Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning Average Cost

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Average Cost

$4,000

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What is Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning?

Poisoning by use of ivermectin is well documented. Most cases of adverse reaction result due to overdose of the product, and toxicity due to sensitivity because of a genetic mutation, MDR1 (multi-drug resistance gene), specific to certain breeds. This medication is given orally (tablets, treats, liquids, pastes), by injection, and as a topical solution against mites. Signs of poisoning are many and include blindness, tremors, and uncoordinated movements as a result of nerve and brain toxicity . There is no treatment for the poisoning; supportive measures are the only care available (though in cases of oral administration inducing of vomiting and active charcoal use are often done). Early and aggressive supportive care allows for a good prognosis for recovery.

Ivermectin is used in the treatment of parasitic diseases, one of the most well known being heartworm disease. Ivermectin belongs to the avermectin family of drugs and has been approved for multiple uses. Toxicity has been documented, with adverse effects due to the cross between the blood brain barrier.

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Symptoms of Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning in Dogs

Symptoms of ivermectin poisoning can appear approximately within 5 hours to 24 hours after the administration of the drug.

  • Dilation of pupils
  • Abnormal reflex of pupils
  • Vomiting
  • Abnormal behavior
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Confusion
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Stupor
  • Low body temperature
  • Hypersalivation
  • Loss of body control
  • Inability to stand
  • Respiratory collapse
  • Seizure
  • Death

Types

Poisoning will occur as a result of overdosage, as well as sensitivity to the drug due to the MDR1 genetic mutation. Breeds documented as having a predisposition to this problem are as follows.

  • Collie
  • Old English and Shetland Sheepdogs
  • Australian, English, and German Shepherds
  • McNab
  • Silken Windhound
  • Long Haired Whippet
  • Herding breed cross

Causes of Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning in Dogs

Administration error (for example, an owner gives part of a tablet meant for a larger dog to their smaller dog)

  • Doubling up of a missed dose
  • Drug interaction with another medication
  • MDR1 mutation in susceptible breeds
  • Licking off of topical solution by your pet, or licking the solution off of an animal housemate
  • Use of livestock ivermectin on domestic animals

Diagnosis of Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning in Dogs

The sooner the symptoms of poisoning appear, the more serious the toxic effects will be. If you have given your pet a treatment of ivermectin, if he has accidentally ingested the drug, or if you have administered a topical dose and see signs that show he is suffering from toxicity, immediate veterinary care is essential. Take your canine companion to the veterinarian or emergency clinic right away, bringing the drug packaging if available. 

Diagnosis will be based on clinical signs, the first symptom often seen is dilated pupils. There is no test available for ivermectin poison confirmation other than the serum ivermectin concentration found in the blood. Test results are not always immediate; therefore, action will be taken most likely before the results are known.

Treatment of Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning in Dogs

The veterinary team will begin supportive care immediately which may include treatment for shock, intravenous fluids, eye lubrication, and corticosteroids. In some cases, active charcoal will be used in an attempt to bind the poison together for quicker expulsion from the body. Gastric lavage will be done if deemed helpful and appropriate.

A diagnosis of ivermectin poisoning will mean a hospital stay for your canine family member. As the effects of the toxin can be quite severe, a lengthy stay is typically the case. It is not unusual in the first hours and days of treatment for a canine to have a decline in health as the toxins take more effect, and then a gradual improvement as the therapy enables your pet to improve. During the hospital stay, the veterinary team will work to ensure that your dog is as comfortable as possible. Clean bedding will always be in place, and the team will move your dog’s position regularly to aid in his well-being. 

Your pet will probably be sedated for much of the time as he recovers because there may be a need for medication to control seizures or tremors, for example, and it is not uncommon for treatment to include mechanical ventilation in serious cases. Studies have shown that many canines will have effects like recumbency (periods of complete rest), coma, seizure, and inability to eat or drink, among other effects before recovery takes place. The recovery can be very slow, meaning weeks to months, before your pet returns to normal.

