Cyst on the Gums Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $200 - 2,500

Average Cost

$800

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What are Cyst on the Gums?

Cysts on the gums in dogs are benign growths or lesions that can become larger and fill with fluid. Also known as dentigerous cysts, they can contain embedded teeth or teeth that have not yet erupted. If not treated, they can cause damage to the bone, tissue, and teeth. They can become very painful, and once the dog develops the symptoms, they are hard to ignore, thus prompting a trip to the veterinarian.

The first premolars are the teeth that are most likely to be affected by dentigerous cysts. They are also the most common type of cysts found in the mouths of dogs. It is highly important to maintain regular dental check-ups with your veterinarian so that any cyst on the gums can be found in the very early stages.

Fortunately, veterinarians are aware of what to look for and what breeds are more susceptible to acquiring these types of cysts. Dentigerous cysts can occur from genetics or other factors.

Cysts on the gums in dogs, or dentigerous cysts, occur when a tooth or teeth have become embedded under the gum from overcrowding or other reasons. This type of cyst forms under the gum, yet on top of the embedded tooth, producing pain and inflammation.

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Symptoms of Cyst on the Gums in Dogs

When a dog has a cyst on the gum, it usually goes unnoticed in the beginning, unless the dog has received a recent veterinarian visit. Once the cyst begins to “form” or grow, symptoms that occur are:

  • Difficulty eating
  • Swollen jaw or face
  • Mouth pain
  • A space in the gum where a tooth should be
  • A lump that can be felt along the gum line

Types

Cysts forming on the gums of dogs occur more often in certain breeds. Small breeds and breeds with shorter muzzles tend to suffer from this condition, which can become quite troublesome if not found early. Damage to the tooth, the bone, and the gum tissue can occur if the cyst grows over time. Type of breeds more susceptible to dentigerous cysts are:

  • English Bulldog
  • French Bulldog
  • Pug
  • Boxer
  • Boston Terrier
  • Pekingese

Causes of Cyst on the Gums in Dogs

Causes of dentigerous cysts depend on the breed, as many breeds are genetically prone to getting these cysts. It is important to regularly check the gums for missing teeth to be sure none are embedded, and if they are, to get treatment. Causes include:

  • Embedded teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Trauma to the jaw or mouth
  • Genetics

Diagnosis of Cyst on the Gums in Dogs

The veterinarian will do a thorough physical examination, and if the symptoms are present, will focus on the mouth, face, and jaw areas. He will perform testing, such as clinical tests and imaging (radiography) to get a closer look as to what is happening to cause any lump or other symptoms that are noted. 

The veterinarian will differentiate between the types of cysts that can occur, such as a tumor, granuloma, or abscess and the radiograph will help the veterinarian determine the precise type of cyst.

What the veterinarian will see in the image is a tooth that has not yet come through the gum that is surrounded by a lesion that is shown on the radiograph. He may also see damage to the tooth, bone, or gum tissue from the imaging. The veterinarian will also be able to tell if the gum is infected and to what degree.

Treatment of Cyst on the Gums in Dogs

Depending on the diagnosis, the treatment may vary slightly. If the cyst is large and damage has occurred, then the treatment may be more complex. Treatment options include:

Surgery

Surgery is the prime method for treating cysts on the gums. The veterinarian will remove the cyst, including the entire lining. He will then “clean out” the affected area where the cyst was to remove any debris or infection. The cyst may also be sent off to a lab to be sure it is not a different type of growth other than a dentigerous cyst.

Root Canal

If the tooth affected is a “dead” tooth, the veterinarian will perform a root canal on the tooth to keep the tooth intact. Tooth extraction is not always an option because more damage to the jaw bone may occur during the extraction. 

Grafting

If the bone was damaged, the veterinarian will choose to do a synthetic bone to replace the lost bone that has occurred. This will strengthen the bone of the jaw, if necessary. This can be accomplished during the surgery. Bone grafting is not always needed, especially if the cyst was identified in the early stages.

 

Recovery of Cyst on the Gums in Dogs

After surgery, the veterinarian will give you instructions on aftercare and management. The dog may have to eat softer foods for a little while, and be sure to have him drink plenty of clean water each day. If an infection was present, the veterinarian may prescribe an antibiotic, or he may prescribe pain medication if he feels the dog will need it for a few days. You may need to keep an eye on him to be sure he is not “pawing” at his mouth so the sutures can stay intact.

Regular visits will be scheduled to check on the healing of the site, and if any complications do occur, the veterinarian will be able to diagnose them early. It is important to keep your appointments right after the surgery to be sure your companion is healing properly. 

