Congestive Heart Failure Average Cost

From 474 quotes ranging from $200 - 3,000

Average Cost

$1,800

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What is Congestive Heart Failure?

Congestive heart failure in cats is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical treatment. Early detection may significantly increase the chance of survival. If a cat is displaying possible symptoms, a prompt veterinary consultation is warranted.

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a condition that occurs when insufficient blood is circulated throughout the body, causing fluid to back up into the lungs. Failure can occur in either the right or left side of the heart, or in both sides. It is commonly caused by a thickening of the heart walls, also known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

Symptoms of Congestive Heart Failure in Cats

Symptoms may develop slowly, making them easy to miss unless owners are vigilant. Affected cats may display one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Rapid breathing
  • Weakness/lethargy
  • Increased heart rate
  • Decreased appetite
  • Hind limb paralysis
  • Unusual lung sounds
  • Pale or blue-tinted mucous membranes
  • Heart murmur
  • Enlarged liver
  • Abdominal distension 
  • Collapse
  • Sudden death

Causes of Congestive Heart Failure in Cats

Congestive heart failure can affect cats of any age, breed, or gender. It occurs more often in cats that are middle-aged or older. There is also evidence that the Maine Coon breed may have a genetic predisposition. Common causes of CHF include:

  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 
  • Thyroid disorder
  • High blood pressure
  • Pericardial effusion (fluid surrounding the heart)
  • Anemia
  • Abnormal heart rhythm
  • Heart defects
  • Narrowing of aortic artery
  • Heartworm disease
  • Tumors
  • Pregnancy
  • Birth defects 

Diagnosis of Congestive Heart Failure in Cats

The treating veterinarian will review the cat's full medical history. Owners should be prepared to discuss details regarding the onset and severity of symptoms and share any theories regarding any other possible causes. Since the condition is sometimes hereditary, any information that can be provided regarding the cat’s family line will also be helpful. 

A physical exam will be performed and standard lab tests will be ordered. These include a complete blood count (CBC), thyroid test, electrolyte panel, biochemical panel, urinalysis and heartworm test. Cats may also be tested for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia (FeLV). Using a stethoscope, the vet will be able to note sounds of congestion which would indicate the presence of fluid in the lungs. Blood pressure will be measured and visual diagnosis may be made using chest X-rays, electrocardiogram (ECG) and/or echocardiogram.

Treatment of Congestive Heart Failure in Cats

Congestive heart failure caused by hyperthyroidism may be reversed once the thyroid condition has been successfully treated. In other cases, the treatment plan will be based on the severity of symptoms and the underlying cause of the condition:

Hospitalization

If symptoms are severe, particularly if the cat is having difficulty breathing or has extremely low blood pressure, hospitalization may be required. Oxygen therapy may be administered when there is fluid surrounding the heart or lungs, and the fluid may need to be drained. This will help to ease pressure on the heart, makes breathing easier. When fluid build-up has been removed, the heart is able to pump blood more efficiently. If fluid is present in the chest or abdomen, it may be removed using a technique called tapping.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery may be recommended to treat cases of congestive heart failure that are caused by a birth defect or a congenital or acquired heart valve disease. This treatment option is often expensive and requires a surgical specialist. 

Symptom Management

In most cases, congestive heart failure it is not curable. Prescription medications can be used to control symptoms and improve the overall quality of life. Diuretics help to reduce fluid build-up, and vasodilators or ACE inhibitors ease the flow of blood through the body by dilating the blood vessels. Positive inotropes cause the heart to beat more forcefully, which increases the amount of blood that is pumped through the body. Prescription medications will likely need to be used for the remainder of the cat’s life.

Recovery of Congestive Heart Failure in Cats

Cats that have been diagnosed with congestive heart failure will need frequent follow-up visits. During the appointments, it is likely that blood tests, radiographs, and echocardiograms will be performed in order to monitor the cat's heart health. It is important to attend all follow-up appointments as medication may need to be adjusted periodically.

A low-sodium diet that is balanced and highly nutritious will likely be recommended. There are many commercially-available cat foods that meet this requirement. Diet is very important to successful recovery, and no changes should be made without first checking with the veterinarian. 

