Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss Average Cost

From 435 quotes ranging from $200 - 2,000

Average Cost

$800

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What are Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss?

A dislocated tooth can be classified as either a luxation or avulsion. A tooth luxation is a tooth that has only been partially dislocated, moving vertically or laterally on the dental plane. Whereas, a tooth avulsion describes a tooth that has been completely dislocated from the dental socket. There are a number of subcategories for tooth luxation and avulsion, which must be properly diagnosed by a veterinary professional to deduce proper treatment.

If your cat has suffered trauma or injury to the mouth, she could experience tooth dislocation or sudden loss of a tooth. When a feline experiences head trauma, a tooth can easily be knocked out of place or removed completely upon impact. A dislocated tooth or sudden loss of a tooth is an urgent condition. Infection, nerve damage, and lesions can quickly arise from tooth related trauma, therefore, veterinary attention is a must.

Symptoms of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

Tooth dislocation or sudden loss of a tooth can be easily noted at times, especially if you are a present witness. However, some forms of tooth dislocation are difficult to spot and could go unnoticed until some of the following symptoms appear:

  • Bleeding 
  • Facial swelling
  • Swelling of the gums
  • Tooth discoloration
  • Excessive drooling
  • Pain 
  • Inability to chew or eat properly, leading to anorexia
  • A visibly altered tooth appearing abnormal in position or size
  • The tooth appears mobile indicating damage to the root
  • Malocclusion (misalignment of the teeth or jaw)  

Types

  • Concussion: A tooth that has undergone damage to the supporting structures including the roots, nerves and connective tissues, without visible displacement. 
  • Avulsion: A tooth that has been completely displaced from the dental socket. 
  • Extrusive luxation: A tooth that remains partially attached, but displaced outward from the dental socket. 
  • Intrusive luxation: A tooth that has been partially dislocated and pushed deep into the dental socket, appearing visually shorter. 
  • Lateral luxation: A tooth that is partially dislocated and easily moves from side to side on a lateral plane. 
  • Subluxation: A non-displaced tooth with damage to the underlying structures, causing it to be abnormally loose. 

Causes of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

Tooth dislocation or sudden loss of a tooth is a rather common occurrence for felines. Rough play, biting down on a hard object, cat fights, falls, and hit-by-car incidences can all result in tooth damage. The most commonly dislocated or tooth to be lost in felines is the upper fourth premolar and the canine tooth, as these teeth are located in the front of the mouth. If your cat suffers from poor dental health, tooth dislocation or sudden loss can become a common occurrence as dental disease weakens the dental structure. 

Diagnosis of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

Diagnosis of a tooth dislocation or sudden loss in cats can initially be done through a physical examination. A physical examination will indicate what type of tooth luxation your cat is experiencing and any evident of dental disease, such as gingivitis. The veterinarian will need to know when you first noticed the problem, what type of symptoms your cat has been experiencing and if you witnessed any recent injury your cat might have obtained to cause the dental trauma. The animal doctors will most likely backup his or her physical exam hypothesis with an x-ray examination. An x-ray will visualize which dental structures have been injured and any secondary injuries to the jaw that were not visible by the naked eye.

Treatment of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

If you witness the sudden loss of your cat’s tooth, locate the tooth and contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. Your veterinarian may advise you to gently rinse the tooth in milk or a saline solution, placing said tooth back into the open socket quickly to protect the delicate fibers of the periodontal ligaments. From there, your veterinarian may ask you to come into his/her veterinary practice immediately or refer you to a veterinary dentist.

A veterinary dentist can surgically fixate the dislocated tooth back into place using splints. However, if the blood or nerve supply has been damaged, this tooth could become a continuous problem for your cat. Infection of a once dislocated tooth is not uncommon and you may expect your cat to undergo a root canal at a later date, which is why many veterinarians advise to remove the tooth completely. 

Recovery of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

If your cat’s tooth was splinted, recovery time is about four to six weeks. At home, you will be advised to keep your cat on a soft food diet, rinsing the mouth with antiseptic solution after every meal to prevent infection. The mouth is full of bacteria, so the veterinarian will likely send you home with antibiotics to further prevent infection as well as pain medication. After the four to six weeks of recovery time, the splints will be removed and additional x-rays will be taken to ensure the tooth has, in fact, reattached. 

Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Hope
DOMESTIC
9 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Missing tooth

I just noticed that my cats cheek was sitting a bit weird on her face. I opened her mouth and her large fang is gone. She has been acting fine and eating her dry food regularly. Do I need to worry? She is 9 years old.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3203 Recommendations
A cat may lose a tooth for a variety of reasons but the main causes are trauma and diet; without examining Hope I cannot say whether or not there is anything to be concerned about or not. You should keep an eye on her for the time being and pop into your Veterinarian for an examination for a once over to be on the safe side to make sure there is nothing more serious to be concerned about. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Hershey
house cat
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Drool frang tooth loose

Just happened Hershey has a loose fang tooth he can not close mouth, no smell not showing problem until now.what can I do for him? I tried to look he was not nice.. now a bit of blood.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1526 Recommendations
That is probably an incredibly painful problem for Hershey, and he probably needs to see a veterinarian. They may need sedation to look at it and see what to do for him, but they'll be able to let you know more once they see it.

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Goonie
Calico
5 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Loose tooth

I think I accidentally jarred my cat’s fang loose. She bit me and startled me and I pulled my hand away suddenly and the tooth felt a little loose. Her gums are a little swollen and bleeding a little. The tooth looks to be in it’s normal place.its not protruding or sideways.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1526 Recommendations
If the tooth is loose, and Gonnie's gums are bleeding and appear sore, she should be examined by a veterinarian to have her dental health assessed. Her teeth should not be so loose that small things make them bleed, and she may need treatment for that. I hope that she is okay.

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Callie
Dsh,
Eight Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Hiding

Hi my cat, 8? y.o.fighting with my other cat, began making weird motions at her mouth with paw, like something was caught. Examined best I could and left incissor missing with visible blood wound from where tooth was. My concern is,(really poor) on ssi, how much care, meds r needed? Also if swallowed is xray needed and could it puncture organ or small bowel? Worried in Riverside, Ca.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1526 Recommendations
If Callie swallowed the tooth, there is very little concern for trauma, and that should not be a problem. I'm not sure how much care may be needed or medications without being able to see the severity of the problem, but if the tooth has come out, you may be okay to monitor her for pain or loss of appetite. Many clinics do offer free or discounted first exams that may let you have her seen.

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Kiko
Bombay
8 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Missing tooth

I just came home from college for the summer and noticed that my cat has completely lost her upper right canine. She seems fine, however--no bleeding, no swelling, no bad smell, no gum discoloration, etc. Shes acting fine and is still eating normally. I wouldn't even have noticed she was missing it had I not seen her yawn. Should I be worried? I don't know what caused this (or even when it happened because I haven't been home) but what can I do to prevent more of her teeth from falling out?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3203 Recommendations
The most common cause of sudden tooth loss is generally trauma, however other conditions may also lead to tooth loss which may include inadequate diet, internal diseases or poor oral hygiene. I cannot say without examining Kiko if she is at risk of losing any other teeth but would recommend you visit your Veterinarian to check her over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Socks
Black and white long haired outdoor cat
12 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Crooked tooth
Toungue out
Slavering

My cat had a fight with a fox that comes into our garden and the neighbors quite often. I scared it away but she put up a fight. The cat had blood on her paws but it seemed it was off the Fox not her. I looked at her jaw as she was chattering and her tooth seems slightly moved on it’s side, she has been drooling for about a hour and she tried leaving the house but I was too worried for her safety and kept her in. She’s now curled up in a ball asleep, it’d be too expensive for us to take her to a vet as it’s bank holiday but we are really worried. She’s about 12 years old but very healthy and we’ve never had to take her to the vets apart from when she had to stop having babies. We have switched her dry food to wet as she won’t be able to chew anything, she took interest but then went and sat back down. Please help :(

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3203 Recommendations
It is possible that Socks has an injury from the encounter with the fox which may have caused a injury to a tooth; without examining Sock I cannot confirm that this is the case but if Socks is hypersalivating it may be indicative of a dental injury. You should keep her calm for the time being and ensure she stays at least hydrated, but you should try to get veterinary care if she isn’t eating the wet food by tomorrow; once option may be to get smooth wet food and mix it with some water so that it can be syringed into the mouth slowly. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Becca
Idk
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Nothing I can see

