Polyneuropathy Average Cost

From 393 quotes ranging from $2,000 - 6,000

Average Cost

$4,000

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What is Polyneuropathy?

Polyneuropathy, meaning many abnormalities of the nervous system, is marked by clinical signs that include progressive weakness in the limbs, exercise intolerance, high-steppage, change in bark pitch and difficulty breathing. Sometimes called chronic relapsing polyneuropathy, the disorder is caused by damage to the fatty covering that encircles and protects nerve fibers. 

Neuropathy means a disease of, or damage to nerves. When it occurs outside of the brain or spinal cord, it is called a peripheral neuropathy. When particularized to dogs and cats, polyneuropathy is a collection of peripheral nerve disorders that are often breed-specific. Unlike mononeuropathy in which one nerve type is affected, polyneuropathy stipulates the involvement of three types of peripheral nerves -- sensory nerves, motor nerves, and autonomic nerves. Overall, any nerve damage interferes with the function of these peripheral nerves.  

It’s no wonder that canines with peripheral neuropathy often struggle to maintain balance, respiration, and other vital functions. Polyneuropathy in dogs often strikes without warning anywhere from ten to twenty months of age. Opposite to acute neuropathy, symptoms of chronic neuropathy begin slowly and increase over time.

Canine polyneuropathy is a neurological disease characterized by a dysfunction of peripheral nerves.

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Symptoms of Polyneuropathy in Dogs

Symptoms may be varied and inconsistent.

  • Change in gait
  • Loss of bark
  • Weakness in legs
  • Tremor
  • Lack of coordination
  • Resistance to standing and walking
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Atrophy
  • Loss of pain sensation leading to self-mutilation

Types

Two examples of peripheral neuropathies include Dancing Doberman disease and an idiopathic polyneuropathy associated with the Alaskan Malamute. Alaskan Malamutes are known to inherit diseases that progressively enervate their instinctual desire to hunt and work. Alaskan Malamute Polyneuropathy (AMPN) causes atrophy of the spinal muscle, a noticeable change in gait, as well as symmetric hind limb weakness. Significant changes may include an inability to walk up the stairs or jump.  While some partially recover, many Malamutes are euthanized due to a markedly decreased quality of life.  Dancing Doberman Disease (DDD) is another example of a breed-related, progressive peripheral neuropathy. This problem is relatively rare and only affects Doberman Pinschers. Soon after onset, the Doberman may begin to resist putting weight on both hind legs. A continual shifting behavior explains the dancing term. There appears to be no pain, but muscles in the unused legs may eventually lose sensation. Even with the progression toward muscle atrophy, dogs with DDD often live long, healthy lives.

Causes of Polyneuropathy in Dogs

The job of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), is to carry information from the central nervous system, the brain, and spinal cord, to the rest of the body. While sensory nerves relay messages about touch, smell and taste, motor nerves serve to help the brain control the muscles. Autonomic nerves are central to the body as they control heart rate, breathing and digestion. Nerve damage substantially impacts the communication between the PNS and the entire body.

Diagnosis of Polyneuropathy in Dogs

Diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy is difficult, and often requires a neurological examination, diagnostic tests such as ultrasound and chest x-rays, a muscle biopsy and electronic testing of nerve response and activity. Your veterinarian, or a veterinary neurologist, may also recommend blood testing and a spinal tap to check for various disorders. It will be important to test for conditions that may present in a similar manner such as a tumor or other neurological disease, in order to rule them out.

Treatment of Polyneuropathy in Dogs

Currently, there is no treatment for these conditions. Though top researchers and veterinary colleges have devoted decades to the study of canine polyneuropathy, there are still more questions than answers. Symptoms vary considerably from dog to dog, and in most cases, the onset of symptoms is sudden rather than progressive. While some dogs appear to grow out of it, others decline so sharply that they require euthanasia.

Recovery of Polyneuropathy in Dogs

Since the extent and nature of the disease varies so greatly from dog to dog, it is difficult to predict chances for recovery. Though your dog may suddenly appear to improve, he may present with new symptoms within a short period. No matter the course of the disease, your canine will never fully return to the state or condition pre-onset. Thus, it’s recommended to continually monitor symptoms and evaluate your pet’s quality of life.

It is also important to remove any affected dog from a breeding environment. Neutering your dog is advisable not only to prevent breeding, but also to lessen undue stress.

Polyneuropathy Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

A
Labrador Retriever
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Breathing Difficulty
Vomiting
Coughing

My beautiful 7 year old lab went in for a routine dental cleaning/tooth extraction about 8 weeks ago. Immediately after surgery, she was having trouble breathing, hacking and regurgitating. After a few weeks, my vet informed me she regurgitated during surgery and most likely had aspiration pneumonia. Which it turns out she did have, however she continued to have a hard time breathing. After a few more weeks we had an endoscopy that showed she now has bilateral laryngeal paralysis. Today she had surgery for that and unfortunately the vet tried several times to tie a suture to her cartilage and all failed. My vet mentioned polyneuropathy and also mentioned a vet in the area that may perform a laryngectomy. This has come on very suddenly and I'm having a hard time with what to do. Medical management or a possible laryngectomy. Any advice anyone has would be amazing.