Recovery of Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning in Dogs

When your dog is released from the hospital, he may need extra care from you at home as he recovers. Many dogs will have a convalescence stage of several weeks to months as they improve in health. Your veterinarian will be available and willing to assist you in many ways as you take care of your beloved family member.

It is crucial to note and remember that when using the drug ivermectin, advice and monitoring by your veterinarian is paramount. Not only is there the concern of the poison, there are other complications to be mindful of in regards to the use of ivermectin. Allergic shock is possible because if the ivermectin kills heartworm larvae that are present in the dog, the sudden death of the larvae can cause a reaction. As well, if there are heartworms present in a pet, and ivermectin is administered, the dead parasites can remain in the arteries and heart, causing an obstruction. This is why a heartworm test must be done before administration and if they are found they must be removed with another medication first.

Parasitic Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Tucker
Maltese
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Blindness

My dog ingested livestock ivermectin, and has gone blind. He has been in the hospital for 4 days, and while there they've give him both fluids and activated charcoal. He is being released today. His pupils started reacting to light yesterday, but since then there have been no improvements. What is the likely hood that he will regain his eye sight?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
Ivermectin induced blindness may reverse but there are no solid guarantees that sight will be restored; recovery may take a few weeks so you would need to be patient. I cannot find any specific statistics or data which would be able to give you a better idea. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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mark
German Shepherd
6 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Walk Unevenly

i have overdose neomec 10mg tab to my dog but he is fine only difference i am seeing was unsteadiness when walking buy he is looking good it is almost 20 hours back i give him tablet when he can be normal. just saw a slight different in walk rather than that is find

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
Overdose of Neomec (ivermectin) may cause neurological symptoms when in high enough doses; there is no specific treatment but due to enterohepatic recirculation, you can administer activated charcoal initially at 1-2g/kg (0.5-1g/lb) then at 0.5-1g/kg (0.25-0.5g/lb) every eight hours until 36 hours after ingestion. You should also visit your Veterinarian to assess symptoms to determine if any additional care is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.cliniciansbrief.com/sites/default/files/attachments/Ivermectin%20Toxicosis.pdf

Our doctor prescribed 3 neomac 10 at once and repeat it after 10 days. Now we find our doggy has some problem with his hind leg. What to do?

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Tiny
Chihuahua
8 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

Hi my 8yr old chihuahua cross was given ivomec last week and now she is vomiting and just isn’t her happy self anymore she even twitching 😢 The veterinarian that visits our village won’t be back until March.& the next town is 3hrs away what can I do for her? 😢🙏🏼

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
If the cause of the symptoms is due to ivermectin poisoning, there is no direct treatment apart from supportive care; however, a week is a long time for symptoms to develop. Whilst I understand that a Veterinarian may be three hours away, I cannot recommend anything for you to do at home and the symptoms may be due to a different cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Maggie
Labradinger
4 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

I had been at the stables with my dog, when we arrived home she started shaking and deteriorating rapidly so rushed her to vets. They tried to sedate her with diazepam which didn't work as she was seizing so they put her under anaesthetic. At this point I hadn't realised she had been sick in the back of the car, it was mostly horse poo but being a lab she would sniff around the horses feed bowls and eat any spillage. They ran tests but as I hadn't seen she had been sick we had no idea what we were dealing with. They kept her in over night but every time they reduced the amount of anaesthetic she would start seizing again. So she started showing signs of illness at 4pm and by 5am the following day the vet said she wasn't improving so there was nothing else to do but put her to sleep.
I now realise she had probably eaten horse wormer and having read this article it seems there may have been hope and she could've recovered if she'd been given more time. If we'd realised earlier it was ivermectin could she have been treated differently or given more time? Especially as she'd probably vomited up most of the wormer.
We kept asking if there was any chance she might still recover and the vet was adamant she wouldn't.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1098 Recommendations
Thank you for your question - I'm so sorry for your loss, that is very sad. If she did eat ivermectin, the margin of safety for that drug is small. A dosage for a horse would easily kill a dog, and there really isn't any treatment for it other than long term life support on ventilators and being hospitalized until it clears their system, which can take weeks to months, depending on the overdose. It is possible that it was any number of other toxins or overdosage of medications, and without knowing what it was, all you could have done is treat her signs. I am truly sorry for you, and for Maggie.