Once he is healed and feeling himself again, he can resume a normal, happy life; the prognosis is good for dogs with dentigerous cysts.

Cyst on the Gums Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Kloe
German Shepherd
8 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

N/A

My 8yr old German Shepard/ Doberman Pinscher has this ball like lump on her gums. It keeps getting bigger and we don't know what it is. She eats normal, chews on her toys normally, it just looks really bad.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2992 Recommendations
If the lump is similar to the picture in the image, it may be an epulis which is a type of benign tumour; other causes may be due to other tumours, cysts, other growths among other causes. You should have the Kloe checked by your Veterinarian to be on the safe side and possibly have the lump removed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM http://vetsinwindsor.com/clients/7732/images/Dentistry/Interesting_Cases/EPULUIS/12778822_1740005182898603_2027203721472581259_o.jpg

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Lily
Small mix
6 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

acts normal

I Have a 6 year old small rescue dog. I was brushing her teeth the other day when i came across a tiny white bump on her gums. I have never seen that before. I was just wonderin wha it can be. I don't want it to get bigger on her. She has an appointment in a couple of weeks for her annual exam. Should i get her in sooner. She eats and plays normally with her brother.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2992 Recommendations
If Lily is otherwise in good health, you should check the bump for any sign of it growing in size before the appointment; monitor it but if there are any changes you should get her an appointment earlier, also if the appointment is more than three weeks away get her in sooner. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tula
miniature poodle
7 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Flesh gum colored bump in mouth

My miniature poodle mix had 2 teeth extracted a few weeks ago. A gum colored bump has developed where the tooth was extracted. Is this normal? She is otherwise healthy and no longer has smelly breath. The bump is located in the upper front teeth it seems to be attached right where the tooth was pulled or slightly behind it.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1406 Recommendations
Gum tissue may react to a trauma by 'over growing', and this may be a normal thing to happen for Tula. Since the extraction was so recent, it would be a good idea to have a recheck with your veterinarian to make sure that there isn't any infection or abnormal growth occurring. I hope that all goes well for her!

Thank you so much Dr. King! I kept searching the Internet and came across an article about an incisive papilla. The bump looks exactly like that and what a relief! The bump is right behind her newly extracted front tooth.
This service is awesome and thank you again for your reply from both Tula and I.

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Goldie
Labrador Retriever
15 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Ooze n blood growth

Medication Used

Giving silver nitrate solution 15 %

My lab 15yrs has gum growth treated twice with operations but still continue to come 1st biopsy says fibrous 2nd is awaited doc giving silver nitrate solution 15%to shed it but blood n ooze cmg out... Please advise

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2992 Recommendations

Continued bleeding and oozing may be attributable to secondary infection or to low blood platelet counts leading to poor clotting; healing of wounds in the oral cavity can be hindered by the moist environment. Goldie may require a course of antibiotics and something to help with clotting; some products like Yunnan Baiyao may help with the reduction of bleeding, but you should return to your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Dre
Pit bull
5 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

My 5 month pitbull puppy is starting to grow a soft bump on his gums. He eats normally, play normally, does everything a normal 5 month puppy would do but just have this bump in his mouth.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1406 Recommendations
The bump may be normal for a dog who is teething, or it may be an unusual growth. Unfortunately, without seeing the bump, I can't determine if it is normal. It would be best to have him examined by your veterinarian at his next appointment to have it looked at, as they can see it and let you know if it is a problem or not.

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Buster
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
9 years 2 months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Sleeps alot
Tired

Medication Used

Been given radilla I think it called50mg

My staffy who is 9 n 3 months old has a red angry swelling which is in his gum hanging over his canine tooth.He banged his nose 9 months ago after couple of months very small lump appeared. Thought just be bone growth from bumping his nose. Growth just stayed same then over this last few months started to grow. Just happened to check his teeth n saw this argot red swelling looks like small 2 grapes .He is sleeping a lot,drinking quiet abit in the house. But think might be due to the dry heat in the house. Is weeing normally have not seen any blood or discharge from nose. Has he has swelling also on bridge of his nose. He is eating ok his bowls habits seem normal no blood.He is getting grumpy n rolls his throat abit. But when give him a cuddle he goes ok. I am concerned it could be something bad.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2992 Recommendations
It is difficult to say what the specific cause is without examining Buster, oral growths can be relatively innocent or can be malignant tumours; an examination by your Veterinarian would be required and it also surgical excision may be required as well. These types of growths can ulcerate and get infected easily due to their location. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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