Bloating Average Cost

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Average Cost

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What is Bloating?

Cats are masters at hiding illness until their condition is so severe that veterinary intervention may be too late. When the cat begins to show symptoms such as pain, unexpected weakness, attempting to belch or vomit, or difficulty breathing, it should be taken to the vet immediately.

Bloating in cats is a condition that is potentially deadly. Bloating can develop if the cat has overeaten or had too much water to drink, or may develop as the result of one of several underlying medical causes. If the condition isn’t detected early, it can be fatal because the cat’s organs are being compressed, making it difficult for the animal’s body to function normally. If the bloated stomach gets large enough, the cat may have difficulty breathing. 

Symptoms of Bloating in Cats

Cats usually develop several symptoms that will tip the pet owner off to a major problem. Until the vet knows just what has caused the bloated stomach, knowing the cat’s symptoms helps the pet owner fill the vet in more accurately:

  • Repeated attempts to vomit or belch
  • Swollen abdomen and stomach
  • Drooling
  • Lethargy
  • Pale gums
  • Lowered body temperature
  • Shortness of breath
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Sudden weakness or collapse

If the cat has developed gastric dilation and volvulus (GDV), its symptoms may include:

  • Depression
  • Signs of pain
  • Shock

Causes of Bloating in Cats

Kittens and cats develop bloated stomachs because of several different reasons:

  • Intestinal parasites (roundworm, hookworm, protozoal parasites)
  • Retaining too much fluid (develops from liver or kidney failure)
  • Overeating (If this is chronic, an underlying disease may be the cause)
  • Constipation
  • Indigestion
  • Swallowing too much air while eating
  • Blocked valve at the end of the stomach
  • Gastric dilation and volvulus (stomach twists, then swells)
  • Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP)
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease

In kittens, bloating can develop from one of these causes:

  • Infection in mother cat’s mammary glands or uterus lead to toxic milk syndrome
  • Improperly mixed milk replacement formulas
  • Spoiled replacement milk or abnormal cat’s milk
  • Too many carbohydrates in kitten food (dry)
  • Congenital defects
  • Viral infections (enteric corona viral diarrhea, panleukopenia)
  • Insufficient good intestinal bacteria
  • Intestinal inflammatory illness combined with beneficial intestinal bacteria

Diagnosis of Bloating in Cats

The vet conducts a full physical exam of a cat with abdominal bloating and makes note of every symptom. To help the diagnostic process, the vet also takes X-rays, and if the cat is able to use the litter box, the vet takes stool samples and a urinalysis, which help to rule out other illnesses. The stool sample can tell the vet if the cat has intestinal worms or parasites. A complete blood count (CBC) allows the vet to determine whether the cat is suffering from a different illness.

If the vet begins to suspect that an underlying illness has set off the bloating, they will conduct even more testing on the cat to confirm or rule out these conditions, including liver or kidney disease. Even constipation can tip the vet off to other, more serious illnesses, such as an intestinal occlusion (blockage) or tumors.

Treatment of Bloating in Cats

Treatment of a bloated stomach should begin just as soon as the vet has a solid diagnosis. If the cat simply has too much air or fluid in their abdomen, the vet can decompress the stomach, helping to release the pressure from the gas within. This process also relieves pressure from too much fluid. To decompress the stomach, the vet inserts a needle into the abdomen or places a tube into the esophagus. Relief of symptoms and pain soon follows.

If the cat has gastric dilation and volvulus (GDV), the only cure for this condition is emergency surgery. The surgeon physically straightens the stomach out. During surgery, the surgeon should closely inspect the stomach to make sure no other injuries have taken place. Once the cat has suffered GDV, it is vulnerable to repeat incidences. For this reason, the vet may attach the stomach to the wall of the abdomen, reducing the risk of a future twisting event.

Bloating that develops as a result of intestinal parasites can be treated with the right deworming medication. If the cat or kitten has protozoal parasites, it will need a different medication to eradicate this infestation.

Panleukopenia and diarrhea caused by the enteric coronavirus can be treated, though the prognosis for a cat or kitten with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is not as positive.

Recovery of Bloating in Cats

When a cat’s bloated stomach is the result of overeating, intestinal worms or parasites, the cat should recover well and resume living a normal, happy life. Cats with worms or parasites may need to receive preventive treatments to avoid a new infestation that could cause future episodes of bloating.

The cat’s owner should change some daily routines and keep a close eye on the cat as well. Overeating can make the cat’s stomach larger, which allows them to pack in more food than it needs. This makes a future bloating episode more likely. Knowing this, the pet owner should provide the cat with several smaller meals throughout the day instead of giving only two or three larger meals.

