Diabetes with Ketone Bodies Average Cost

From 12 quotes ranging from $300 - 4,500

Average Cost

$3,000

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What are Diabetes with Ketone Bodies?

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA.

Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal.

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Symptoms of Diabetes with Ketone Bodies in Dogs

Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below:

  • Change in appetite (either increase or decrease)
  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Mental dullness
  • Coughing
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Weight loss
  • Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident
  • Slow, deep respiration.
There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease.

Causes of Diabetes with Ketone Bodies in Dogs

While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA:

  • Fasting
  • Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerbates the illness because there is an inadequate amount of insulin being taken
  • Dehydration
  • Stress hormone levels increasing (i.e. cortisol and glucagon).

It is important to note that concurrent diseases are a factor in DKA as well. Studies show the most common coexisting illnesses are hyperadrenocorticism, bacterial urinary tract infection, and pancreatitis.

Diagnosis of Diabetes with Ketone Bodies in Dogs

Prompt and aggressive treatment is necessary for untreated cases of DKA due to the variety of complications that result from untreated cases. The veterinarian will use various methods to diagnose diabetes with ketones, starting with a complete history of findings as described by you. It is important to relay all symptoms and behavioral characteristics seen of late.

Whether your pet has already been diagnosed with diabetes will be an important consideration for the veterinarian as well. Checking for ketones involves a standard urinalysis. A urine culture is a relevant tool also because urinary tract infections are very common in patients who have DKA.

A thorough blood analysis is essential. The veterinarian will verify if there are reduced serum bicarbonate concentrations and elevated serum glucose concentrations, and check the serum kidney values, pancreatic enzyme measurements, and electrolyte levels. The measurements of venous carbon dioxide and blood gas elevation will be taken.

A liver function test is likely, as is a chest x-ray and an abdominal ultrasound. The veterinarian will listen for a heart murmur and unusual lung sounds. She may find skin abnormalities or cataracts, both common signs of DKA.

Treatment of Diabetes with Ketone Bodies in Dogs

The treatment of mild diabetes with ketone bodies will vary from the treatment of a severe case. Often, dogs who have a serious crisis as a result of the ketones will be very ill, and in many instances near death.

A dog who appears healthy or has minimal symptoms can present with high serum glucose and ketones in the urine. Often, the treatment for mild DKA is regular insulin therapy in the form of injections of short-acting insulin to get the serum glucose levels back in order. This may take a few days, but the prognosis is good.

When treating severe DKA, veterinarians must take a more aggressive approach. Of utmost importance is diagnosing and treating any underlying cause that may be adding to the crisis. Dogs in an emergency situation will be hospitalized, generally for a period of five to six days. Aggressive treatment will commence with intravenous fluids, which have been shown to bring rapid improvement to the condition of dogs suffering from DKA. Balancing the electrolyte levels is the second, very important step. Phosphate and potassium supplements are given. The veterinarian may choose to give bicarbonate to correct acid based upset.

Glucose levels will be adjusted gradually. Regular crystalline insulin, which is the shortest acting form, will be given either by injection or intravenously. Administration by intravenous is the chosen method for canines in critical condition. The blood glucose will be measured every two to four hours at treatment onset. The veterinarian will monitor your pet carefully because complications like hypoglycemia, brain swelling, and anemia can occur. Once your dog is stabilized, a longer acting insulin will be given.

Antibiotics may be given to treat infection, even if not yet identified. Drugs may be given to encourage urine volume, with a catheter inserted in order to track more easily urine production. Vital signs will be carefully audited, and often an electrocardiogram is done.

Recovery of Diabetes with Ketone Bodies in Dogs

The prognosis for DKA is good, but, of course, depends on if an underlying disease is present and can be treated successfully. It has been reported that many dogs hospitalized with this condition will be able to go home and enjoy a productive life. It must be noted that 70% of dogs have been known to have a recurrence. Therefore, watching for signs of trouble must be part of your pet care regimen. Checking of insulin levels, and communication with your veterinarian on a regular basis will be advised. Your dog should be on a low-fat diet, with high levels of fiber and complex carbohydrates.