Are you a member of the FB group called Laryngeal Paralysis Support Group? If not..you should join. There are so many that ask similar questions and it a very large helpful group.
Best to you

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Skeeter
Great Dane
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Shaking

Our 4 year old neutered, 150 lb Great Dane, Skeeter, has been diagnosed with Polyneuropathy and the Neurologist wants to do a muscle/nerve biospy surgery that will cost $3000 only to omit things it could be and in the end we will most likely still have our baby with untreatable neuropathy. When he was under 2 years old we had laryngeal paralysis surgery done to help his breathing. His breathing is still a bit labored especially with his daily walks, but he is doing good with that. The problem now is his hind legs; he has basically always done the "dancing" when he would eat or drink, but now he lifts and holds up his hind legs like they are in pain (mainly his back right leg) and he rolls his back paws especially the left back paw (it buckles). We give him two 325 mg aspirin twice a day which seems to help a bit. We are not sure if we should put Skeeter through this surgery, if we knew it would help him we would do it in a heartbeat. We are wondering if getting custom braces made for his hind legs might help. He truly still has puppy in him and enjoys bounding and loping around and playing with our other dogs. We are just wondering what the future holds.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I wish that I could give you definitive answers to your questions, but unfortunately nobody can tell the future, and the reason that we do testing it to try and find out what is going on so that we can treat it if possible. It would be worth having a frank conversation with the neurologist about the value of that test, and if they think that it is likely an untreatable neuropathy. If so, physical therapy may help to keep the muscles strong, but ultimately he will lose use of those legs, which is very sad in a 150 pound dog as options are limited. I hope that things go well for him.

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Neo
Saluki
14 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Hi there,my 14.5 year old Saluki male has started having an unsteady gait. At times he stands as if he can't decide to go forward or come back. This morning he came to me and lifted his left front leg. When I touched it it was vibrating and I could feel the muscle spasm in. He was very uncomfortable and couldn't walk so I carried him and gently massaged his shoulder and leg until the spasm stopped. He seems to be uncomfortable though but has now laid down and is resting. The leg lifting has happened before but I have not previously noticed the muscle spasm. It only seems to affect his front left leg.What can be the cause of this?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
There are various causes for localised muscle spasms especially as a cat gets older which may include injury, spinal disorders, poisoning, tumour, electrolyte imbalance among other causes; if Neo seems to be in pain, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to help determine an underlying cause and treatment (if appropriate). Without examining Neo, I cannot say what the underlying cause may be; but at his age you should have him checked over by your Veterinarian on a regular basis along with regular blood tests to catch conditions early. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hi, my 13 year old heeler/Kelpie mix was diagnosed with bi lateral laryngeal paralysis and has developed atrophy, muscle weakness, tremors and sporadic loss of function with pain in his left leg/hip area. I have noticed he will have sporadic tremors in his ears and muzzle as well now. How fast does neuropathy move and what should I be looking for to c ok me next? Some days he seems to be feeling better and somedays worse, his breathing is labored some days and he pants all the time. He is also drinking excessive amounts of water then will cough up water and or food. I am wondering how to tell when it is time and he is suffering too much, as you know heelers and kelpies are tough breeds and it can be hard to tell when it is too much as they will put on their game face and keep going, but I dont want him to suffer. :(

Great, but a Saluki is a dog, and one about as far from a cat as they come.

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Toby
Labrador Retriever
12 Years
Moderate condition
-1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Walking difficulty

My labrador had an episode of subacute change in bark followed by weakness of all 4 limbs (no involvement of neck and face) 5 years ago which responded to steroids which was tapered and stopped. He seems to have a recurrence now. How long and how much steroids should I use now.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
If Toby is presenting with the same symptoms as before, you should visit your Veterinarian for another examination to confirm the diagnosis and to prescribe the course of treatment; without examining Toby I cannot prescribe prescription medications. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hardly helpful!

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Morris
Labrador
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

buckling of hind legs, tremors

Hello, my grandoggie was just diagnosed with polyneuropathy. :( He had been choking on this food as of late and making gagging noises. Also, his bark has changed quite a bit. Not nearly as low and strong as it previously was. My daughter has taken him to a specialist to have surgery for the "lar par". If the surgery is a success can it extend his quality of life while dealing with polyneuropathy? We are hoping that if the fear of him choking on his food is lessened and his panting improves that he will be able to resume his 2nd favorite activity. His first love is food and then his walks. :) We would hate to think of Morris in pain or suffering due to this nasty disease.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Surgery to correct laryngeal paralysis should improve quality of life for Morris, but there are some possible complications of the surgery which may include loss of bark (seems to be an issue already), aspiration of food and water, failure of the surgery requiring another surgery among other issues. Whilst the surgery will improve breathing, it will not make any changes to the generalised polyneuropathy. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.acvs.org/small-animal/laryngeal-paralysis www.acvim.org/Portals/0/PDF/Animal%20Owner%20Fact%20Sheets/Neurology/Laryngeal%20Paralysis.pdf

