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What is Mucus in the Stool?

Some mucus is normal and necessary in order to facilitate the movement of the waste through the bowels. When the amount of this mucus increases in volume or changes color or smell this could signal a problem developing for your dog. The underlying issues that can cause this sign range from benign to untreatable, depending on the cause. Because some of the causes of mucus in stool can be time sensitive it's best to contact your veterinarian as soon a possible, especially if the dog has other signs such as diarrhea or fever.

Most stool includes some mucus to facilitate its movement through the bowels. Increases or changes in the mucus composition of your dog’s stool may be indicative of underlying conditions.

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Mucus in the Stool Average Cost

From 73 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,500

Average Cost

$250

Symptoms of Mucus in the Stool in Dogs

Small amounts of mucus within the stool generally isn’t a problem by itself. If it is much larger amounts than you normally see or if paired with the following signs, a call to the veterinarian is warranted and a stool sample should be gathered.

  • Abdominal pain
  • Accompanied by diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Only mucus is being expelled
  • Refusal to eat or drink
  • The mucus has a color
  • There is a change in color in the stools
  • Vomiting

Types

 

There are changes to the feces that may occur concurrently.

Black and tarry

  • This color and texture are generally caused by blood from the stomach or upper intestine
  • If you see this kind of stool, collect it and call your veterinarian as soon as possible

Blood in stool (red)

  • This is fresh blood in the stool which may indicate bleeding in the lower intestines
  • Collect a sample and seek veterinary attention

Diarrhea

  • Diarrhea is often caused by a viral or bacterial infection, but there are other triggers
  • Dogs with diarrhea are at high risk for dehydration and should be monitored closely
  • If blood clots are also seen the situation should be treated as urgent 

Grey and greasy looking

  • Usually caused by too much fat in the food 

Worms

  • Worms in the stool are parasites
  • Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for prompt diagnosis and treatment
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Causes of Mucus in the Stool in Dogs

There are a number of things that can cause increased mucus in the stool, ranging from the benign to the lethal. 

  • Blood in the intestine
  • Changes in diet
  • Colitis
  • Eating inappropriate food items
  • Food allergies
  • Foreign object
  • Overgrowth of bacteria
  • Parasites
  • Polyps or tumors
  • Stress
  • Toxins
  • Viral or bacterial infection
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Diagnosis of Mucus in the Stool in Dogs

In order to make a diagnosis your veterinarian will want a full history of the animal, as well as a general physical exam. Questions regarding your dog’s diet and appetite will be asked, as well as inquiries about whether any vomiting or diarrhea has been recently observed. A biochemistry profile, complete blood count, and urinalysis may be recommended to determine the underlying cause. A colonoscopy and a fecal float may also be recommended. The fecal float test can help your veterinarian to determine if adult parasites are present in the canine’s system and the colonoscopy allows a visual inspection of the large intestine to detect tears or other inconsistencies. If a definitive diagnosis has not been determined by this point, additional tests will depend on signs and on the results of previous tests. If foreign objects or tumors are suspected x-ray and ultrasound imaging may be used to try and detect them.

If your dog is at risk of developing mucusy stool, check out ourpet insurance comparison tool. Brought to you by Pet Insurer, Wag! Wellness lets pet parents compare insurance plans from leading companies like FIGO and Nationwide.

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Treatment of Mucus in the Stool in Dogs

Treatment of mucus in the stool will depend on the underlying cause. As the causes of increased mucus in the stool can cover a large range of underlying causes, the treatments are also many. In cases of indiscriminate eating or stress, it may clear up with no further treatment. A short term change to bland, easily digestible foods may be a beneficial change, and in some mild cases your veterinarian may recommend antidiarrheal mediations. If your pet has a viral, bacterial, parasitic or fungal infection, the proper medication to clear up the disease will be prescribed, and if food allergies or sensitivities are diagnosed then a hypoallergenic diet may be recommended. Probiotics may also be recommended to help the patient recover, especially after antibiotic or antifungal treatments. If a tumor or another growth is involved, it may require surgical excision which may be followed by chemotherapy.

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Recovery of Mucus in the Stool in Dogs

Depending on the underlying cause, recovery and management methods can be extremely variable. You will need to make sure that you make any changes to your dog’s diet or environment as recommended by your veterinarian, and if your pet was prescribed any medication it is imperative that you give them the entire course to prevent reoccurrence of the problem.
The dietary and lifestyle changes for some patients may be short-term or life-long dependent on the cause. Although some issues are mild enough not to warrant a return trip to the veterinarian, many other disorders will require an additional visit to check how the patient is responding to treatment.

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Mucus in the Stool Average Cost

From 73 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,500

Average Cost

$250

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Mucus in the Stool Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Ask a Vet

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Shih Tzu

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Four Years

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Unknown severity

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6 found helpful

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Orangey diarrhea with mucus and vomiting

April 10, 2021

Owner

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Dr. Linda S. MVB MRCVS

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6 Recommendations

Mucus in the stool indicates lower gut inflammation (colitis). As she is also vomiting she is at risk of dehydration and it is best she is assessed so we can ensure she is well hydrated and doesn't have a fever or abdominal pain. The vet may well need to issue treatment such as antibiotics, an anti nausea injection and fluids.

April 10, 2021

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mix

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Six Weeks

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Unknown severity

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9 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Mucus Stool

Pooping mucus. But also just changed dog food brands

Jan. 31, 2021

Owner

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Dr. Linda S. MVB MRCVS

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9 Recommendations

An abrupt diet change can lead to diarrhoea and mucus in the stool. Other potential causes include an infection, stress, parasites etc. Be sure the pup is otherwise well and up to date with their parasite prevention. If signs continue or they seem unwell, a vet visit is best.

Jan. 31, 2021

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Mucus in the Stool Average Cost

From 73 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,500

Average Cost

$250

Vet bills can sneak up on you.

Plan ahead. Get the pawfect insurance plan for your pup.

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