribbon

3320 Recommendations

Inducing vomiting is most effective within an hour or two of ingestion, after this it is an unnecessary process to put an animal through; although a dog may vomit it may not bring all material up. If Kodiak is otherwise OK, I would feed small regular portions of bland food and monitor for any signs of pain or discomfort; if you are not seeing an improvement in the frequency of vomiting or have any concerns visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

June 18, 2018

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Lindsey

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schnauzer

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8 Years

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Mild severity

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0 found helpful

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Mild severity

Has Symptoms

My 36 pound schnauzer ate a 3oz dark chocolate bar , and within 2 hours I rushed her to the vet. They induced vomiting and gave her activated charcoal. Her poop is black and she seems very tired. Is this normal?

June 15, 2018

Lindsey's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

The medication that they use to induce vomiting is quite sedating, and the charcoal will turn her stool black, yes. Since I don't know the details of her visit, it would be a good idea to call the clinic and make sure, but those things seem normal to me. I'm glad that you acted quickly and got her in!

June 15, 2018

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Sandy and Charlotte

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Vizsla and Goldendoodle

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9 Years

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Fair severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

Had just came in from work, found a bottle of 81mg bayer aspirin on the floor, torn to pieces with aspirin all around it. I have two dogs and didn't know who the guilty party was, so induced vomiting in both dogs, they did vomit, all foam, found no pills in any of it, there was bits and pieces of their breakfast which was over eight hours before I forced them to vomit. Not sure if any were ingested, they have a coating and I do not see any discoloration on carpet where I found the bottle and pills, also pills were not wet from salvia. Would it be safe to let them ride out the night without taking to Emergency Vet? And what do I look for, and how to keep them comfortable.

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Sue

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Shepherd

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10 Years

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Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

None

How long do I have to hold water and food for after inducing vomit with peroxide? My 85-90 lb shepherd ate a whole sticky note pad and I gave her 5-6 teaspoons of peroxide and sure enough there was the whole wad of sticky notes in her vomit.

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Willow

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Bernedoodle

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2 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

None

Okay my dog has eaten her fair share of things but we never find the right way to give her hydrogen peroxide we have been trying for an hour and a half she is at least 60(Haven't had her weighed recently) and she is terrified of peroxide. My family working together try to get the peroxide in her mouth... It is the most frustrating thing I have experienced. What should I do? We have literally tried everything the only thing that works is distracting her and squirting it in her mouth does anyone have a better way? So far we have gotten some but she keeps spilling it and she has gagged but not actually vomited... She is so stubborn. Please help.

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Zuko

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Pointer Bay

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8 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

None After A Hour

My dog zuko ate abunch of sauted onions,less then 1/4 a cup. Was able to induce vomiting with hydrogen peroxide. He is about 55 pounds. It seems like they came out whole. Cant afford a trip to the emergency vet and banfield wont see him since I've already induced vomiting. Will he be ok?

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Charlie

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Chihuahua

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1 Year

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Fair severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

Sleepy

I thought My 8-10 lb chihuahua ate a grape, he didn’t he pushed it under the couch. I was so worried I ran to the gas station and bought hydrogen peroxide 3%. I mixed it with ice cream, 1/4 teaspoon. Then about 25 minutes later I did the same thing. He wasn’t throwing up, so I gave him 1/2 teaspoon with some water. He never threw up, I later looked and seen the grape under the couch. I gave him bread and water after to absorb the hydrogen peroxide. I just want to know if his stomach will be okay after the hydrogen peroxide.

Cannanine