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Sunny
chow/retriever
14 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

hind leg weakenss
Weakness
anxiety
Confusion
Incontinence

My dog Sunny was diagnosed with Atypical Cushings, Hypo-T, and Vestibular Syndrome with head tilt with nystagma around 2013. His vestibular event resolved, but then he had another after having his thyroid meds adjusted. The following year he was diagnosed with laryngeal paralysis. He underwent the tie-back procedure shortly afterwards and has done fine in the 4 years after. He still has a head tilt and leans to the right. Soon, his back legs started to go - seems to alternate. Within the past few months his front legs have gotten weaker and he has lost a lot of weight. He is starting to show signs of cognitive disorder as well - confusion and anxiousness especially at night. He had an MRI last year and no tumor or anything was found so they concluded he has peripheral/polyneuropathy. He wears a full body harness and although he can still rise on his own - sometimes it's hard and he can't stand for too long unless stand up against something. He has urinary and fecal incontinence so he wears a male wrap. He doesn't seem to get much joy out of life anymore. A sniff here, a look or ear prop up there. Do i have anything left to try for my guy? CCD meds? Or, will the neuropathy kill him or will the quality of life really be the deciding factor? Can i get him better?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It is obvious that you love Sunny. No matter how much we love our dogs, though, it is important to keep their quality of life in mind. Without examining him, or knowing more about him, it is impossible for me to comment on whether he is enjoying his life at this point. it would be best to have your veterinarian take a look at him, assess his general demeanor, and advise you as to whether there is anything more that you can do for this dog that you love so much. When he is not enjoying his life anymore, it is important, as his friend, to make the best choice for him. I wish you both the best.

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Grace
Yorkipoo
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

wont climb stairs
trouble walk
Polyneuropathy symptoms
Shaking
favors one side thus running into things

At what point do you decide to put your dog with Polyneuropathy down? All four of her legs are weak and she can barely walk when she first gets up, however she seems to do better after walking outside for a while. I worry leaving her alone during the day that she will get stuck with all four legs flayed out and not be able to get up. She doesn't seem to be in pain but from what I read pain receptors are inhibited with this disease. She is only 6 1/2 years old and this has seemed to come out of nowhere. The vet doesn't seem to have any suggestions on how to improve her quality of life.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

It is very difficult to describe how to make the decision to put a dog down; there are many variables, but if Grace cannot enjoy her life and is unable to carry out normal functions like walking, urinating and defecating then euthanasia needs to be considered. You need to see if Grace has a quality of life and if she has any joy left; it is a difficult decision, but it is yours. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Khloe is a 9 yr old chihuahua. Yesterday, she began to act strangely and distant. She wouldn't come to me and she is licking her lips all the time. She acts like she hears me but doesn't see me. She only drank a little water and ate a little food, but she wouldn't beg me for my food, which is really odd. She is quiet and doesn't whine, like when I'm leaving the house. She stares at space like she is following something that isn't there. The area around her eyes has darkened; she is white/blond. She runs to corners in any room, or under a table and sits with her back in the corner. So weird? I know Chihuahuas are diggers and she sometimes pretends to push invisible dirt in her food bowl, but she is using that same motor movement when she is called. She isn't wanting to go outside either. I thought maybe she licked a spot where I stayed a bug, but I'm not sure. She eats everything. Any suggestions?

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Ozzy
Labrador Retriever
13 Years
Moderate condition
2 found helpful
Moderate condition

My 13 yr old lab has progressing weakness and atrophy in both back legs. He slips at times and has trouble laying and sitting down. His gait is a bit off and sometimes he will drag a backleg for a sec (the left back leg seems to be worse than the right) as a puppy up until last year if anyone was in the pool he'd go nuts and run around the pool. A few times he had slipped and fallen but never showed signs of pain but a few years ago he started tripping when he'd go for walks but now it's worse and he's on two different mess for his pain. He also has anxiety and foggy alzheimers. What do you suggest could help in preventing further atrophy and weekends in his legs? Could water physio help? Do you think he has a neuropathy or could it be a compressed disc in his back causing this issue ? He does have a slipped or compressed disc in his back. He seems to like having his hips and back massaged which I do often. Any advice you can give. His tail always wags so he's happy but it's so heartbreaking watching him struggle to sit and lay down and when he falls or trips and then struggles to get back up.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It is very important to restrict Ozzy’s movements, do not allow him to run around like he used to; movement restriction is one if not the most important courses of treatment in cases like this, gentle and regular walks on a lead of a short duration (a block or two) may be beneficial too. It is important to have further x-rays taken with and without contrast (myelography) to determine the severity of any intervertebral disk disease. Hydrotherapy and other movements may help as may acupuncture, discussion with Physiotherapists and Acupuncturists may be of benefit. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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