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What are Natural Seizure Remedies?

Because they are inherently unanticipated, seizures often take a family and their pet by surprise, and yet seizures are one of the most frequently-occurring health issues found in dogs. A seizure can be just as frightening to experience as it is to witness and many pet-owners express helplessness when it comes to finding aid. 

While medications can be prescribed by a veterinarian, some dog owners dislike the side effects that go with them. Due to this fact, natural or homeopathic remedies are becoming a popular option chosen by many pet owners. Any method or procedure is considered natural if it exclusively involves a tactic or source that is naturally occurring. A significant benefit of natural remedies is that they can be practiced in the comfort of one’s home. 

Natural Seizure Remedies Procedure in Dogs

There are several natural remedies and methods designed specifically to prevent or stop seizures in dogs, some of the more common and potentially most effective are:

Essential Fatty Acids  

Pet owners and veterinarians alike recommend routinely introducing fatty acids into a dog’s diet. Omega-3 doses can be bought in pills, sprays, or oils. The recommended dosage varies by dog’s size, but one tablespoon per fifty pounds is standard. Several studies both on humans and dogs have shown that fatty acids are not proven to stop seizures, but may improve a patient’s seizure threshold (tendency to seize). 

Dietary Changes

Dye used in foods are linked to causing seizures in dogs, particularly a dye called red dye 40. Pet owners should investigate dog foods and treats before trusting them. Several other foods are proven to be dangerous and toxic to dogs as well and could be causing seizures, such as onion, garlic, bell peppers, chocolate, or grapes. 

Homeopathic Oils 

Oils are a popular choice as they give a pet-owner the ability to administer medicine to their pet during a seizure. Due to the fact that seizures cause the jaw and teeth to clamp, attempting to give a dog medicine in the middle of a seizure is difficult or impossible. Natural oils can be rubbed into the skin or even on the gums of a seizing animal, giving them instant results and potentially ending their seizure and pain. Thus, homeopathic substances are another natural remedy to seizures, such as: 

  • Belladonna 
  • Aconite
  • Choline or Cholidin

Acupressure

Acupressure is said to help ease an animal’s tension during their seizure. For example, the pressure point at the base of a dog’s nose, right above their upper lip can be pressed, with moderate pressure, for up to a minute.

Ice Pack 

Some seizures are caused due to overheating. In this case, an ice pack applied to the back of a seizing dog and gently rubbing it up and down their spine may help the seizure’s grip lessen more quickly.

Melatonin  

In animals that experience night seizures, administering melatonin (the naturally-occurring chemical released by the brain to induce sleep) can help.

Honey 

If a dog has diabetes or is hypoglycemic, a teaspoon of honey once or twice a day, depending on frequency or severity of seizures, is suggested. 

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Efficacy of Natural Seizure Remedies in Dogs

Every animal varies in their seizure threshold. A high threshold indicates an animal’s predisposition to not experience or frequently experience seizures, while a low threshold indicates the opposite. When it comes to treating seizures with natural remedies and methods, the most success gained will be with a dog whose seizure threshold is high. 

In some cases, a dog’s heritage will predispose them to developing epilepsy. In this case, most veterinarians will prescribe medication in order to reach the desired result: pet experiences less severe seizures and less frequently. Therefore, the efficacy of natural remedies varies widely and is typically utilized as more of a preventative measure than a wholly-healing treatment.

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Natural Seizure Remedies Recovery in Dogs

Due to the fact that natural remedies and methods do not require surgery or high doses of medication, there is no recovery period associated with the treatment itself.

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Cost of Natural Seizure Remedies in Dogs

Most natural seizure remedies, such as homeopathic oils, essential fatty acid pills, and other natural medicines, like melatonin, can cost anywhere between $15 to $40 per bottle or package. However, it’s highly recommended by veterinarians that the root cause of seizures be determined before treating a dog with solely natural resources. Because seizures may be brought on by serious issues, such as, thyroid problems or even cancer, affected dogs should undergo a rigorous exam to determine the source of its seizures.

In most cases, the cause of seizures can be determined by blood work. This will typically cost anywhere between $150 to $300. Sometimes a veterinarian will recommend additional tests, especially if the blood work comes back normal and seizures continue. At this juncture, a veterinarian team may perform a CT scan on the animal, which can cost anywhere between $500 to $1,000 depending on the size of the dog as well as its need for sedation during the procedure. 

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Dog Natural Seizure Remedies Considerations

Any of these natural remedies for dogs can be helpful, but it’s important to note that the cause of a dog’s seizures will determine their risk level. Any animal experiencing long or frequent seizures should see a veterinarian immediately. Natural remedies are designed to help lessen frequency or severity of seizures, not alleviate them. Extreme cases may require prescribed medication to avoid long-term brain damage in the dog. 