In some cases, the vet will recommend a moderate exercise plan intended to strengthen the heart while keeping blood pressure at a controlled rate. If the vet has not specifically recommended exercise then the cat should be kept calm and activity should be limited. When cats are unwilling to comply, owners may need to take preventative measures. Periodic cage rest may be necessary and it may be helpful to set up barriers to limit space available for running and jumping.

Congestive Heart Failure Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Fiona
Domestic shorthair
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Wheezing
elevated cardiopet probpn

My cat is a little over 12 years old now. 11 years ago, when I brought her in for her one year check up they spotted a murmur and I had and EKG done. She had mild enlargement of her heart. It was mentioned that we would keep an eye on it, but not to worry. For the past years the murmur has not gotten worse and she has been in excellent health-- she has been to the doctor every year for a checkup.

This past visit for her 12 year check up they saw found her cardiopet probpn at 1480 and recomended an EKG. Two vets at the clinic said that it did not have to be done right away, and an appointment for EKG was made for mid-December (about a month from now). In the past week since her appointment her purring has become more wheezy. She also has been disinterested in eating for the past few months unless she has a lot of encouragement (tail scratches while she's eating). Her restroom habits are the same and no abnormal vomiting.

The wheezing purrs coupled with the extremely high BPN numbers are my concern. Do I need to find a different vet to do an EKG faster? Or, is there something I can do in the meantime to help prevent anything catastrophic (no pun intended), such as aspirin therapy?

I would definitely see another vet if possible. My 15 year old cat was diagnosed with HCM in July and had / has many of the same symptoms. His condition was due to hyperthyroidism. When I took him to the vet (a cat specialist) they immediately sent me to an emergency clinic. He was in cardiac arrest, his gums were blue, and he needed to be put into an oxygen cage. Don't wait.

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Bernie
tabby
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Advanced heart failure
Fluid on lungs
Difficulty Breathing

Is there anything that can be done for Bernie. He’s on medication right now but even with medication his life expectancy is 6 months - 1 year. Is there anything I can do to save him, any surgery no matter what cost.
please respond quickly

Hi there, one option to discuss with your vet is a prescription called Pimobendan/Vetmedin. Studies have shown it increases life span in cats with CHF by a year or more, but I'm sure it depends on the pet. I'm so sorry for you and Bernie.

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Shday
British short hair
15 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy
Coughing
Peeing outside litter box

Medication Used

Enalapril
potassium
Furosemide
Pimobendan

My cat is almost 14 yrs 10 months old and two days ago we had to take him to the ER. The ER doctor suspected that he has CHF, and treated him accordingly. He responded to treatment well, and now is almost back to normal. However, we still have to take him to a cardiologist for follow up. My question are: if he is diagnosed with CHF, (1) How frequently does he have to have tests done? (2) What're the approximate costs per year for treating his condition?

My cat has had CHF since at least age 2 when I adopted him. We take him to the cardiologist every ~6 months. Each appointment is about $500 and his medicines now run about $100 a month. It's not an affordable disease. :(

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Patsy
short hair
11 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Jerky breathing
Occasional coughing fits
Wheezing

My cat is 11 years old, and was diagnosed with myocardial hypertrophy four and a half years ago. The cardiologist said he would rate the progression as moderate based on the ekg and xray. I decided against further treatment at the time, owing to my lack of funds, and we’ve had a good 4, asymptomatic years together.

About 2 to 3 weeks ago I thought I noticed that her breathing pattern had started to change (sudden, jerky breaths) and I thought perhaps she was a little more lethargic. Over the last two or three days I can definitely hear a rattle-y wheeze when she breathes and her lethargy has increased. She is still eating, drinking, grooming, and asks to go outside. It seems clear to me she has some pulmonary edema and is at some early to middle stage of CHF, possibly rapidly progressing. I’m not interested in putting her through rounds of X-rays and EKGs and blood work and IVs for the rest of her life. But I would also like to be humane and do the best I can to make the rest of her life as long and pain free as possible without the luxury of those tests and treatments. Or at the least, have an informed sense of when she’s in too much pain or discomfort to let her continue on like this. Can anyone help me?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
If you’re noticing a sudden change in Patsy’s condition and health is declining you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as it is very difficult to give specific advice about cases like this without personally examining a patient first. Also, there may be some medical management options like diuretics which may make her more comfortable but you would need to discuss this with a Veterinarian in person. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Nice.