Diabetes with Ketone Bodies Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Oliver
Dachsund Beagle mix
10 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Trace ketones in bloodwork

Medication Used

.1 mg levothyroxine twice a day
Novolin-N 5 units every 12 hours

I got Oliver 2 years ago. He was already diagnosed with diabetes. He's a strange case though. His blood sugar has always been high. Even with novolin n insulin every 12 hours, his curve starts at 500, scoops down to 150-200 at the 6 hour mark and moves back up to 500. It was far worse before we got his hypothyroidism treated if you can believe it. Even when he was over 600 BG for a month or two while tests were being done, he never showed ketones in his urine. At his 12 hour curve on this past Friday though, his numbers started at 510 and were done every two hours 399,447,139,313,581,587. His urinalysis that day also showed trace ketones. I used my keto-diastix urine strips yesterday to verify and the shade of the testing area never went above trace either. I also looked back at his history and in late 2016 trace ketones were detected and I was never even told. He has had two clean urine tests since then. His urinalysis in late 2017 had no ketones either. His complete blood panel also done on Friday shows no abnormalities, he has no urinary infections--high BG and cholesterol are the only stand outs beyond the trace ketones. The vet is now saying if he has trace ketones in a week, I need to do x-rays and ultrasounds. It's making me panic. What would those tests be done to show? Are trace ketones always a sign of impending definite KDA? If he has a weird curve where his numbers are high at points and he can only eat every 12 hours with his insulin--fasting can trigger ketones--is there really a way to avoid having at least small traces of ketones at all times?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1048 Recommendations
If Oliver has trace ketones in his urine, that does indicate that his body is in a ketotic state, and his diabetes is not well controlled. I'm not sure what your veterinarian is looking for with the x-ray, but an ultrasound of his pancreas to see if there are any larger problems going on would be a good idea, since his diabetes is so hard to control. He may respond better to a different insulin, and that might be something to discuss with your veterinarian if it hasn't already been considered. I hope that everything goes well for him, you sound like you are doing a great job taking care of him.

Thank you. I appreciate knowing why the ultrasound would be important. As mentioned, Oliver has had trace ketones once before in late 2016--when I wasn't told and thus did nothing--and his body must have righted itself. So does trace ketones usually or mostly lead to KDA though? Finally two thoughts I want to run by you. 1) Oliver's rescue did a bunch of tests and changed his food in September 2017--it is now only 26% carbs. Considering that he's had BG in the 600s without showing ketones in urine, could he simply need to go back to a higher carb food with more insulin? 2) Could only getting food with insulin every 12 hours be triggering his body into a fasting state, thus producing the ketones? I appreciate you!!

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Pearl
Labrador Retriever
13 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Acidketosis

Just two days ago I had to make the choice to give my dog a peaceful sendoff. She was 13 yr old lab named pearl.Her symptoms of Dka showed up a week ago. IIt hit her hard. I wish I would have brought her in that day. I'm devastated! ! She was family. Never knew she had diabetes. I keep questioning myself would she be here if I brought her sooner.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations
It can be difficult for pet owners to decide when the best time to get veterinary advice is since many times pets have good days most of the time with the odd off day, also some pets may be sick but after a car journey to the clinic their firing on all symptoms. However, with diabetic ketoacidosis, the earlier treatment begins the better since it is important to get the glucose under control; whether or not it would have changed the outcome I cannot say. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Winston
Cockapoo
8 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Increased Urination
Breathing Difficulties
Fruity Breath
Frequent Urination

I have a 8 year old cockapoo. He has lately had excessive thirst and been needing to go to the bathroom constantly. Over the past week or so he started to have accidents in the house. He has never had an accident. His urine is thick, syrupy and sticky. A month ago he had been diagnosed with struvite crystals in his bladder and urethra but with changing his food to the vet approved food and pain meds, the crystals in the urethra passed. I had initially chalked some of these changes to the new food and feeling better, such as drinking more and going to the bathroom more but obviously things changed with further development.

