Ascites Average Cost

From 569 quotes ranging from $500 - 6,000

Average Cost

$1,500

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What are Ascites?

If you notice swelling or tenderness in your cat’s abdomen, this could be a sign of fluid build up, which is indicative of an underlying health condition.

The buildup of fluids in the body is known as edema unless it occurs in the abdomen, in which case it is called ascites. Fluid buildup can put pressure on the cat’s stomach and chest, causing difficulty with eating or breathing. Ascites can be caused by a wide variety of health conditions ranging in severity, so although the fluid can be easily removed by a vet, treatment will focus on the cause of the fluid accumulation.

Symptoms of Ascites in Cats

Symptoms of ascites in cats may begin slowly, but then build up over time as more fluid collects in the abdomen. The symptoms your cat exhibits will depend on the underlying cause of  the fluid build-up. Some of the symptoms you may notice include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Coughing
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Weakness
  • Fever

Causes of Ascites in Cats

A number of different health conditions can cause fluid to start building up in the abdomen, most of which are very serious and require the immediate attention of a vet. Some of the conditions that may cause ascites include:

  • Abdominal organ failure
  • Trauma
  • Right-sided heart failure
  • Cancer
  • Nephritic syndrome (an inflammatory kidney condition)
  • Peritonitis, or inflammation of the abdominal lining

Diagnosis of Ascites in Cats

Take your cat to a veterinarian as soon as you notice any symptoms of ascites. Discuss what symptoms you have noticed with the vet, and if your cat has experienced any physical trauma recently, be sure to mention this as well.

Although the vet should be able to identify excessive fluid in the abdomen just by feeling the area, more tests will need to be run to determine the cause. First, a urinalysis and chemistry profile will be performed to see how the liver and kidneys are functioning. An ultrasound of the abdomen may also be performed to take a closer look at the organs.

The vet may also need to remove a small sample of the fluid to look for the presence of bacteria or blood. This procedure is known as a peritoneal fluid analysis, and will help the vet get to the bottom of what is causing the buildup. 

X-rays of the chest and abdomen may also be performed to look for signs of trauma or tumors. If the vet sees any masses, a biopsy may be required to determine if the tumor is cancerous. 

Because partial heart failure could cause fluid build up, the vet may also suggest an EKG to determine if the heart is functioning properly.

The results of all of these tests will help the vet pinpoint the exact cause of the fluid buildup so he can create an effective treatment plan.

Treatment of Ascites in Cats

Treatment will first focus on making the cat more comfortable, and then will shift to treat the underlying cause of the fluid buildup. If the cat is struggling to breathe, a catheter will be placed into his abdomen to drain the fluid and allow him to breathe easier. The cat may be fitted with an oxygen mask during this time to help him breathe while the procedure takes place. 

Diuretics may also be administered to help with the fluid removal, however, these drugs can cause potassium levels in the blood to drop, which can lead to serious side effects.

After the fluid has been removed, the vet will need to treat the underlying cause to prevent it from building up again. Treatment will vary greatly depending on the cause. For example, peritonitis can be treated with antibiotics, however, a cancerous tumor may need to be removed via surgery. Surgery may also be required if the cause is a ruptured organ due to injury. Unfortunately, some causes of ascites are untreatable or very difficult to treat, including heart and liver failure. 

Recovery of Ascites in Cats

Fluid can easily be removed from the cat’s abdomen, but the cat’s recovery will depend on the underlying cause of ascites. To increase your cat’s chances of recovering fully, follow the vet’s orders closely and schedule a follow-up appointment with the vet so he can assess how your cat is healing. 

The vet may ask you to change your cat’s diet to help prevent the accumulation of fluid. One of the most important changes is lowering your cat’s salt intake, which will reduce bloating and water retention.

If ascites was caused by trauma, it may be wise to keep your cat indoors so you can keep a closer eye on him and prevent further injuries. You will also need to keep other pets away from your cat while he recovers if trauma is the underlying cause.

Ascites Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Koda
domestic short hair
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy

My cat Koda's stomach recently balooned up and the vet told us it was ascites. The vet took a fluid sample and blood sample and couldn't figure out what was the cause and the animal hospital we took him to, did a sonogram and couldn't figure out the cause either. We haven't had any other tests done for him because we don't have the money to get all tests done. They took a liter of fluid out but we think it's building up again. In terms of symptoms, he's eating his soft food fine, but he's not eating his hard food and he's less active but other then that and looking like a pear from above, he seems fine. Is there anything you'd suggest us try?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
The problem is that it is important to determine the cause of the ascites as any treatment is dependent on the underlying cause; however possible causes may include liver disease, hypoalbuminemia, heart failure among other causes. But as I mentioned, without an underlying cause it is difficult to give any guidance for treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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His name is Oreo. We call him Mr Brown
American Shorthair
17 Years
Moderate condition
-1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

sensitive skin.