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Simon
dsh
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Asymptomatic

Medication Used

Enalapril

I have been planning to move from NYC to California with my two cats. To my surprise, Simon was diagnosed with myocardial disease 6 months ago--he had no symptoms. He started taking enalapril, pimobendan, and Plavix. (He does not have CHF.)

He had his second EKG last week, and the vet said one of the chambers of his heart had actually gotten smaller. The report mentions systolic and diastolic dysfunction, mild concentric left ventricular hypertropy, mild atrial dilation, and dynamic right ventricular outflow tract gradient (benign). He has no cardiac related symptoms.


My question is about travel with him. I do not want to put him in danger by putting him on a plane. We live in a quiet apartment, and the cats spend only about 15 minutes in their carriers on the way to and from the vet. No other travel. Could being confined, the noise of the airport, the long flight, etc., stress him out so much that he goes into CHF? Would it help to start taking them on long car trips so they get used to being confined to their carriers and being in motion?

I have been wanting to move for years, but I simply could not go if it would be a significant threat to Simon.

I know this sounds crazy, but if I could hire my vet to come on the flight with us--with whatever medications would be appropriate--would that be helpful? (I've known my vet for a very long time, he has family in California, and this is really not as crazy as it sounds.)

I know there are no guarantees, but I would appreciate any insights you might have. This is a tough decision.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
You should discuss Simon’s condition and your plans with your Veterinarian, since I haven’t personally examined Simon I cannot clear him as being fit to travel by air; care must be taken to determine the travel conditions of the airline you plan on travelling with as some airlines allow pets (cats and small dogs) in the cabin while others put them in the cargo hold. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Talk to your vet about giving simon medication to help him sleep the entire way -although I'm not sure it would last for a 6 hour flight plus airport time. American Airlines lets you fly with your cat on board for a fee. When you do this you reserve one of the only 3 allowable pet spots the plane. It seems when we flew other airlines couldn't guarantee a spot. It is very stressful for the cat to fly. We've done it twice and the second time with knocking them out which was much better (but they were healthy too.) Good luck.

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Eevee
Norwegian Forest
6 Months
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Coughing sometimes
Problems in breathing
Weakness
Rapid breathing

Medication Used

Salbitamol

My cat is having difficulties in breathing and have been fast breathing lately I took her to the vet many times and the doctor told me to give her salbitamol twice a which is a cure for bronchitis or asthma
I think he misdiagnosed her because she's only getting worse
I really need help and I don't know what to do.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm not sure how long your cat has been having this problem, but if inhaled steroids aren't helping with her condition, you may wish to seek a second opinion, or ask your veterinarian what other testing might be needed to determine the cause for her breathing problems. She is a very young cat, and possible reasons for her problems might be a bacterial or fungal infection, an anatomic abnormality, or a heart condition. If x-rays have not been taken, that would be a good next step. I hope that she recovers well.

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Spencer
Tuxedo
11 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Paralysis
Paralysis belly distension

Hello...we fesperately love our cat spencer but we are also very poor so far this week my kind vet has only charged 400 ...but im afraid after two doctors 4 prescriptions and an xray we havent done all we could medication wise...the first doctor was way off thinking he had respiratory infection...he didnt improve ...after two more days his back legs went out...new (head ) vet diagnosed thrombosis from a clot and possible heart failure...but after xray he said his heart looked good and he found a fused disc in his lower spine...he gave me steroids in hopes that it was not thrombosis nut a slipped disc...first day he improved...could walk but with a severe swaying limp...but today hes obviously declining again...so i think its heart failure/clot after all...my big worry is that his belly is very distended...and he has diarreah...ihe vet did not run blood tests ... Am worried the vet should have given him diaretics to ease the pressure and given blood tests...i have follow up tuesday should i bring him in sooner...what other meds can be given for heart/thrombosis to make him more comfortable and aviod premature death? Thank you - jennifer

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
These cases are difficult because without certain tests (blood tests and possibly echocardiogram) it is difficult to make a specific diagnosis; treatment would depend on the underlying cause and if the abdomen is filling with fluid it may be an indicator of heart failure and diuretics may be indicated, but if it is heart failure other medication would also need to be prescribed to manage the condition. Without examining Spencer I cannot say what the specific cause is, but if you’re having financial difficulty you should try to reach out to a charity for assistance. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.dogingtonpost.com/need-help-with-vet-bills-or-pet-food-there-are-resources-available/