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Natural Seizure Remedies Prevention in Dogs

Seizure prevention can be a tricky science as there are many reasons for their occurrence, but any of the following steps can be taken to help prevent and/or ease the severity or duration of a seizure:

Seek a veterinarian’s advice

A dog that experiences seizures, whether the episodes are frequent or infrequent, should be taken to a medical professional and undergo a series of tests. This is always the first step in helping an epileptic animal. 

Know dietary needs

The elimination of toxic and seizure-inducing foods from a dog’s diet is the surest method of preventing seizures. Similarly, a pet owner should know any allergies of their pet, as seizures may occur as a bodily response to exposure.

Avoid overheating

Dogs will pant heavily when they are uncomfortably hot. Pet owners should avoid exposing their dogs to long walks in high temperatures or leaving them in cramped, hot spaces or outside without water or shade.

Introduce homeopathic products

Many natural herbs and plants aim to calm tension in the body, making them great aides to pets during a seizure attack. 

Natural remedies are not cited as the most reliable treatment for seizures in dogs by veterinarians, but rather as preventative measures that may help. In the end, a dog who is on a healthy, routine diet, free of toxins or any foods they may be allergic to, as well as not put in situations that could lead to overheating (left in a hot car or backyard without shade, taken on a long walk on a hot day, etc.) is less likely to develop severe seizures. 

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Natural Seizure Remedies Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Ask a Vet

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Rhodesian ridge back

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Fifteen Years

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17 found helpful

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Seizures

My sons dog is having seizures and drooling and peeing himself. Two of them in less than 24 hours. How can we help him?

Dec. 30, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Sara O. DVM

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17 Recommendations

Hello, if he is had more than 2 seizures in 24 hours, he needs to be on seizure medication. It would be best for him to go to the emergency vet today. They can give him medication to help him stop having seizures. WIth him being 15 years old most likely these seizures are coming from a brain tumor or other issue with his brain. They can help determine the cause of these seizures. With seizures, the more your dog has the more likely they are to be very bad and he may start having a seizure and never stop. I would recommend going to the emergency vet today.

Jan. 1, 2021

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Pit Bull

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Two Years

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7 found helpful

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Seizures

Please help my 1 1/2 ur old pit mix, 72hrs ago started having seizures and has had 23 of them as of 5:34pm today

Dec. 15, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Linda S. MVB MRCVS

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7 Recommendations

I'm sorry to hear this. Seizures can occur for many reasons in a young dog including toxin ingestion, liver disease, an infection etc. This many fits is a real concern and he needs to be assessed by a vet urgently. The concern is that he may have a prolonged seizure that causes permanent damage. The vet will examine him and will likely run some blood tests so we can try to determine what is going on. He will also be started on anti seizure medicine.

Dec. 15, 2020

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Chihuahua

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Six Years

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2 found helpful

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Seizures

What can I give my dog for seizures without using vet prescribed medications. How much dosage should I give my 10 pound dog.

Oct. 1, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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2 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Without a more thorough neurologic exam, I can't say what might help him, and the prescription medication to control seizures is quite inexpensive and effective. The best thing to do for him would be to have an examination with a veterinarian, make sure that that is what is happening in that he doesn't have other neurologic problems, and then discuss with them what medications might help. If there are over the counter medications that can be used, I'm sure that they will discuss that with you, although I have not seen any that really work for seizures. I hope that everything goes well for him.

Oct. 1, 2020

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Pierre

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Cavapoo

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5 Years

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Mild severity

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Seizures

Hi. I have a 5 year old Cavapoo who began with fly biting episodes within his first year. After a work up from a neuro vet, he has what is called partial seizure disorder. This is not uncommon for Cavalier King Charles Spaniels apparently. He has been on phenobarbital 2x/day for 4 years. The dose has been increased once and we monitor his phenobarbital serum level q 6 months. The past two times it has come back low but I am hesitant to increase the pheno for numerous reasons. Purina Neuro food was suggested and I understand the MCTs are good, but the food is not the quality of what I give him now. He currently is on Natural Balance Lmtd Ingredient which is more natural than most food with no wheat. What can you recommend in terms of natural supplements without changing his food??

