Jump to section

What are Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss?

A dislocated tooth can be classified as either a luxation or avulsion. A tooth luxation is a tooth that has only been partially dislocated, moving vertically or laterally on the dental plane. Whereas, a tooth avulsion describes a tooth that has been completely dislocated from the dental socket. There are a number of subcategories for tooth luxation and avulsion, which must be properly diagnosed by a veterinary professional to deduce proper treatment.

If your cat has suffered trauma or injury to the mouth, she could experience tooth dislocation or sudden loss of a tooth. When a feline experiences head trauma, a tooth can easily be knocked out of place or removed completely upon impact. A dislocated tooth or sudden loss of a tooth is an urgent condition. Infection, nerve damage, and lesions can quickly arise from tooth related trauma, therefore, veterinary attention is a must.

Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss Average Cost

From 435 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,000

Average Cost

$800

Symptoms of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

Tooth dislocation or sudden loss of a tooth can be easily noted at times, especially if you are a present witness. However, some forms of tooth dislocation are difficult to spot and could go unnoticed until some of the following symptoms appear:

  • Bleeding 
  • Facial swelling
  • Swelling of the gums
  • Tooth discoloration
  • Excessive drooling
  • Pain 
  • Inability to chew or eat properly, leading to anorexia
  • A visibly altered tooth appearing abnormal in position or size
  • The tooth appears mobile indicating damage to the root
  • Malocclusion (misalignment of the teeth or jaw)  

Types

  • Concussion: A tooth that has undergone damage to the supporting structures including the roots, nerves and connective tissues, without visible displacement. 
  • Avulsion: A tooth that has been completely displaced from the dental socket. 
  • Extrusive luxation: A tooth that remains partially attached, but displaced outward from the dental socket. 
  • Intrusive luxation: A tooth that has been partially dislocated and pushed deep into the dental socket, appearing visually shorter. 
  • Lateral luxation: A tooth that is partially dislocated and easily moves from side to side on a lateral plane. 
  • Subluxation: A non-displaced tooth with damage to the underlying structures, causing it to be abnormally loose. 
arrow-up-icon

Top

Causes of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

Tooth dislocation or sudden loss of a tooth is a rather common occurrence for felines. Rough play, biting down on a hard object, cat fights, falls, and hit-by-car incidences can all result in tooth damage. The most commonly dislocated or tooth to be lost in felines is the upper fourth premolar and the canine tooth, as these teeth are located in the front of the mouth. If your cat suffers from poor dental health, tooth dislocation or sudden loss can become a common occurrence as dental disease weakens the dental structure. 

arrow-up-icon

Top

Diagnosis of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

Diagnosis of a tooth dislocation or sudden loss in cats can initially be done through a physical examination. A physical examination will indicate what type of tooth luxation your cat is experiencing and any evident of dental disease, such as gingivitis. The veterinarian will need to know when you first noticed the problem, what type of symptoms your cat has been experiencing and if you witnessed any recent injury your cat might have obtained to cause the dental trauma. The animal doctors will most likely backup his or her physical exam hypothesis with an x-ray examination. An x-ray will visualize which dental structures have been injured and any secondary injuries to the jaw that were not visible by the naked eye.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Treatment of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

If you witness the sudden loss of your cat’s tooth, locate the tooth and contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. Your veterinarian may advise you to gently rinse the tooth in milk or a saline solution, placing said tooth back into the open socket quickly to protect the delicate fibers of the periodontal ligaments. From there, your veterinarian may ask you to come into his/her veterinary practice immediately or refer you to a veterinary dentist.

A veterinary dentist can surgically fixate the dislocated tooth back into place using splints. However, if the blood or nerve supply has been damaged, this tooth could become a continuous problem for your cat. Infection of a once dislocated tooth is not uncommon and you may expect your cat to undergo a root canal at a later date, which is why many veterinarians advise to remove the tooth completely. 

arrow-up-icon

Top

Recovery of Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss in Cats

If your cat’s tooth was splinted, recovery time is about four to six weeks. At home, you will be advised to keep your cat on a soft food diet, rinsing the mouth with antiseptic solution after every meal to prevent infection. The mouth is full of bacteria, so the veterinarian will likely send you home with antibiotics to further prevent infection as well as pain medication. After the four to six weeks of recovery time, the splints will be removed and additional x-rays will be taken to ensure the tooth has, in fact, reattached. 

arrow-up-icon

Top

*Wag! may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. Items are sold by the retailer, not Wag!.

Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss Average Cost

From 435 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,000

Average Cost

$800

arrow-up-icon

Top

Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

question-icon-cta

Ask a Vet

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Domestic cat

dog-age-icon

7or 8

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

None

My cat's front right canine is all of a sudden lost. There is no drooling or any symptoms of concern that I have noticed. She throws up her food here and there, but not enough that it concerns me. I am just genuinely surprised that this tooth is lost. Should I be concerned?