I contacted the vet on Friday and took in a Irvine sample in the afternoon, which they informed me tested very high for glucose and they could not confirm without examining him but thought he had diabetes. Fiy- he weighs 15 lbs. they told me to bring him in Monday. Knowing that he wakes us 3-4 times a night for more water or to go to the bathroom. And told me that it’s very expensive and time consuming to care for a diabetic dog. And that I would want to consider that.

As the weekend has progressed he now has a very strong odor to him. It’s sweet fruity, slightly off.

Is this possibly Keto?

Are all dogs usually hospitalized when first diagnosed? If keto, how concerning is it that he’s not seen until Monday? If he isn’t, what should we watch for?

Thank you for your assistance.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1048 Recommendations
Diabetic dogs can quickly become ketoacidotic as their body tissues digest themselves as an energy source. Diabetes is not a disease to put off and treat later, and if he has become ketotic, he will need to be hospitalized until he is stable. I would not wait until Monday, but would find an open 24 hour clinic near you tonight or tomorrow to start therapy. I hope that he is okay.

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GizzieLee
Dachshund
11 Years
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

My dachshund started with a cough and vomiting. Put her on cough syrup, she got worse and I took her in, they said it was asthma and would let me know about medicine. She was truly sick all night, we were at the vets waiting for it to open next morning after asthma diagnosis. Once they diagnosed DKA how long of a delay until the first insulin is given? They refused any medication until I went to bank, I had 300 on me but they wanted 400. I figured out the money without leaving the office still they gave her no insulin. They kept her there and now I have no dog. If she had quicker insulin is there a possibility of her being alive now? How much of delay is normal for first insulin dose on newly diagnosed diabetes and DKA? Her glucose was over 575. Thank you for any help you can provide.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations
There is no real acceptable delay, when blood glucose is elevated action should be taken to bring it down to a reasonable level; however there may be some other rationale for delaying treatment which I don’t know about. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a severe condition and it is difficult to determine whether treatment would have been effective if given at the time of diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you so much, I feel a little better. The reason for the delay is because they wanted a deposit on the coming hospital stay of 400, I had 300 on me, not enough to give her insulin I guess. I appreciate your answer, I have almost worn google out searching but have no medical background. Her urn comes home today, maybe I can handle it better when shes home.

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Sam
Rottweiler
5 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Always hungry still losing weight

Medication Used

Reli-on novolin n every 12 hr

Rottweiler age 5 male diagnosed dka around 70 days ago dropped 30-35 pounds. Always hungry still losing weight. On reli-on novolin n 15 units every 12 hours. Feeding is 2 1/4 cups eukanuba adult large breed. What would be the recommendation? Thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations
The problem with diabetic ketoacidosis or diabetes in general is that each dog is different and you cannot use exactly what works with one dog with another; it is important to get the blood glucose levels down using insulin and you should be taking regular blood glucose measurements and noting when Sam is fed to try and find an ideal balance. Dietary management is also important and you should have Sam on a diabetic diet, all this should have been gone through with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Egypt
Pit bull
5 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Throwing up.weak.breathing heav
Throwing up weak breathing heav

Hi how are you, unfortunately my dog was diagnose with diabetes and found ketones 4 days ago, we had to take her to emergency hospital where she was hospitalized did iv on her found that her sugar levels were in the 700 now their at 300. She is eating not throwing up my question is should I get her neuter after she just went through a small trama and her age, I know they won’t balance her sugar levels without her being neuter but can’t she wait, I’m scared if I they put under it might be bad what do you think ?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations
For now it is important to keep Egypt’s blood glucose as low as possible and keep it controlled; any decision to spay her would be down to your Veterinarian if they are happy to anaesthetise her with her blood results. Dietary management is important and you should also discuss this with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you for all you expertise. Sam is a male. I honestly don't even know the glucose range he should be in. Or how to keep the ketone level down.

