Hypersalivation Average Cost

From 270 quotes ranging from $200 - 1,000

Average Cost

$350

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What is Hypersalivation?

Cats in general are not prone to drooling. Because it is uncommon, getting a veterinary assessment is the best course of action, to determine whether the hypersalivation is harmless or serious. The earlier that a health issue is detected, the more likely it can be successfully treated. Secondary bacterial infections can develop if mouth injuries are left too long. Saliva can also irritate the mouth and, in response, the immune system will cause the body to section the excess saliva off in a cavity. If the drool has a foamy appearance, the situation may prove to be fatal.

A cat may salivate or drool for many different reasons. While drooling is a normal body function, excessive drooling, or hypersalivation, can be cause for concern. Normal drooling is usually accompanied by excitement or pleasure in the cat. Abnormal drooling appears suddenly, and can last for hours. A cat who has overheated may begin to hypersalivate. Certain diseases, injuries, and viruses can also cause a cat to drool excessively.

Symptoms of Hypersalivation in Cats

While most signs of drooling are associated with the mouth, many underlying issues will create multiple symptoms throughout the body. All of these secondary symptoms should be noted, as they can make identifying the health problem easier. Symptoms are as follows:

  • Excessive drooling (sometimes lasting for hours)
  • Blood in the saliva
  • Bad breath
  • Inability to eat or drink
  • Swelling or masses in the mouth
  • Vomiting
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Labored breathing

Causes of Hypersalivation in Cats

The cause of the excessive drooling may be local to the mouth, or may be a symptom of an internal problem. Sudden onset is often linked with more serious issues. While cats may drool for numerous reasons, the following are the most common.

  • Excitement
  • Nervousness
  • Being near appetizing food
  • Poisoning (from a variety of sources)
  • Medication side effects
  • Foreign body stuck in mouth tissue
  • Teething (in kittens)
  • Injury to the tongue or mouth
  • Insect stings
  • Gingivitis and other gum disease
  • Abscessed tooth
  • Stomatitis (inflammation of the mouth and lips)
  • Acid reflux
  • Rabies
  • Pseudorabies
  • Cancer of the mouth
  • Nausea
  • Upper respiratory infection
  • Liver shunt
  • Chronic kidney failure
  • Heat stroke
  • Viruses (such as feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus or feline herpesvirus)

Diagnosis of Hypersalivation in Cats

When bringing your cat to a veterinarian, be sure to provide the cat’s full medical history to help sort out potential underlying causes of excessive drooling. The veterinarian will perform a complete physical and oral examination. The cat may need to be sedated for the oral examination to be successful. All symptoms will be noted to see how they match with possible health problems. The vet will look for obvious injuries, abscesses, foreign objects, or masses within the mouth.

Full blood work will be run, including a complete blood count to help detect anemia or the presence of cancer, and a biochemical profile to find signs of metabolic disease. Urinalysis can help to assess how well the kidneys are functioning. A bile acid blood test will indicate the function of the liver. Cultures of the urine may identify bacterial infections present in the body. X-rays or ultrasounds may be used to assess organ health or to locate tumors or lesions in the mouth or body. A biopsy may need to be collected from any masses found.

Treatment of Hypersalivation in Cats

The best course of treatment will be based on the underlying issue that has been identified. Treatment is only necessary if a health problem is present.

Poisoning 

If your cat has been poisoned, the stomach may need to be emptied either by a pump or by inducing vomiting. Certain medications may be administered to counteract the effects of the poison and activated charcoal may be given to stop toxin absorption in the body.

Dental Issues 

Dental surgery may be necessary if abscesses have been found. Singular or multiple tooth extraction may also be needed. Any wounds should be cleaned, and antibiotics may be prescribed to eliminate infection.

Cancer 

If malignant tumors have been found, surgical removal may be attempted. This is only possible in certain locations of tumor growth. Both radiation therapy and chemotherapy may be used to fight cancer on a microscopic level.

Upper Respiratory Infection 

Many URIs are the result of viral infections, which have no curative treatment. Supportive care can greatly assist in recovery. This includes intravenous fluid administration, humidifier use, appetite stimulants, and feeding tubes.

Kidney or Liver Issues 

These complications may require surgery and/or ongoing care and medication application for the remainder of the cat’s life. Special diets may need to be followed to help alleviate these organ problems.

Foreign Body Presence 

To remove a foreign body causing salivation, the cat may need to be sedated. Certain cases may require surgery.

Recovery of Hypersalivation in Cats

If surgery has been part of your cat’s treatment, you will need to follow all at-home care guidelines provided by the veterinarian. This will include monitoring your cat for signs of infection near the incision site. Painkillers, medication or antibiotics may need to be administered daily. Your veterinarian will have you return for follow-up appointments to see how the surgery site is healing and to assess the overall health of the cat. 