Aug. 21, 2018

Pierre's Owner

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0 Recommendations

Whilst I appreciate your concerns with food, grains and other ingredients are not as bad as pet owners believe and there are very very few dogs which actually have true issues from grains; plus it is important to focus on what is important for Pierre. There are no specific supplements which I can recommend which would balance this out since each patient is different and it is a balancing act sometimes to tweak everything to get the best result; but if you’re looking for an holistic approach you should consult a Veterinarian certified in alternative therapies. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Aug. 21, 2018

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Millie

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Labrador Retriever

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4 Years

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Moderate severity

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4 found helpful

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Seizures

We have a 4 y/o lab named Millie. She started seizure about a month ago. We have had her to the vet, did blood and urine, everything was negative. We have since started doing homework but there is a plethora of info out there. We started her on a new diet Purina Pro neuro (designed for dogs who have seizures, we are giving her Milk Thistle and I have started making homemade treats. We have been giving her honey post idis, but she is ravenous!! We really would like to do a more homeopathic approach first before pharmaceutical. what do you think of CBD oil for dogs with seizure issues.

May 20, 2018

Millie's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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4 Recommendations

I personally have not seen a dog with seizures respond to anything other than medical treatment, but there may be others who have had success. If her seizures are frequent or severe, it may be better to start her on medication, then try to wean her down if you decide to try alternate therapies. Since your veterinarian has seen her and knows her situation, you can also discuss this with them, as they may have had different experiences than I have. I hope that Millie is okay.

May 20, 2018

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Stan

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pit boxer

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4 Years

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Mild severity

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1 found helpful

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Mild severity

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Seizures

My dog started having seizures one week ago and gets anywhere from 4 to 10 a day. They are very mild and dont last but a minute so my dr doesnt think the medicine will be worth the side effect. He says the seizures look scary but that's as far as it goes, just a look. All test came up fine. I just dont like how many hes having a day does anyone know any natural foods or medicines he can take that lower the seizures to at least once a month?

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Buddy

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Chihuahua

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5 Years

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Mild severity

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1 found helpful

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Jerking
Glazed Look

My dog buddy starting having seizures a little over a year ago. I thought it was an environmental factor. Since we have moved they happen less frequently but still happening. I started using essential oil Frankincense on him behind his ears and have noticed a small improvement. We did blood work it came back normal. I dont know what is causing the seizures but I hope we can stop them. He is a bit over weight. We haven't changed his dog food we use Beyond dog food, it's all he has ever had. Not sure If i should use a different dog food or try doing medicine. The Vet said meds are our best chance but i have doubt. Any help is appreciated

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Gordie

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Pit bull/Bull dog

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5 Years

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Moderate severity

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1-2 Seizure Per Week

I have a Pit Bull/Bull dog mix. He is blue in color. He was also a rescue dog. We’ve had him for about a year, & seizures started about a month after we took him in. I would say that 90% or more of his seizures are at night. He has had seizures’ in the evening hours & morning. But very few. He first was prescribed phenyl barbitol. Then after going 3-4 weeks without any seizures, they would start again. I suggested a blood test for a low thyroid, which my Vet. Did do, & did come back as low. He was then put on Thyrozine, to try getting his level increased. After going 2 weeks without any seizures, we started weening the phenyl barbitol. After another 4 weeks he was off it, & seizure free. Gordie went another full week, then they suddenly came back, no particular reason. The week the seizures returned, he had 3 more, going about a day or 2 in between each one. We even had some nights of 2 seizures in a short time. Within a hour of one another. I also want to add that Gordies seizures are all somewhat short. With most of them lasting less than than 4 mins. During a seizure he has foaming at the mouth, thrashing the rear legs, urinating, then followed by a couple minutes of a zombie like state, that is enough to scare anyone. Then without any indication, will snap out of it, & have the demeaner of someone that doesn’t know what just happened. There was 1 occasion that he came out of a seizure, & was literally afraid of my Wife & I. He acted as if we beat him, or screamed at him for something. But, we have never, ever done any such thing. He did eventually come back to us, but that was probably the scariest one of all. He was very freightened by something that time. As of right now, Gordie is still having 1-2 seizures a week. Each lasting from 3-4 mins. Each seizure is typical of the next, that being almost exactly as I described earlier in my story. The medicine he is currently taking is all taken in 2 doses. The morning & night, we do our best to make them 12 hours apart daily. He takes 125mg of phenyl Barbitol. 2x’s a day, 100mg of Zonisamide 2x’s a day, & .6 mg of Thyrozine 2x’s a day. As of right now, we are trying CBD oil, but in all honesty it doesn’t look real promising. Please help!

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Howie

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Black Lab Mix

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Two Years

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Moderate severity

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1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Seizures

Howie began having seizures about a year ago, and has about one a month - lasting about 3-6 minutes. He is completely normal both before and after. The vet has prescribed both Phenobarb and Keppra, and he takes medication 3x a day but still has a monthly episode. I think he has also become anxious around strangers - perhaps a side effect of Keppra? I know anxiety and agitation is a side effect in humans. We have tried CBD oil as a supplement to calm him when we have people over, and have had wonderful results - BUT, what dosage is appropriate? How and should we use it or other natural remedies over prescribed drugs?

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