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Rufus
short hair
4 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

slooshing in chest
High grade Heart murmur
Wide open eyes
heavy breathing with open mouth
Blue gums and tongue
Lethargy

My 4 month old kitten went into cardiac distress. I took him to emergency vereinary care, he said that the kitten likely wouldn’t have made it through the night so he didn’t feel like testing would be of any help. He suggested euthanization. I even said I was willing to surrender to surrender the kitten just so he could get the care that he needs...did I do the wrong thing by euthanizing him? Do you think he said all of this because he knew I was short on money? He wanted a $220 deposit before starting.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I don't think that the emergency veterinarian suggested euthanasia for Rufus because of funds - we don't recommend that option unless we think that the chance of recovery is very poor. From your description, Rufus was probably going into heart failure and would not have survived, and this option was kinder. I am sorry for your loss.

Do you think it might have helped if I sought treatment sooner? The vet said that if they are born with it, it’s hard to gage a survival rate...I just want to know for peace of mind that I did the right thing and that there were no other options I could have taken sooner

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Safari
dsh
9 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Fast Breathing

Hi, I have a cat who is breathing really fast or is having a fast heartbeat, I can't tell which one. She doesnt want to eat or drink. She does walk but only to her box to rest. She only wants to rest. I'm not sure if it's an enlarged heart or congestive heart failure or something else. Please help to determine if there is any treatment or a full recovery. I don't want to waste money on the inevitable. Her symptoms are not using the litter box, lack of play or interest of doing anything other than laying down, not eating or drinking, can hear her breathing, and the heavy or fast heartbeat or breathing.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Without examining Safari, I have no way to determine what is the cause of her breathing or increased heart rate. She needs to be seen by a veterinarian - they will be able to give you an idea as to what might be going on, as well as any testing or treatment options, and you will be able to make educated decisions. At the very least, if it is her time, she will be able to go peacefully, rather than seeming as uncomfortable as she is now. I hope that everything goes well for her.

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Sophia
American Shorthair
14 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

respiratory distress

My calico kitty is in ER & Oxygen ICU, had 240mL fluid drained and it is milky, not clear. She has NO other symptoms other than she was not breathing right (sides sucking way in and then a very THUMP like blowing out of her abdominal cavity) so I took her in. She does take meds for high blood pressure (Amlodepine) but otherwise she is active, eats well, and basically happy. She is borderline HyperT but not enough to medicate. Kidney values are "good". She is 14 yo. Why would fluid be milky and will fluid keep filling up in her chest? I do not want her to repeat this traumatizing event.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Sophia has some complicated health problems, and without knowing more about her, I have a hard time commenting on the fluid that was removed from her chest. Since she was seen by the ER vetererinians, it would be best to ask them what might be going on, and how to prevent it from happening, if that is possible. Depending on the cause, you may not be able to prevent it, but may be able to control it.

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Peach
Domestic long hair
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Hard breathing

Medication Used

Salix

My male cat Peach was diagnosed with congestive heart failure yesterday. After spending $350 at vet for x-ray and for the fluid to be taken out seemed to be doing much better. When I got home I mistakenly crushed his salix in his food which made him puke it up and then a horrendous sound came out of his mouth everytime he breathed. Then he made this noise twice in a row that I had never heard from him before which freaked me right out which made me go straight to emergency, another $250 spent there for him to get oxygen a injection of salix and an injection of anti vomit medication because he had also vomited at the emergency. They also put the ultra sound on him for less than 2 seconds which they said they saw that his atrium was enlarged so they were pretty sure it WAS chf but should follow up with a cardiologist. I have been out of work for a month after torn mcl and am out of funds, I was out of funds before these expensive vet visits. Can a cardiologist actually be able to give my kitty a longer life with these diagnostics? We're really not even sure of age because he showed up at our doorstep one day and claimed our house to be his as well. He could be older than what we think. He has been doing SO much better than when we brought him home from emergency. First night he wouldn't leave the water dish. Since he's been coming around for pets and fresh air saw him eat SOME dry food not as much as usual. Another question can salix make them less hungry? Thanks for listening and I hope you can answer both of my questions.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I'm sorry that Peach is having this problem. If you are unable to afford an appointment with a cardiologist, there are some common medications that he can be on to improve his heart function and give him a chance - whether he responds to them will just take time to find out. Salix won't make them less hungry, no, but CHF will, as they don't feel good when they are having problems breathing. If he seems to be more social, and is eating, those are positive signs, and you can talk with your veterinarian about medications if you are not able to see the cardiologist. I hope that he does well.