Medication Used

no meds

I have a 17 yr old male cat who is recently suffering from ascites. About a month ago he developed a hot spot on his hind leg which was cultured and he was given a shot of antibiotics. Blood work was performed which showed elevated liver and kidney levels. the hot spot has healed and he seems fine except he's beginning to be uncomfortable from the fluid buildup. A brief ultrasound confirmed the fluid. No further tests were recommended and I was told to bring him home and love him as we wait for the inevitable. I'm worried that there may be more which could be done to help him. I don't have a lot of money but would like to not just give up on him without a little more information.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1519 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Common causes for fluid buildup in the abdomen include liver disease, heart disease, and protein losing diseases that might be related to kidney or intestinal disease. If Mr. Brown is 17 years old, there are many possibilities for what might be going on with him. If he is generally doing well but seems to be uncomfortable with the fluid buildup in his belly, he might benefit short term from having some of that fluid removed, even if you don't know the underlying cause. That isn't a long term solution, but might make him feel better in the short term. You can talk with your veterinarian more about that option, as well as any others that they might have, as they have examined him and know more his specific situation.

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Baby
Domestic shorthair
17 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

my cat was diagnosed with Kidney disease last march ..he is now 17.5 years of age ..and has otherwise been in good health for his entire life. weve had him on fortekor tablets (benazepril hydrochloride) also potassium powder which has helped him tremendously for 10 months... since then he has now developed ascites in his abdomen...this cat is amazing he is still eating and drinking ..the vet told me to have him on plasmalyte subcut fluids 3x weekly BUT he is eating and drinking ..should he STILL be on subcut fluids if hes eating and drinki g >> im worried these excess fluids will contribute to TOO much fluid in his body ??? are the two things related ? The vet tapped teh ascites last week and we determined theres NO cancer .. the fluids were just transudates ..... question ...should i keep having the transudates drained every week ? keep him on subcut fluids or not ? and is THERE ANYTHING ELSE we can do about the ascites ?? very much appreciate this second opinion ...

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
Whether or not an animal is drinking is not an indication of whether or not they require fluids, they require fluids if there is a deficit in water intake or there are signs of dehydration; if you have concerns about the fluids you should ask your Veterinarian since I haven’t examined Baby and cannot make an informed decision regarding fluid therapy. Generally fluids are indicated when the is inadequate intake of water or there are signs of dehydration, then Veterinarian will then work out the deficit and calculate the amount of fluids required to meet daily needs; the ascites most likely is irrelevant in this equation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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YODA
Siamese
5 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Loss Of Appetite, water in abdomen,
Loss of Appetite

Dear Doctor,

My kitten, Yoda, is 4.5 months old (siamese). His sister died a few weeks ago and the Vet summed it up to be FIP as there was eye discharge, nasal blockage, difficulty in breathing, fever, loss of appetite, failing liver and ofcourse water in the abdomen.

Yoda seemed fine through this period, but since the last 10 days his body has begun acting up- fever and loss of appetite. Ive taken him to the vet several times and with IV meds and fluids he seems to do fine. Not his playful self, but stable. However, in one recent visit the doc caught glimpse of a swollen belly and Ultrasound showed there was water in the abdomen and an affected liver.

Im not certain where this leaves us now? No one says its FIP but no one knows whats going on. The only advise I get is to keep the drip and IV meds on and maybe liver supplements. Could this be FIP? If yes, what should be my plan? I knoow theres no cure and its difficult to diagnose but as a parent, i just want to know what I can do to help my little one.

Thank you.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1519 Recommendations
I'm sorry that Yoda is having these problems. FIP is very difficult to diagnose, and not a treatable disease, sadly, as you know. If your veterinarian is able to get a sample of the fluid and analyze it, that may give a clue as to whether he has FIP or a liver related disease. If he responds to therapy and medication, he may pull through this is if it not related to FIP. If it is, you sadly will just need to keep him comfortable for as long as possible. I hope that things go well for him.