My car just lost her front / top row big sharp tooth by injury. I was giving her a bath and she tried to jump out the tub and slipped, afterwards I automatically saw her opening and closing her mouth as if she had something in it. 10 minutes later I looked in her mouth and saw she lost her tooth. I’m really scared and just want to make sure she won’t have an infection. What should I do and is there any urgent issues with her tooth being lost.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3203 Recommendations
You should take care to ensure that no other teeth are affected and it is important to know if the tooth came out whole or if part of the root is broken off, if there is any part of the tooth remaining it may cause a serious complication. Ensure that Becca is eating and drinking, soft food may be best to start with but I would recommend you visit your Veterinarian to examine the mouth to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ozzy
Siamese
17 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Crying

My cat has an avulsion in his tooth but still has the tooth in. I was wondering if this can become worse, we will be getting the tooth removed but not suddenly because of cost. I also would like to know what to do to help with the pain and any home remedies that could briefly help and what to avoid

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1526 Recommendations
If that tooth has moved because of a trauma or dental disease, that may be quite painful for Ozzy. Without being able to see him, I am not sure what degree of care may be needed, but most OTC medications are quite toxic for cats and you need to be careful with what he is given for pain. It would be best to have him seen by a veterinarian to have the tooth looked and determine the best course of action. Most clinics do offer CareCredit to deal with unexpected expenses, and that may allow you to have the tooth taken care of sooner rather than later. I hope that he is okay.

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Snowball
Half Burmese, half black
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Abnormally positioned tooth,
Not eating as much

My cat came home last night with a tooth protruding out farther than normal. I checked inside his mouth and it just looked like the base of the tooth was dislocated. According to the article I just read, I would call it an extrusive luxation. From afar it looks like his right lip is really swollen but its actually just his tooth pushing his lip out. I didn't really see any swelling. He doesn't seem to be in too much pain because he'll still clean himself and let me pet his head. But he's not eating as much. So my question is, can I just sort of push his tooth back in? It's just like at a 45 degree angle outward(to the right) instead of pointing straight down. I heard this area heals quickly so I think he would be fine.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3203 Recommendations
The problem comes with these types of injuries when either the alveolar process is broken (the socket holding the root of the tooth), the blood supply is compromised to the tooth or combination of the two; I understand that you may want to simply push it back but many times this isn’t as straightforward as it initially seems, especially if there is something broken. You should consult with your Veterinarian and have an oral x-ray done if your Veterinarian feels it is necessary. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ruby
mixed
15 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Ruby is 15 yrs old,minimum. I adopted 6 months ago. Had extremely bad breath. Last month had trouble eating so switched to soft food as she was losing weight. Looked at teeth and upper rt canine seemed loose. Unemployed so can't take to vet. Found tooth on chair last night,still damp so recent loss, no blood anywhere. Seems to be the entire thing including root, very discolored and smelled rotten. No bleeding, no mouth smell anymore, no drooling, or even licking of lips. Can the hole in her gum heal on its own? I am beyond broke and she doesn't seem to be in pain.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3203 Recommendations
Just like in humans, the hole where the tooth sat will heal on its own but it may take some time given her age; you should also think about brushing her teeth regularly in the future if she is having rotten teeth. If Ruby eats kibbles, she may find it painful to eat but otherwise keep an eye on her and think about visiting a charity clinic to check her teeth. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Master Black
tabby
12 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No real symptoms. I just noticed.

I just noticed my 12yr old cat lost his top right canine tooth. What should I do? I wanted to make an appointment with a vet, but what will they say to do? I'm concerned about him. I looked at his gums, but I can't tell anything because his gum line has always been black. Please help. I'm not sure of the severity. Are there any cat beverages like protein shakes that I can give him? I'm giving him wet and dry food. I will stop the dry.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3203 Recommendations
You should take Master Black to your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side since I cannot determine whether the whole tooth came out or of there is a fragment of root left behind; your Veterinarian will be able to check all of this and will be about to guide you better on whether there are any underlying issues or not (they may want to take a dental x-ray). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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