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Kulio
Cheetoh
8 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

CHF, Not Eating

My cat was having trouble breathing and wasn’t moving much. I took him into the Vet and he was diagnosed with CHF and they removed 200 ml of pink fluid from his chest by tapping and gave him oxygen. He was sent home later that day, with several meds, including a diuretic and heart meds.

The thing is he ate a little when he got home but since then he does not touch his food. He drinks water and urinates but no food and no poop. It’s been two days now and I’m worried about the no food.

I just brought him to a new vet and they said either to take him to a 24-Hour facility and put him on IV fluids or to give him an appetite stimulant. We opted for the second one and are waiting to start with that.

I read an article that sometimes it takes cats 2-5 days to eat post CHF and draining procedures. Is this accurate?

Also it’s so hard to give him meds using this whole syringe thing. He struggles and strain so like crazy and also he hates hospitals. So am trying not to put him in if I don’t have to because he really doesn’t do well with all that.

Please let me know any guidance or thoughts. Thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Each cat is different, however some loss of appetite may occur and some cats do not regain their appetite at all and require force feeding; in these cases supportive care and management of the heart failure is needed to improve heart function and to remove fluid. There is nothing I can recommend without examining Kulio first. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Spot
American Shorthair
13 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Sudden Death

My cat had asthma and hyoerthyroidism controlled with meds. He had a fast heartbeat and a murmur. Found him on step near our house dead after being outside for five hours in 40 degree weather. He usually came back if he was comd. Could he have been in pain and hiding before he tried coming home and collapsed? Congestive heart failure maybe. Two weeks prior he was coughing abd we took him to emergency vet who prescribed antobiotics which worked. He was fine when I let him out! Could the cold have contributed to heart failure and was ut a slow ir fast death? Heartbroken that I didnt look for him earlier but he always came back.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm sorry for the loss of your Spot. The cold may have exacerbated his asthma, or respiratory conditions. We may never know what happened, or if he suffered, but he did come home to you, and it seems that he died suddnenly, with no pain. I am sorry for your loss, again.

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B
American Short Hair
4 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Not Eating
Breathing faint
Lethargy
Not Moving

My cat had diarrhea this past Monday and has barely ate food. We took him to the vet and they sent him home with “weight management” food by scientific diet and some probiotic to feed him for the next two days. Since last night he has been very lethargic, not eating drinking a lot of water. Today he was limp like a rag doll so I took him to the er and we found out he has hcm/ congestive heart failure. What are his success rate?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It is very difficult to determine prognosis since the severity of the condition, the severity of the symptoms, response to treatment among other factors will ultimately determine the prognosis. You should follow up from the emergency visit with a visit to your regular Veterinarian who will be able to give you an idea of what to expect. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bosco
American Shorthair
16 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Restless
CHF
Difficulty purring
Liposarcoma,
Weakness
difficulty drinking
Fluid In Abdomen
Difficulty Passing Stool
Noisy Breathing

Medication Used

Lasix

My 16 yo cat has CHF following surgery for abdominal liposarcoma. The cancer came right back. She also has a mass in one lung, and has had surgery for breast cancer in the past. The lung mass has rapidly grown after a relatively long period of observation. The liposarcoma made it’s appearance quickly and she started having edema shortly thereafter.

She is now on lasix twice a day. She can’t hardly take a few sips of water without getting strangled. She eats in very small amounts. Seems as if she may have lost some of her sense of smell. She goes to her litter box or to her water bowl and back to her cubby hole to hide. I’ve simplified it for her. Until the last two days she has not wanted anything to do with me. Ive raised her from a bottle. I attributed this to her hating the fact that I have been giving her her meds. Now she’s wanting to be held and rubbed, she’s accustomed to alot of attention from me, but if she starts to purr she can’t stop due to the fluid in her airway. So now, she leans in for a rub and by the second stroke when she starts to purr she pulls away, turns her back.