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Eclipse
American Short Hair
24 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Abdominal Distension

The family cat , a black ASH age about 2 years, fixed ,male , from Humane society. Seen a year ago by vet given good bill of health at that time.
Began getting a big round swollen belly that makes him look like a fuzzy bowling ball . He has become somewhat lethargic between spurts of high energy , drinking 2 -3 x as much water as he used to , has laboured raspy breathing when at rest, has stopped eating his normal daily amount, has possibly been exposed to worms eating live rats or possible dead poisoned rats. Indoor cat, fed adult Science Diet dry kibbles, and fed daily can of Fancy Feast wet food.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
You should visit a Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination since an enlarged abdomen may be due to liver disease, heart failure, kidney disease, poisoning, cancer among other causes; without examining Eclipse I cannot say what the cause is and a year since the last visit to a Veterinarian is a long time ago. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lulu
Dont kno
7 Years
Fair condition
-1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Breathing Difficulties

My cat breathing seems heavier than befor , i suspect that she has ascitis although there is no signs of abd discomfort loss off apetite or weight gain or loss , her abd does seem tense but when i pet her abd she doesnt show discomfort how can i be sure?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
When a cat’s abdomen is tense, it can be difficult to palpate and determine if there is fluid or any masses in the abdomen especially if it isn’t something you do every day. If Lulu is having breathing difficulty and you suspect that she may have ascites (we would normally see an increase in weight due to the weight of the fluid) you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side since she has difficulty breathing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Meisha
Greek Aegean
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Appetite loss, vomiting
Appetite loss, intermittent vomiting

Hello! My 12 year old cat recently had a problem eating. He would be interested in food but unable to keep it down. This has been happening for about a month. He lost half his body weight going from 14 pounds to 8 pounds! He has a history of mast cell disease and diabetes (though recently he regulated himself) He had an xray done today and it showed a growth in his abdomen and fluid buildup around his heart and lungs. The vet suggested I put him down or see a specialist to receive furthur diagnosis. I asked if she could give him a fluid shot to help him get some energy and she agreed and gave me some urgent care cat food to feed him in a dropper/syringe. But we came home and he has eaten on his own without the syringe and is drinking water and peeing a lot. My question is, is this positive? Can the fluid buildup he has around his organs be eliminated through his urine? I know that CHF and things like it in humans is treated that way so could kitty be trying to help his own body get rid of the fluid? Also he has eaten more today than he has all week...so is this also a positive sign? In light of the growth would abdominocentesis be advisable from a specialist to make him more comfortable while we assess his treatment and surgical options?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
A diuretic will only do so much to remove fluid from the abdomen and is a short term solution in animals with the effects tapering in efficacy over time; the mass will continue to cause problems unless it is removed or treated directly. The increased appetite may be just down to a change of food and we need to see a consistent appetite change before we can chalk it up to a positive change. Abdominocentesis is generally performed to remove fluid from the abdomen so that it may provide relief to a patient and for it to be examined for cells and other anomalies which may assist in a diagnosis; remember fluid may return quickly after abdominocentesis regardless of diuretic therapy. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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May
Unsure
11 Weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Fluid In Abdomen

My 11 week old kitten has build up a large accumulation of fluid between her 9th and 10th week. We took her to the vet. He analyzed some fluid from her and said it was some type of liver issue, with compression of the organ causing its dysfunction. He drained the fluid yesterday but it seems her belly is already filling a bit today. He ruled out FIP. There is a lack of diagonistic technology where I live, and he isn't able to determine the exact cause. Are there any suggestions for possible causes or treatments? She seems totally healthy other wise, eating and drinking well, no toliet issues-going regulary, etc, playful, curious, generally happy. I hate to think of putting her down, but not sure if there is much to be done. He put her on steriods. Would it make sense to drain one more time to let the steriods work?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
There are many different causes for ascites (abdominal fluid) which may include liver disease, low blood albumin, infections (like FIP), cancer (unlikely in a cat this age) among other causes. Without examining May and having some basic blood tests, it is difficult to make a specific diagnosis; however diuretics may help in the meantime to increase renal clearance of fluid. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Olive
American Shorthair
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargic

Hi Yes she has had this for years. Recent trip to a vet suggest to change her food and feed less
She has half cup bench and field dry and 3oz of canned tuna. She purrs and cleans but is more lethargic and seems like it is bothering her. Should I get another opinion? First vet said to give her a rabies vac and lower cal food and that is it.
Thank you

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1519 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm sorry that olive is having this problem. if she has indeed had ascites for years, it would be a good idea to try and figure out why she is having ascites, as that isn't normal for a healthy cat. It is never a bad idea to get a second opinion on complicated cases, and if you haven't gotten a diagnosis or plan for her to deal with her ascites, it would be good to have her examined by a veterinarian that will help you find out why this is happening. I hope that she does well.