The prognosis greatly depends on the type of health issue that has been diagnosed. Dental issues generally resolve with surgical repair, cleaning, and a good oral health routine. Recovery from being poisoned greatly depends on how fast the the poisoning was identified and what substance has been consumed. Kidney and liver disease prognoses are guarded, and often require lifelong treatment. Usually, a cat will recover from an upper respiratory infection. If the underlying cause of the infection is a virus, it may stay in the cat’s system permanently. Cancer prognosis depends on how soon it is treated and how aggressive the cancer is. If your cat is diagnosed with rabies, it will have to be euthanized. Vaccines to prevent rabies should be a part of your annual vet visit. 

Hypersalivation Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Kitty
domestic short hair
8 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling

Cat just started drooling excessively and pawing at her mouth. I gave her a treat to see if she would eat it and she did with some difficulty. She has lost teeth before. I am thinking she might be losing another one.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. The signs that you are describing can be a sign of mouth pain, and can be caused by dental disease, growths or tumors, or other infections or disease. It would be best to have Kitty examined by a veterinarian, as they can look at her mouth, assess what might be going on, and recommend any treatment so that she is comfortable and pain free.

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Köpük
Persian
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling

Hi, my cat stayed at one of my friends for 16 days and that friend also had a cat. The thing is my cat didn’t like the other cat and my friend also told me that she was not able to pet and play with my cat enough because her cat was getting angry towards mine when she did it. So, my cat was unhappy when I brought him home first, I am trying to have much more quality time with him but he doesn’t eat much and sometimes his saliva is excessive, but there is no bad breath and his poop is fine. My friend also changed his food brand when he was staying at her house. Do you think hypersaliva and appetite issue comes from there? Thank you :)

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining him, I can't comment on what might be going on with him, but it does not sound like it would be related to a stay at your friend's house. It would be best to have him seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine him, assess what might be going on, and recommend any treatment that he may need. I hope that he is okay.

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Cookie
Persian
18 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Not Eating
hypersalivation
isolation
Lethargy

My persian female cat, sudenly became very calm. She has not eat since morning. I noticed that her mouth is wet. I did use a special hair spray for brushing her today but it was not on the parts that she might leaked. She also had diarrhea this morning, which I thought it caused by too much treating of yesterday.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. If Cookie is quiet, not eating, and salivating, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and make sure that she is okay. Without examining her, I can't say what might be going on with her, but it may or may not be related to the hair spray, and she may need supportive care to feel better. I hope that she is okay.

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Maggie
Persian
8 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling
Excessive Saliva
bad breath

My cat is 8 months old. She drools with some quantity of blood.She also sleeps a lot and when she drools it drips from her mouth and her mouth gets dirty and after sometime the drool becomes dry leaving dark spot on her white hair. Why does she drools so much and her drools smell bad?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining Maggie, I can't determine what might be going on with her mouth, but if she is drooling that much and you are seeing blood in it, she should be examined by a veterinarian to look at her mouth and see what might be going on. They'll be able to assess her mouth, determine what is happening, and get her treatment for any problems. I hope that everything goes well for her.

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Chicklet
stray
5 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Salivating blood
Salivating

My cat has been salivating and sometimes with blood. He has difficulty in eating and drinking. He is very agressive so i could not bring him to the vet. What can i do as he is really not comfortable and i am bothered with his condition.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Chicklet does need to be seen by a veterinarian - they can sedate him if needed to examine him and see what is going on with his mouth and teeth, whether he has dental disease or another oral problem. They'll be able to recommend any testing or treatments that he needs. I hope that he is okay.

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Precious
Calico
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Sore mouth

What cat has the symptoms and his throat is really red and sore and his tongue sticks out all Tommy's and have some saliva and it and it smells really bad have been taken her to the vets and all I got to do is give her a shot every month while she's immune to that and is there anything in the pill form that I can get.. or any suggestions that I can do you know $61 a month is is is a lot of money but still again it's not doing any good anymore..