We’re planning to euthanize today. And it’s killing me. And I can’t comfort her in the one way I know that we both need. Is there anything else I can do to make her more comfortable in these last hours? Positions that could make her more comfortable? Should I try elevating one end of her bed and see if she will try it, since she has such difficulty getting comfortable? Is there anything? Am I making the right choice? I know both cancers are aggressive and have chosen to not pursue chemo due to the distance of travel, and the fact she is a high anxiety cat, and the research on these two types of cancers. Not to mention the lung. Now with the fluid she has no quality of life.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Based on your description, it sounds like you’re making the right decision; it is never easy saying goodbye to a loved one and it is made more difficult with the short snuggle time you have left. There is no specific position, it is just a case of letting Bosco find her own comfortable place; she has a lot going on and trying to position her or try one way over another would only add unnecessary stress for the both of you and I’m sure you don’t want your last 24 hours to be just a fight to position her for mild improvement in breathing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Casper
Half Persian
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Bite mark

My cat died yesterday suddenly she was perfectly healthy and was pregnant was about to deliver her babies in few days. She went outside and we found her dead. She had bite mark on her body but It didn’t seem to be the cause of death. I want to know the cause of her death. Her eyes were partly open her mouth was open n her tongue was hanging out of her mouth. She was 3 year n 3 months old. She became pregnant for the 4th time n there was very little gap between her 3rd and 4th pregnancy. When we found her dead she was sitting in her normal position infront of the door. Her babies died too with her.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Whilst I understand that this is a distressing time for you but I cannot determine a cause of death without performing a necropsy, if you’re looking for answers for the cause of Casper’s death you should ask your Veterinarian for a necropsy. Possible causes may include pregnancy complications, infections, trauma, congenital disorders, poisoning among many other possible causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lovey
Scottish Fold
7 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy, heavy breathing, fluid

Medication Used

Lasix

My cat yesterday was diagnosed with CHF They had her on oxygen therapy and lasix. They told me she is doing better but want a cardio to give her an echo. She has (had a benign heart murmur) they are saying meds, etc but I would like a real life guess as her life expectacy. Also quality of life. She is my sweetheart but what am I doing if I put her through all this for 3-6 months. Am I being selfish? Please help. Thx

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Without me examining Lovey and having the echocardiography done I cannot be sure whether this may be successfully managed over a long period of time or if it is a case of prolonging the inevitable. You should visit a Cardiologist to get all the information that you can and to have the echocardiography done as well so that you are able to make an informed decision. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Mookie
ESH
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

lethargic, not eating much,

How long will my cat live with CHF? I am having a very hard time getting him to take the meds. I have tried pill form, which has been a battle. I recently got liquid form from the compounding Pharm. At first he would eat it in his food. But, after about 2-3 days, he just walks away from it. He's definitely not getting a full dose of meds everyday.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
How Mookie will do with his heart condition completely depends on what stage he is in and how severe his heart failure is. I'm not sure what medications he is on, but some of the medications are probably better than none. it would be best to call your veterinarian to see what to expect if he does not take his medications, as you do not want Mookie to suffer.

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Kuzya
tabby
8 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Minimal Energy
Weight Loss
Shallow Rapid Breathing
Loss of Appetite

Just yesterday, I had to euthanize my cat because he had CHF. It was a genetic cause for his disease sadly, and the veterinarian had said that at the stage of CHF, surgery couldn't fix it or help him. Only either euthanization or spending thousands of dollars on medications that would only partially lessen his symptoms, and lengthen his life for six months.
After researching this disease, and finding out that surgery was an option, I was wondering if surgery could have actually cured his CHF.
Also, with genetic CHF, are there certain things that could have triggered the disease in him? Perhaps sudden lack of excersize? Or something that could have really stressed him out?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I am very sorry about Kuyza, that is very difficult. There really aren't any surgical options for CHF. If he had a genetic condition that affected hi as a kitten, there may have been a surgery available at that time, before the damage to his heart was done, but once he was in heart failure, the only options for him would have been medications, multiple times a day, and that would have only prolonged his life for a while. You most likely made the best decision for him, as hard as it was.

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