July 28, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I would be a little bit concerned, yes. It is possible that there was a trauma that made that tooth come out, and if not, then she may have some significant dental disease. It would probably be best to have an examination for her with your veterinarian, as they can assess her mouth and teeth, and see if she needs any treatment. I hope that all goes well for her.

July 28, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Domestic Shorthair

dog-age-icon

Nine Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Loose Tooth?

My cat's tooth recently shifted location. He has lost a tooth before...what do I do?

July 25, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. If he is losing teeth and they are moving in the tooth socket, there is probably a lot of periodontal and dental disease in his mouth, as those teeth are not meant to move around. It would be best to have a veterinarian examine him and look at his teeth and mouth. They will be able to give you a better idea as to what treatment is necessary once they have seen his teeth. I hope that all goes well for him!

July 25, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Domestic shorthair

dog-age-icon

Seventeen Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

I just noticed she is missing her fang. No bleeding but does have slight odor of her breath. She has also started vomiting daily. Sometimes undigested foods sometimes clear fld.

July 21, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Without seeing her, unfortunately, it is hard to comment on whether her dental disease is causing her vomiting, or there is something else going on. If her canine tooth actually fell out on its own, that can signify some significant periodontal disease, and that should probably be looked at by a veterinarian. That may be causing her vomiting, or there may be another reason. Your veterinarian will be able to look at her, see what might be going on, and let you know what treatment options are available for her. I hope that everything goes well for her.

July 21, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

El nino

dog-breed-icon

dsh

dog-age-icon

15 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Bleeding

My cats canine tooth was bleeding yesterday but didn't seem to loose from what he allowed me to do. I have an appointment schedule for him but I have a question. I have a fear because it is the big tooth, if it gets knocked out or falls out, is there a possibility of him bleeding out if I'm not home?

Sept. 12, 2018

El nino's Owner

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

Master Black

dog-breed-icon

tabby

dog-age-icon

12 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

thumbs-up-icon

1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

No Real Symptoms. I Just Noticed.

I just noticed my 12yr old cat lost his top right canine tooth. What should I do? I wanted to make an appointment with a vet, but what will they say to do? I'm concerned about him. I looked at his gums, but I can't tell anything because his gum line has always been black. Please help. I'm not sure of the severity. Are there any cat beverages like protein shakes that I can give him? I'm giving him wet and dry food. I will stop the dry.

Aug. 6, 2018

Master Black's Owner

answer-icon

recommendation-ribbon

3320 Recommendations

You should take Master Black to your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side since I cannot determine whether the whole tooth came out or of there is a fragment of root left behind; your Veterinarian will be able to check all of this and will be about to guide you better on whether there are any underlying issues or not (they may want to take a dental x-ray). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Aug. 6, 2018

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

Julian (Poopy)

dog-breed-icon

DOMESTIC

dog-age-icon

3 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Drooling
Swollen
Meowing Different

retnev My cat wouldn't get in the cage for bed and my husband chased him around with a broom. My cat freaked out and attacked and bit the broom. Now his mouth is bleeding!!! What do I do??!!!

dog-name-icon

Apple

dog-breed-icon

Common

dog-age-icon

Six Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

My cat is 6months old and she vomitted one time last night and when i wake up this morning i ame to know that shevhas loosen her tooth. Is it serious? What should i do? What could be the reason?

dog-name-icon

Penny

dog-breed-icon

Blue Persian

dog-age-icon

15 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

None

my persian cat penny lost her left top fang a couple of weeks ago shes 15 yo but what is puzzling is .. it looks like shes got a new one growing ive felt it and its pointy and deffo a tooth the other week there was just a hole nothing there ... can cats get new teeth at this age? it surely cant of been a baby tooth it was HUGE - im baffled 🤔.

dog-name-icon

Gizzy

dog-breed-icon

Calico

dog-age-icon

12 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Lost Tooth And Diarrhea

My cats fang tooth was found on the bed with a small amount of blood a few days ago. She seems fine as far as she is still eating dry food and drinking. She doesn't seem uncomfortable. But I came home today and noticed she had diarrhea. I'm afraid she has an infection. We don't have a vet for our indoor cats.

dog-name-icon

Turbo

dog-breed-icon

Maine Coon

dog-age-icon

11 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

Bleeding,
Bleeding, Licking The Gap

So my big boy turbo that's 11 months old had a tooth knocked out from a fight between him and two other cats and it was one in the far back top of the mouth I want to know if he will be ok and if I have to take him to the vet bc I currently cant afford to take him to the vet to be looked at any answer will be appreciated one of the other cats was his twin sister gigi these cats are my ESA cats so I love them to death bc they do great with my family and they love on them

Tooth Dislocation or Sudden Loss Average Cost

From 435 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,000

Average Cost

$800