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Snickers
Mixed
9.5 years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Fatigue
Weight Loss
Polyuria
Polydipsia

My dog was diagnosed with dka with a sugar in the 300's. we were told he needed to be hospitalized. After 24 hrs of treatment, we were told to take him home and bring him back daily for treatment, as his separation anxiety was so severe, it was making his sugar worse. It was 450 after the first day of treatment. I asked the vet how aggressively they were treating him, as taking him home would mean no blood sugar monitoring or insulin administration for at least 12 hrs. The vet was very lax and didn't seem concerned, but I am. He is still voiding every hour and still drinking a ton of water. I believe they only gave one dose of regular insulin in that first day of treatment. Are they not being aggressive enough? Shouldn't they sedate him to ensure he is being treated in a timely manner??

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations

There are many different treatment regimes for treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis; a treatment regime in a popular textbook calls for insulin to be administered hourly until the blood glucose level reaches below 250mg/dL, where the frequency is reduced to every four to six hours. Sedation is not advisable in cases of Diabetic Ketoacidosis and usually the high blood glucose is treated before the administration of sedation or anaesthesia. Whilst it can be traumatic for Snickers to be in the Veterinary Clinic during treatment, it is in his best interest to get his glucose levels down to a safe level. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I wastolf that my Jack Russell was in distress and needed to be put down. I was crushed. I should have waited, now I am so depressed without my little Bella. I just didn't want her to suffer.

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Tigger
Jack Russell Terrier
15
Mild condition
2 found helpful
Mild condition

Medication Used

Vetoryl

Hi my beloved male Jack Russell was 15 years old. He had 7 years of cushings disease on vetoryl and been doing extremely well through his life. When he reached 13 or 14 he was going blind, deaf, got a heart murmur, bad arthritis week bones in his back legs. He had kidney problems but he was on special diet KD hills dog food. He had a blood test in July and everything came back ok. One month later. He suddenly went down within 2 weeks and I told my vet that he was drinking lots of water and urinating on the floor. My vet thought it might be the kidney disease so she gave antibiotics. He wasn't going out has much often when he was on antibiotics, but still drinking the water. I thought may be he was flushing the infection in his urine out. After a week I wasn't happy so i took him to have a blood test to see whats going on. It was devastating news and turned out to be Diabetic ketoacidosis. My vet didn't get this right unfortunately. So within a week my dog was seriously ill. My vet put him on IV fluids and trying to get his levels down but she told me the out look doesn't look good because controlling it with the cushings will be extremely difficult. The best thing would be to put him to sleep. My dog has had a rough time but been the best dog you could ask for and he was very much loved. I had to put him to sleep. I would appreciate your advice have I done the right thing? I keep thinking if only i caught this earlier could something been done. I don`t blame my vet but sometimes i blame myself for not acting quickly. If I acted quickly could I have saved my dog? or if the vet did pick it up earlier enough would this made difference? I was thinking the quality of life my dog had towards the end wasn't looking good. I couldn't put him through anymore with all his other problems. God bless love you Tigger sleep tight little man. You always be in my heartxxxxxxxxx I appreciate your advice what would you have done?

Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/condition/diabetes-ketone-bodies

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations
It is normal to ask questions and to second guess yourself after the passing of a loved one, especially when you believe that earlier intervention may have resulted in a different outcome. The increase in thirst could have been attributable to the Cushing’s Disease being troublesome, a urinary tract infection or other condition; without performing urinalysis or a blood test there would be very little evidence to base a different diagnosis on (I didn’t examine Tigger so I can only speak generally). It is true that given Tigger’s age and preexisting conditions would have made stabilization difficult and the overall prognosis would have been poor; based on your question, you took the best course of action in Tigger’s interest. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Snickers
Mixed
9.5
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Fatigue
Polydipsia
Polyuria

Medication Used

Humulin R insulin

My dog was just diagnosed with dka and diabetes. After 4 days of hospitalization with IV fluids and multiple doses of regular insulin, his sugar was reading in the 80-90's in the hospital (according to the vet). He was sent home with a small amount of ketones still in his system. We were given a regimen of regular insulin, 7 units in am and 4 units in pm. My dog is about 35 lbs now. The vet did tell me he has only seen about 2 cases of dka such as my dogs case. After being discharged last night, his blood sugar this morning was HI meaning >750. I gave him his 7 units and rechecked his sugar at 2pm. The sugar is still HI. I know the vet said his sugar may fluctuate for a few days but I'm sure it should not be this high. Does my vet know what he's doing? Should I go to another vet? What should I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations

I am happy to read that Snickers was four days hospitalised for treatment as you had previously written to me that due to separation anxiety you didn’t want to leave in there. A blood glucose level of 750mg/dL is too high and may lead to coma and death, I would recommend that you keep monitoring the blood glucose level (as they may fluctuate, especially after meals) and ensure that Snickers isn’t presenting any new symptoms like vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain or lethargy. If the glucose level doesn’t decrease, return to your Veterinarian or Emergency Veterinarian to get Snickers stabilised. As I wrote previously diabetic ketoacidosis has many different treatment regimes and finding a suitable one for Snickers may take time. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My dog has diabetes for about 5 month now . I give him his inslun from the first day. Baked sweet potatoes and sirloin . He was doing great and sugar was awsome. I started working more because I opened a cleaning business and I started to give him dog food and his sugar went crazy and I am now trying diabetic dog food. The thing is to make sure that they only eat twice a day with there insulin shot. I never leave my dog alone so I don't know if other factors play into your dog's sickness but I would try home cooked meals if this diabetic dog food does not work I'll be going back to cooking home cooked meals for him..

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Nicholas
Maltipoo
5 Years
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Lathargic, Not eating, Heavy Drinking, Urinating.

My Nicholas died of DKA induced by diabetes mellitus about three months ago. I was just really confused because I thought he was getting better when they told me his glucose was coming down to healthy level and he was perking up. Then, the next day they said there was nothing else they could do for him and we had to euthanize him. I was just wondering what possible effects due to DKA would cause my dog irreparable damage to the point where we had to put him down even though his glucose level was under control at that point?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes where the body cannot use the glucose in blood circulation due to a lack of insulin and the body turns to fat as a source of energy; this method of creating energy has waste products (ketones) which accumulate in the body and in some cases cause oedema on the brain. Management of glucose levels, potassium and electrolytes is important in managing diabetic ketoacidosis; many times a patient may be stabilised, but complications may occur. I cannot say why your Veterinarian recommended euthanasia, but there may have been another concurrent condition which complicated the diabetic ketoacidosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

somewhat helpful toto is a kerin terrior pug mixed 3 weeks ago diagnosed with diabetes her ketone levels were too high to count started her on a diabetic food and insulin 2x's a day she did not take to the food and went to boiled chicken and eggs she did well with the insulin yesterday vomited her food and couldn't keep water down today back to the vet where I was told hospital bill would run in the thousands and a payment plan of $200 a week was not acceptable they gave her 2 injections one an antibiotic and the other was something to settle her stomach they sent her home and told me she would not make it thru the weekend she is 8 years old and we have always used the same vet have never not paid her and the bills from earlier this year were well over
$1000 I know I am just upset right now but sometimes it is better to just be truthful right up front this hurts more then you know I am so sorry for your loss

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Mizzy
Shih Tzu
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lathargic, Not eating, Heavy Drinking, Urinating.
Lathargic