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Ghost
Pit Heeler
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

Our pit-mix ran away and was taken to our local Humane Society as a stray. Before we tracked down his whereabouts, they had already vaccinated, neutered, and given a topical a flea and heartworm preventative. He's been sick since we brought him home. His symptoms include diarrhea, vomitting, coughing, decreased appetite, sneezing, and increased urination indoors. He has gotten any better after two weeks. Could be poisoning from the heartworm preventative? Or maybe a reaction to vaccines? Or possible infection from surgery?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
There may be many different things going on here and the possible stress from the Humane Society and the whole ordeal may be causing some incontinence and other symptoms; the gastrointestinal symptoms may be due to stress, infections as well as side effects from medications. Check with the Human Society to see which specific medications were given to Ghost so that a check of the adverse reactions etc… can be seen. I would suggest visiting your regular Veterinarian for a checkup and if you haven’t already get him microchipped as well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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July
Country
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Medication Used

Ivermectin

Hi ..we gave extra tablets to our pet ..the tablet is ivermectin..now it has lethargy ..dilated pupil..can't stand ..reply for this question sir I want to know whether the effects will return back to normal ?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
Some breeds of dogs are sensitive to ivermectin (and other medications) due to the MDR1 gene which is common in Collie breeds and others; this is why ivermectin isn’t approved for use in dogs and is used extra label by Veterinarians at their discretion in certain cases. I would strongly suggest visiting a Veterinarian immediately to determine July’s overall condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.cliniciansbrief.com/sites/default/files/attachments/Ivermectin%20Toxicosis.pdf http://vcpl.vetmed.wsu.edu/problem-drugs www.aht.org.uk/cms-display/genetics_mdr.html

How long does ivermectin stay viable in frozen Horse manure

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Hero
Mixed
5 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Blindness,
Weakness
vomit yellow color fluid
keep fall down
unable to stand and walk like normal

Hi, my dog have a tablet of parasite drug last week and my dad gave another kind of parasite drug in powder form yesterday. This cause overdose of parasite drug and i found my dog suffer blindness in this morning. I unable to get a vet to treat my dog since all the doctors are away. A vet assistant said it caused by overdose of parasite drug and it is temporary blindness. He gave a bottle of fish oil supplement for my dog. May i know any other steps or treatments for my dog?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations

Blindness isn’t a common symptom in dogs for ivermectin toxicity (more common in cats). Ivermectin toxicity can be severe and may require long-term supportive care. Eye ointment for lubrication may be required and ensure that Hero remains hydrated; I cannot prescribe anything as I haven’t examined Hero, but as soon as a Veterinarian returns go for a visit. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

what to say ...i gt a small dog of 4 weeks only ...no breed ,it was a desi dog , his mother died after giving birth to 10 puppies due to some insect bite...i had no experience of caring a dog but thought dat i will feed one out of dm and take away to hm...wd a normal wooden home made of ply ... i ws happy to feed him thinking that i m doing a great job to make him feed and giving him a good life but today after reading this article i m feeling very bad as i gt to knw dat i m d criminal as d dog was having a little allergy and i have given him a single tab of 10mg to d puppy yest due to a non understanding conversation with the docter, he was ok till yesterday night but when i have seen him in d morning it was something unexpected... he was totally laid and cannot move with legs ... moment i hv seen called d doctor and cleared dat i hv dn a mistake.... still had some hope ...gt hm treated but he didnt survived....really feeling very bad....family told never to think again in lyf for any pet....everybody was attached to him bt it left .....no words more cannt express my frustration on myself.....i m sorry for wt i did..its paining ....wl never do such a mistake in future sorry again

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