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Socks
European Shorthair
16 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Swollen Abdomen
Swollen Abdomen, lack of appetite

My cat is a big eater loves food. His appetite has diminished his belly is swollen and hard. Blood test came back normal, x ray came back normal. We have an appointment for an ultrasound. If his kidney function is normal on blood work, blood cell count normal etc. What else could it be.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1519 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I am so glad that Socks' bloodwork came back normal! An ultrasound is a great next step to determine why his belly is swollen. Hopefully that will give you some answers. I hope that all goes well with him.

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Somalezul
European Shorthair
1 Year
Serious condition
4 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Ascite

My male cat has dysplasia of tricuspid valve and has ascite. He is 1 year old and weights about 9 pounds. He takes 1 ml of injectable Lasix every 8 hours but he still doesn’t eliminate all the liquid he drinks. His veterinarian suggested puncture and I am desperate because the cat can’t take it any more. Please tell me what other DIURETIC - MORE EFFICIENT - I could at least try ?
I know he is not going to recover. I know he is going to die. But maybe if I can keep him around for just a little while without make him suffer too much.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
Prognosis for tricuspid valve dysplasia is poor and there is only medical management and abdominocentesis for treatment; furosemide and ACE inhibitors are normally prescribed with the furosemide possibly being used in combination with another diuretic (like spironolactone) which has a different mechanism of action than furosemide but would need to be discussed with your Veterinarian as they need to determine if the treatment is appropriate for Somalezul. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/tricuspid-valve-dysplasia

My female is 16 has hyperthytoidism & has fluid in stomach too. Vet drained 640 ml. Did abdominal ultrasound & biopsy on stomach fluid & spleen fluid. All inconclusive!vet recommends putting her down as quality of life us unknown. I am distraught. Any thoughts

Hi, yes my vet says the same. Its most likely heart failure caused by the thyroid issue. Have the cat started on a duretic pill and then have fluid drained when it gets exsessivly bloated

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Gadoo
Ragdoll
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Poor Appetite
Lethargy
Acsites

My cat has fluid in her lungs and abdomen. The vet told me it’s serious even though he couldn’t diagnose what my cat has with just x rays and blood work. He did say her heart didn’t look great in the X-ray and hinted at heart disease. He suggested putting her down when she becomes too uncomfortable and I agree. I’m not one to keep taking my cat to the vet for treatment because she absolutely hates it there. She isn’t an easy cat to give medicine too either. All I want to know is if there is anything I can do at home to help. Any special diet? Do I encourage exercise? Also if acsites ever goes away on its own? We never drained the fluid so I don’t know if it’s blood either.

On a side note, my cat had gotten into a bad fight 6 weeks ago she had an abscess that cleared up with antibiotics. The fluid buildup and lethargy started right after this fight. The vet told me that the fight and her symptoms now are unrelated. But the bite wound was on the upper part of her shoulder, could the fight be related to the fluid build up now?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1519 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. There isn't a home therapy for ascites, sadly. Unless the cause of the fluid buildup is resolved, the fluid will continue to build up. If the fluid is pus, it may be related to the fight wound, but without seeing Gadoo, I can't say for sure what the cause might be. I hope that you are able to keep her comfortable for a little while longer.

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sada
Indian
24 Days
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

stinky smell on genital area.

Medication Used

Monocef

My kitten is only 24 days old, and I feel a stinky smells from her genital area. Her abdomen is also not in normal shape, its big. She is unable to eat properly. Is there any medicin to help her? should I use lasix to remove her abdominal fluid? I feed them with home made kmr. is that ok with them?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
Given Sada’s age, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as there are a few different possible conditions which may be causing these symptoms; infections, parasites, liver issues, congenital disorders among other causes may cause these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Coffee
Domestic shorthair
8 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Decreased Appetite
Abdominal fluid accumulation
Difficulty Urinating
Lethargic

My 8 month old male domestic shorthair kitten was recently diagnosed with E. Coli in his urine and today the x-ray report showed a fluid build up in his abdominal cavity. He is eating way less than he used to and is very lethargic and is spending most of his time sleeping. He was a very playgul kitty before this. Also he is having difficulty in urinating and sometimes groaning in pain while sitting down. What can be the cause of this? What can I do?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1519 Recommendations
Fluid buildup in the abdomen is very worrisome, especially in a young cat. I'm not sure what is going on with his urination, but it is important to be in communication with your veterinarian. i hope that he is okay.