Hello, I have a 11lb. shih tzu that is currently being treated for DKA, Ketoacidosis. We have been taking her to her regular Pet Hospital, but her dr. is way for the week. The covering dr.s are treating her and i have concerns and can use the advise. When we brought her in two days ago she was lathargic, not eating, drinking a lot of water etc.. They tested her glucose and it was at 550. This was late and they close, so we brought back in the following morning and they start IV fluids all day and dr. on staff checker her BG level at it was over 500. He administered insulin and by the end of the day her BG was slightly over 200. The Dr. was happy and stated our primary concern right now it to ensure she gets the fluid she needs via IV and regulate her BG levels. Today we brought her back this morning for another day of fluids. They took her BG Levels this AM and it was over 600, but was taken shortly after 4 Units of insulin was administered at home prior to returnning to the vet. SO, they checked 2 hours later and it went down to 400 and that was late morning. They checked again 3 hours later and the BG went back up to 550. I was told by the other Dr. that we need to get her BG levels regulated if we are to make progress. I am told by this Dr. that they have not administered any Insulin today even though her levels are very high and that i can give her insulin at home after her meal, which will be 5 hours after her last BG test of 550. My concern is shouldnt the Vet be more aggressively treating the high BG levels as opposed to just me giving her insulin with her meals in the AM and Evening? By keeping her at these high BG levels all day does that not result in the body continuing to produce Ketones and not improve her condition?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations

Treatment of diabetes with ketoacidosis is a fine balance between getting the blood glucose level down; but not to let it drop, but let it come down over time. In cases of ketoacidosis, fluid therapy is required along with an insulin regimen and blood glucose monitoring; generally an initial dose of 0.2U/kg of insulin is given followed by hourly doses of 0.1U/kg until the blood glucose is between 200-250mg/dL, then the dosage changes to 0.25-0.5U/kg every four to six hours. During the initial aggressive treatment hourly blood glucose readings should be taken and if there is a sudden drop in blood glucose, this should be corrected to make a nice smooth reduction in overall blood glucose. There are different treatment protocols for ketoacidosis so I don’t know which one your Veterinarian is following. Blood glucose will spike after meals, but should come down with a correctly dosed insulin regimen. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Snickers
Mixed
9.5
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Fatigue
Polydipsia
Polyuria

Medication Used

Humulin R insulin

After being hospitalized, Snickers' prescription has been humulin R 7 units in morning and 4 units in pm. According to the vet, his sugars were running in the 80-90's while hospitalized. He has been home since Thursday night, 10/27 and his readings have been >750 and then 643. The most recent reading was this am, after not eating for 12 hrs and was 643. He is not exhibiting any new symptoms, only polyuria, polydipsia, fatigue, and weight loss. Should I wait a few days to see if his sugar continues to go down or should I take him to the vet? I plan on going to a new vet, if anything, as I really don't believe the vet I took him to fully knew what they were doing and/or do not have much experience with dogs with dka. Any advice on what I should do now is greatly appreciated.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations

With the persistent high glucose level, I would recommend visiting a Veterinarian (yours or another) to review the insulin dosage and progress. Remember that diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes mellitus and that all dogs may react differently to treatment and that fine tuning of therapy with regular review is important. As I mentioned in my first answer to you, there are many different dosage regimens which may be used for diabetic ketoacidosis, however not all will work for all dogs and adjustments should be made where necessary by your Veterinarian; whether you choose to visit another Veterinarian is your decision. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Also you can not drop a dog sugar from 750 to normal in a day my dogs sugar was 303 and it took us about a few weeks till it went down with checking his blood sugar all the time and I started at 3 unit and my dog is 26 pounds. When I gave him dog food his sugar went up to 606 this past week . No more of that dog food again. Sometimes it is what food your given them. Make sure it has no kane sugar, molasses, no corn syrup ECT but believe me its hard to find a dog food without this stuff.

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