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
Treatment all depends on what the underlying cause is; a sore mouth or throat may be due to infection, autoimmune disease, chemical irritation, trauma (consumption of non-food items) among other causes. Without examining Precious I cannot say what the specific underlying cause is and therefore cannot recommend any different treatment; if you think you are not going down the correct path with your current Veterinarian, visit another one in your area for another opinion. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bobo
Himalayan
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling
Light meow
Slow pupil dialation

I just adopted a cat from a lady that got him from a shelter 6 months ago. I’ve had him a week, had a bunch of blood work done to make sure he’s healthy and found out today he tested positive for Heartworm. Today we had a scare where he started foaming at the mouth and excessively drooling. It was right after I gave him a new food so I thought it might be an allergic reaction. Could the two be related? What can I do for him. I love him so much already and want him to be okay.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
Many times foaming at the mouth may be caused by viscous saliva and rapid breathing; however if there are other symptoms like delayed pupil dilation and drooling it may be caused by a reaction to new food, poisoning or another cause. Keep a close eye on Bobo but I would recommend you visit your Veterinarian to be on the safe side as I cannot give you any assurance that he will be alright without examining him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Meep
tabby
12 Weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Runny eyes
hypersalivation
Sneezing

Hi I currently have 2 10 week old foster kittens that I brought home yesterday from the refuge. One is fine, the other is constantly drooling, has runny eyes and sneezes, it’s eyes are bright, it has a good appetite and is very responsive. I am not sure wether to take it to the emergency clinic or just book an appointment with the regular vet tomorrow?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
It is possible that Meep has some allergy or irritation to the change in environment or there may be another cause like infection or other irritation; I don’t think this is a medical emergency unless breathing is laboured or you notice any other concerning symptoms. You could probably wait until tomorrow morning and ensure that Meep continues to eat and drink in the meantime. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Phoenix
short haired
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My cat was salivating; during this same week, he regurgitated his food twice on different occasions. Took him to the vet; received anti nausea medication, had xrays done, and his throat was checked for any foreign objects. Nothing was found. He is eating and drinking regularly as he is using his litter. Energy levels seem about the same. He’s fine now but I’m still worried about the underlying issue that was never discovered. I’m afraid we may be overlooking something
serious...no bloodwork has been taken. Any thoughts?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
There are various causes for excessive salivation which may include salivary gland disorders, infections, dental disorders (retained tooth etc…), foreign objects, chemical irritants, poisoning among other causes. You should keep a close eye on Phoenix to see if the condition recurs or if there are any new symptoms, also try to keep an eye on habits and other behaviour (licking of surfaces etc…). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Snowy
DOMESTIC
4 Months
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

not eating, not drinking water,

my cat, Snowy is just 4 1/2 months ... last monday afternoon he vomitted the food he ate (liquid vomit) and then he vomitted 3 more times ( a white foamy, saliva like liquid) ..when vomitting he is in discomfort... on 16th I took him to the vet and she gave him IV and some ijnections and she said that he might have been poisined with rat poison or something. After the injections also he vomitted 4-5 times ( white, yellowy foam ) ...within this time he didn;t eat anything or drank anything (only the IV given)
He wants to drink water. He goes near his water bowl and tries to put his mouth but take it away and licks his mouth shaking his head side to side .. and foamy, saliva like liquid pours out of his mouth.... I tried to force him some milk and water .. but as soon as he gets it in the mouth he throws up ..and I am afraid to feed him like that because it hurts him when throwing up.
he lies on his stomach not even moving ... I took him to the vet a she asked yesterday and she gave the IV and some injections .... and asked me to take him back today evening as well...
bus still my cat is showing no signs of recovery ..still not eating ..lying on the stomach .. not drinking any water...and drooling foamy liquid from mouth.
and he isn't passing urine or feces as well since 15th ...

please please help me .. I love my cat a lot .. I don;t want to loose him... please help

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm sorry that Snowy is having these problems. It seems that you are doing the best for him by having him seen by your veterinarian - make sure that you let them know the signs he is showing at home, as it can help them determine what is happening to him. He may need continued supportive care until he starts eating and drinking on his own. I'm not sure if an x-ray has been taken, but you should ave one taken to make sure that he doesn't have a foreign body. I hope that he is okay.

Thanks a lot doctor ... I told him everything. He said that he might have been poisoned with rat poison. He checked his toungue and mouth and said that there are no ulcers. Didn't take and x-ray though .. but gave him IV. and injections. He vomitted after I took him home (yellowish foam with a little bit of fluid ..may be the IV??? ) but thank god he urinated a bit too... Thankfully now he is at least walking a couple of steps towards his water bowl ... not walking a lot ..he seems still a lot tired... but at least he walked a bit ...
vomitted a couple of times after I took him back from the vet ... but now at least he rises his head up a bit sometimes and see when I talk to him ..

still he is lying on his stomach ... still some white foam is coming from his mouth sometimes ( with saliva I think and he tries to lick his mouth a when it happens )
the doctor asked me to bring him today evening as well to give IV as he isn't eating or drinking anything so far ...