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Bakouzy
shiraz
8 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Fluid In Abdomen

My cat is 8 years old male. The condition started a month ago before that he was fine. The condition started by poisoning due to insect repellent then severe soft tissue inflammation and vertebral column stenosis due to wrong movement during injection. The condition was treated by metronidazole, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory and vitamin B. He was getting perfectly well. Then 2 days after that I noticed him breathing with difficulty and having tender, bloated abdomen filled with fluids and having diarrhea twice which is black in color. The vet said that he is having bad stage liver impairment and gave him silymarin and ursodeoxycholic acid but nothing to get rid of the excessive fluids. I’m asking what can be done more

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
Without examining Bakouzy it is difficult to say what specific symptomatic and supportive care would be needed, however if there is fluid accumulating in the abdomen a diuretic may be indicated but it is also important to determine the specific cause of the liver disease. The liver support (silymarin and ursodeoxycholic acid) should help to bring the liver enzymes down but the rest is down to your Veterinarian’s judgement to get Bakouzy stable. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Mari
Cat mixed breed
13 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Ascites

my cat is now 13 years old and out of the blue has water in belly but not lungs, blood test has come back, red cells are a Little out but there is Nothing my Vet can put a finger on to treat her. Shes had antibotics and 2 water drains. After the last drain she droped water from her belly for over 8 hours on the Floor the Color was milky and sometimes clear. As soon as the water in her belly went down, she started to over drink water and within 2 days her belly is not only back but larger. Shes Eating small amounts of Food every 2 Hours and she now has Trouble with breathing. we had her at 6 weeks old with her brother, both where unwanted kittens, at 6 months both where ill and close to death, blood test Shows FIP contact/carrier, we had luck and they both pulled through. Now at a loss do not know what to do! as she only has water in belly could she have a drain fitted to let the water Keep driping out?
Or is it time to let her go?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
It is difficult to say what the specific cause is, a sample of the fluid should be sent for examination to look for any signs of cells or other indicators which may help indicate an underlying cause. After the next draining I would recommend an x-ray to look for signs of any masses in the abdomen to determine if there are any tumours present. A permanent drain would not be a good idea as any opening into the abdominal cavity would potentially open the door for infection. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

The Ascites has now got into Mari's lungs.We had no time for a second opionion. Today her heart is racing and she is Fighting for breath. She has looked at me with sad eyes , it is her way to let me know It's time for me to stop fighting for her and to let her go. With sadness I now say, our Wonderful Girl is with the angels.
We still do not know what caused the Ascites, it came on fast, Drainage of the fluid lasted for a very short time, in fact within Hours the fluid was back, and she started to drink more water.Blood test update, still does not Show where the Problem came from, just that her red cells where a Little low and it was not FIP, and she had just been wormed.
Thank you for trying to help.

Love from our Angel Mari and her Mum

Mari's OP cancelled as the Vet says he cannot do anything for her. He has taken a sample of fluid for Tests, still cannot give an answer to what is wrong, just that it is not FIP.
All he says is Keep an eye on her breathing, when that becomes stressful for her, put her to Sleep. My heart is Breaking, the only Thing I can now do is to try and find a new Vet and ask for a second opinion.

Hallo
Thank you for you info.
I have passed this onto her Vet and today she is having the fluid drained from her belly, to be sent to the lab. She will then have an x.ray Her Vet thinks he will also go in to have a look at all her Organs.
Our Wonderful Mari, has now to be Hand fed, not because she will not eat but because the fluid in her belly will not allow her to eat lying or sitting down, because of this, I am now feeding her more protin Foods, red meat, chicken, eggs, sardines, no tinned pet food or dried cat Food, and all the water she can drink. Till now all her blood Tests are giving no clear signs of what the Problem is and the fluid that droped from her belly is mostly clear with a Little milky Color, and not the Color yellow that I am told is FIP. She is still playing, but gets out of breath, still the loving Family cat, she is not showing any signs that she wants to give up, so as Long as she is not in pain, we will Keep Fighting for her.
I will Keep you updated.

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Sammy
short hair
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

not eating, fluid in the abdomen

I just had my 14 year old kitty to the vet because he wasn't pooping for over 5 days. Blood work and xrays revealed he has fluid in his abdomen. When some fluid was withdrawn it was pinkish in color but not sticky indicating internal bleeding but not infection. Without getting a full ultrasound I don't know if it is cancer or something else. I love my Sammy dearly but can't afford more testing and possible surgery. If he were younger I would get more testing done. Is there any treatment to keep him comfortable ? He is drinking water and still using the litter box but not eating anything and sleeps most of the time. He doesn't seem to be in pain and purrs when I hold him. I just can't bear to have him put to sleep and would like him to pass at home if possible. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3192 Recommendations
Any medication given would be dependent on the underlying cause, although diuretics may help with water excretion it is important to know what is causing the presence of fluid in the abdomen (ascites). I understand that you want Sammy to pass at home, but ensure that his passing will be a peaceful one; without know what is causing these symptoms we don’t know any idea of life expectancy or what to expect. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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