Physical activity after meals should also be limited. Allowing the cat time to digest its meal reduces the chance of more bloating or even an incidence of GDV. Running around and chasing a companion dog or cat means the cat’s full stomach swings like a pendulum inside the abdomen, which increases the chances of it twisting.

If cats are allowed to roam outside, they may scavenge food from other sources, such as garbage cans. The new food may cause intestinal symptoms, gas and bloating. If the cat’s owner knows the cat has a tendency to do this, the cat should be retrained to live indoors. 

Bloating Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Mingay
Filipino
5 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

She can't carry her stomch

Why is that after i dewormed my cat after a week shes getting bloated belly.and shes hard to carry it until she die 2 weeks later from her deworming... her stomach is still bloat like water filled inside.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
It may be that the anthelmintic you are using isn’t as effective as required or that there is another condition going on in the background. If it feels like there is fluid filling the abdomen (ascites) this may be due to infection (FIP), liver disease, low blood protein among other conditions; you should consult with a local Veterinarian about Mingay’s condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sandwich
house cat
6 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Thirst
Hunger
Bloating tummy

Medication Used

Canigest

My little kitten has a bloated tummy. He is about 6 weeks old now. He was found at roughly 2 weeks old in a dump with rats bites all over his little more and paws. I took him in and started him on a bottle. I feed him the royal cannon kitten milk as his milk replacement as suggested by my vet. He does also eat Epol kitten kibble and helps himself to our other cats food when He walks by her bowl. My vet also recommended that I give him a spoon of kitten moose once daily which he gobbles up. He has had a runny tummy from day 1 and has been on several antibiotics and probiotics. He was also dewormed by my vet and she also did several stool tests. She couldn't find the cause of the runny tummy. However the last 3 days his poops are looking better but I noticed last night that his tummy is bloated. What could cause a bloated tummy so fast. He is also suddenly drinking his bottle like he hasn't been fed in days. I now only give him 2 bottles a day as per the instructions on the box and from my vet. But he has access to kibble all day and night. And water too.

Please can you give me some advise. Should I take him to vet or is this more likely a cause of him over eating and swallowing too much air when he eats?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
A bloated abdomen may be caused by air gulping especially during bottle feeding when a kitten is enthusiastic; other causes may be due to worms, fluid, low blood protein, gas among other causes. If the bloating is only from yesterday, I would keep a close eye for another day to see if it will pass; if not visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Coco
Ragdoll
2 years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

So our cat used to be very skinny and all of a sudden her stomach has got big it feels like a balloon, don’t know wheather to take her to the vet or if she has just gotten bigger

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
If her abdomen has gotten bloated all of a sudden with no apparent weight gain elsewhere on the body I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian for an examination as an enlarged abdomen may be a sign of fluid, gas or pregnancy. Fluid may be caused by liver disease, viral infections, low protein among other causes; gas may be caused by dietary issues, infections, air gulping and other causes. A visit to your Veterinarian would be advised just to check Coco over and to make sure that there isn’t anything to be concerned about. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Muffin
DOMESTIC
1 Day
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My cat muffin is about a year old.now since she was a kitten she has always had a swollen belly the vet gave her de worming to see if it would help she had no worms but her tummy is usually bloated alot more after eating. She has no signs of pain or discomfort she uses the bathroom regularly nothing in her stool. She eats sleeps plays cuddles.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
Bloating may be caused by an accumulation of either gas or fluid; in cases of gas it may be due to nutrition or bacteria whereas with fluid accumulation the cause can be more sinister. Sometimes a cat may be bloated due to consumption of air whilst eating or fermentation of food; it is very difficult to say what the cause may be. If your Veterinarian has ruled out worms and Muffin is wormed regularly that wouldn’t be the cause; it may be worth trying a different food to see if there is any improvement in bloating after eating. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Inah
DOMESTIC
3 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Bloating

My cat has a bloated stomach. And just today I noticed a bump on her side right down her ribs. I'm worried because her brother died with that kind of stomach too and swollen feet.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
Reading your description I would be concerned mainly with worms or feline infectious peritonitis (wet); giving an anthelmintic (for worms) should be done on a regular basis but I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian to determine the cause of the abdominal swelling especially if her brother died with similar symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/coronavirus

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Missy
British Longhair
14 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My cat has always been fit and healthy, she has 6 months check up where she has blood test and also all her injections.. but she looks like she is pregnant. She is still eating and drinking normally and using her litter tray. Her last bloods were July and it all came back fine