Doctor, is there any advice please ? should I try to force feed him some milk with a syringe? what else should I do? He will be alright right doctor? I love him so much ...

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Moe
Cat
5 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling
Raw nose

My cat has all of a sudden got a raw patch or ulcer looking thing on the bottom of his nose that I think is begging to scab. He seems to have a little drainage either from the nose or the scab. He also started to drool while he sleeps which he has never done before. After I gave him a treat he spent a long time licking his mouth and I could hear/see him swallowing a lot with some constant movement of his mouth. He hasn’t cleaned himself in the past day but is still eating and drinking but seems hesitant when he goes to the food and water bowls. I tried to look in his mouth and his gums were regular with a very thin line of dark pink where the gum begins. He is a all around healthy cat and has only had one medical issue where he got part of his lip cut but was stitched up and healed right away.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. That ulcer sounds like it is painful for Moe, and he should be seen by your veterinarian to determine what the ulcer is, what is causing it, and how to treat it, so that it doesn't interfere with him eating and drinking. I hope that it is easily resolved by your veterinarian.

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Jaz
Maine Coon
16 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling

My cat has been drooling for a few weeks now. She's always been the cat to drool a little bit if she was super happy getting attention but this is way beyond that. She went to her regular vet who gave her a 2 week antibiotic shot because she had a cut on the underside of her tongue. She went back last Thursday but to a different vet who suspects an URI with nausea. She was given IV fluids and an anti-nausea shot and then sent home with drops for her nose and eyes and 2 weeks of pills. She's still drooling, though not quite as much. Neither vet saw an abscess or anything to clue them into what is really going on. Can you give me any possible other ideas to help the vets hone in on a possible cause? Or do you think we're right in thinking it's an URI and I just need to give my ol' girl (she's 16) some time to recover from it?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
494 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. A common cause of drooling in older cats is dental disease, and without seeing her, I can't comment on the health of her teeth or mouth. If she is still drooling even after treatment, it would be best to follow up with one of the veterinarians that you have seen, let them know that things aren't dramatically improved, and see if they have any suggestions to make her feel better. I hope that she recovers well.

That was checked at both visits, nothing to lead towards that.

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Boobando
I don't know
1+
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

It is very week, moves slowly, and often lays down or sits with it's head resting on the ground, it has a lot of saliva drooling from its mouth, please help ,it's been three days

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
Weakness, lethargy and drooling may be caused by a few different causes which may include dental disorders, infections, poisoning, liver disease among other causes; I would strongly recommend you visit your Veterinarian for an examination as there are a few possibilities with different treatments. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Skyler
Cat
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling

Hello
My cat has been drooling for a couple days now. It’s dripping like a faucet. I looked inside her mouth. Everything looks normal and no different smell. She’s acting her normal self, chasing the older cat, jumping on counters and table. We have canned fresh clams which she had a couple tiny pieces. Could that be the reason ?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
Excessive salivation may be caused by a few different causes which may include dental disorders, foreign objects, infections, poor oral hygiene, salivary gland disorders, irritations, poisoning or trauma. I understand that you have checked her mouth, but there may still be some issues there; without examining Skyler, I cannot say what the cause is. I would suggest rinsing out her mouth and keeping an eye on her, if the salivation continues you should visit your Veterinarian as the quantity described is concerning. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jax
Dlh
1 Year
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling

Woke up to my cat all of a sudden drooling alot. He's still eating and drinking water. He's using that bathroom from what i can tell. He will paying if u use a laser pointer but if not his energy levels have decreased and doesn't play with my other cats which he normally runs around with them.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
An increase in salivation may be caused by a long list of possible issues which may include licking something which is irritating to the mouth, dental disorders, infections, trauma, foreign bodies, stress, tumours among other causes. Have a look inside Jax mouth to see if you can see any possible issues, also rinse the mouth out in case an irritant was licked or swallowed. Keep an eye on Jax; but if you suspect that he may have consumed something toxic, visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Junior
Medium hair
About a year old
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Drooling
Drowsiness

My cat is drooling i came home from school today and he was asleep which is unusual and when i picked him up he made a sound like holding him was hurting him (very unusual) and hes drooling. Im taking him to the vet tomorrow but they dont know whats wrong with him and he has attachment issues i had to go away for a week and i had my friend house sit for me and when i came home my cat was way skinier

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1993 Recommendations
Drooling in cats is usually caused by oral irritation (from licking something), dental disorders (check inside the mouth), foreign objects, emotional drooling, infections among other disorders. If Junior is showing a pain response, it would be worth having a more comprehensive examination done by your Veterinarian since drooling is a symptom of some liver conditions as well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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