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
Bloating could be due to gas or to fluid, without examining Missy I cannot say which is the cause; gas may be caused by bacterial infection, gulping of air and digestion issues; fluid may be caused by heart failure, liver disease, hypoalbuminemia among other causes. I would return to your Veterinarian as many things can change in three months since her last check up and would be best to repeat blood tests and physical examination to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lilo
Ragdoll
11 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Always hungry
not playing
Bloated hard belly

Hello my ragdoll male is very bloated around the belly but eats and drinks but is always now hungry. He doesn't show interest in playing anymore but doesn't seem to be in any pain

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
There are a few possible causes for bloat and it it needs to be determined whether the bloating is caused by fluid or gas; normally cats Lilo’s age have gas bloating which may be caused by parasites, infections, foreign objects, poisoning, food sensitivity, gulping air among other causes. Give Lilo an anthelmintic (wormer) to see if this helps; if there is still no joy try giving a restricted diet or visit your Veterinarian for a checkup. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Leon
Domestic longhair
18 Weeks
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Swollen Abdomen

My 18 week old kitten has a hard stomach. He seems in no pain whatsoever, allows me to gently press it and rub it. It doesn't look swollen when looking at it but it feels round and hard. He has been treated for possible worms (as a precaution), is on dry food for kittens with plenty of water available. He is otherwise a happy and playful kitten. Just feeling slightly concerned.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
Worms are a possibility, make sure you are using an effective anthelmintic as some over the counter products are not so effective. A hard abdomen may be due to some stomach upset; if Leon is still eating, drinking and defecating I would keep an eye on him for a day or two. Most likely a check in with your Veterinarian would be required to give a once over as foreign bodies, infections and other causes may also be to blame. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ruby
Maine Coon
8-9 years
Serious condition
2 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

very bloated, wobbled due to fluid in abdominal ca

Ruby has been suffering bloating for over a year. We took her to the vet, who treated her for worms, but also diagnosed her with malfunctioning kidneys, which he said cats sometimes suffer, and there is no effective treatment. She is otherwise quite active. Appetite is good, and she is very active. I know she is uncomfortable, and due to he girth has trouble with grooming. The vet seemed very pessimistic about her prognosis, and rather than see her suffer recommends euthanizing her, when her suffering is too great. She is a great cat. Still wants to be queen of her territory, loves affection, and eats regularly. Only about 8 years old, I don't want to accept that his "diagnosis" is necessarily the fact.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

In cases like Rubys, it is difficult to comment as I haven’t examined her. I would suggest getting a second opinion regarding Ruby’s condition, especially if you’re having doubts and your Veterinarian is recommending euthanasia. Bloating and kidney disease can go hand in hand. In these cases, if a cat isn’t exhibiting pain and is carrying out normal functions, I would be reluctant to recommend euthanasia. But, as I mentioned, I didn’t examine Ruby so I cannot fully comment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Need help diagnose this xray of similar case http://prac.to/ml?t=OiaqovWC

Need help diagnosing similar case http://prac.to/ml?t=OiaqovWC xray

Hello Barbarella4455, I read your post and wanted to suggest this website (https://www.petwellbeing.com) which has holistic products that have help two of my cats in the past. One of them had a growth in the stomach and vet told me he only had a few weeks left back in January I started giving him Life Gold from Pet Welbeing and he has improved tremendously and he's still here 5 months later. I hope this helps.

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Rufus
Persian
9 Years
Critical
Has Symptoms
Abdominal Distension
It was suggested I put my cat to sleep. He was 9 y/o and had bloat when he was 4y/0. Two weeks prior to his death he became bloated and took him to the Vet Hospital where the relived the air in his stomach. The next morning he was bloated again and other exray were taken. He was impacted. They cleared him out and put him on Miralax, Cisipride to increase his motility, and Ratidine. His did have two bowel movements and then continued to bloat. With vomiting. So they then added Prednisone and Remeron to help with his appetite. The day and night before his death he was kneading aggressively , hunching and wagging his tail. That next morning he was straining so hard his penis extruded. I took him immediately in to the Vet. They suspected a tumor or a neuron problem. Suggested I could get an Ultrasound and if it was a tumor he would need surgery and chemo and the outcome would be the same. Rather than see him suffer any more I allowed Euthanasia. I feel like I failed him and wondered if he was misdiagnosed. I think the food he was eating Royal Canin SO caused the impaction. When attempting to hydrate it to offer him soft food it took 20 minutes to break down. I am so filled with guilt about allowing him to be put to sleep. I am sick with grief. Please share your thoughts. Jenny Bagen In Memory of my Precious Rufus. Read more at: https://www.vetary.com/cat/condition/bloating