Hernia Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $700 - 2,500

Average Cost

$1,600

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What is Hernia?

A hernia is an abnormal opening in a muscle in which other tissues can pass through to reach other body parts. In dogs, hernias are usually found near the "belly button" area, the groin area near the rear legs or the chest/diaphragm area. In over 90 percent of medical cases, hernias are due to genetics and very rarely the result of trauma or pressure. The only exception to this is hiatal hernias.In most cases, veterinarians treat hernias in puppies less than 1-year-old due to inherited traits. Conversely, hernias can be the result of significant trauma at any age. If you notice swelling in the groin area or serious vomiting, consult a veterinarian immediately. Do not take a wait and see approach when swelling or frequent vomiting is occurring.

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Symptoms of Hernia in Dogs

Pet owners will usually notice signs of hernias in their dogs due to:

  • Food and/or water vomiting
  • Loss of appetite (although water may still be attractive to them)

Physical signs include:

  • Cramping
  • Fever
  • Leg numbness
  • Lethargy
  • Swelling (noticeable when the dog barks, cries, stands or strains)

In the worst case scenarios, a dog may die if bacterial toxins are able to make their way into a dog's body after tissues break down. This could happen as quickly as 24 to 48 hours if the dog is not treated immediately.

Types

Hernias in dogs are usually one of three:

  • Diaphragmatic hernia (liver or stomach pass through diaphragm opening to chest cavity and move into the area of the lungs)
  • Hiatal (stomach contents pass through diaphragm, and esophagus moves to stomach)
  • Inguinal hernia (groin area on the inner area of one of the rear legs)
  • Perineal hernia (abdominal contents pass from a pelvis tear to the anus)
  • Umbilical hernia (belly button area where a puppy was once connected to its mother). Abdominal organs (intestines or fat) travel through a muscle opening underneath the skin.

Causes of Hernia in Dogs

Unfortunately for some dogs, genetics play a large part (over 90 percent) in the reasons that they develop hernias. Veterinarians may suggest to pet owners to spay or neuter dogs immediately to avoid hernias traveling on to a potential set of puppies. Even dogs who have had a surgical repair on their own hernias are generally shied away from breeding again.

Diagnosis of Hernia in Dogs

The veterinarian will first inquire about whether the dog has already been spayed or neutered. If not, this will be recommended in addition to finding out the area where the hernia is located via X-rays.

Contrast studies, which are completed orally or by needle injection, confirm the diagnosis before proceeding with treatment. The contrast study will highlight where the hernia is on X-ray film or digitally, depending on available equipment. Considering hernias consist of tissue moving into the wrong place; veterinarians will be on the lookout for what doesn’t look quite right in certain regions of the body.

The veterinarian will also look for any signs of respiratory or abdominal disorders, as well as hard or painful bulges. Because those hard bulges could lead to fatalities if bacteria is able to travel through the muscle tissue, those areas will be focused on immediately before moving onto any other possible hernia areas.

Treatment of Hernia in Dogs

Spaying or neutering a dog is the first procedure for pre-treatment. In the case that it’s too late for either procedure, if the hernia is reducible, then it can simply be pushed back into its correct area (example: abdominal wall). Oral antacid preparation, along with medical treatment, may also be used to treat hernias in nonlife-threatening cases. In both cases, the earlier a hernia can be detected, the higher likelihood that this can be done.

Nonreducible hernias are linked to incidents where body tissue may have grown together due to swelling or blocked in so much that it cannot easily be pushed back. If the hernia has escalated to a strangulated hernia, when blood supply is lost, surgery is a mandatory procedure. Surgery is also necessary to prevent tissue from attaching itself to other organs.

Male dogs may have the upper hand on inguinal hernias near the rear legs. Sometimes small inguinal hernias will close without medical attention, including with male pups. With female dogs, especially ones who are pregnant, this is not usually the case, and medical attention will be needed.

In the case of a hiatal hernia combined with pneumonia, it is imperative that pet owners follow antibiotic prescription instructions from veterinarians, along with any dietary needs.

Recovery of Hernia in Dogs

In the case of a hiatal hernia, pet owners may have to feed a dog more frequently than normal due to slower digestion. Eventually, the dog should heal as usual, but times may vary.

As long as the surgery is successful, the dog should be able to go back to a healthy lifestyle. However, due to genetics, veterinarians will more often than not strongly recommend that the dog be spayed or neutered to avoid potential puppies having the same hernia problem as the parents.

Like other genetic disorders, there is currently no medical way to stop a genetic disorder that can easily be transmitted to offspring. If a pregnant female dog's hernia is found, the puppies and the mother should all be spayed or neutered as soon as possible to prevent the disorder from continuing to spread.

Hernia Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Shitzu
Shih Tzu
13
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Pain
Lethargy

Shitzu 13 hernia became enlarged showed evidence of pain and being lethargic. Vet took x rays and ultrasound said she had nodule on spleen and fat on intestines not sure if malignant or benign. Should take spleen out and perform surgery on hernia. No surgery 4 days later hernia soft reduced in size dog back to normal. Your comment.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Even though the hernia reduced in size and that your dog is back to normal, the main problem is the splenic mass. Masses on the spleen are difficult to diagnose and are usually only positively diagnosed after removal. The treatment of choice is splenectomy (removal of the spleen); however, at thirteen years of age blood tests will determine overall health for the general anaesthetic. Up to 40% of splenic masses are hematomas (accumulation of blood) or benign growth of tissue; however, hemangiosarcoma is a common malignant tumour in older dogs which spreads quickly, removal slows progression of the condition. I would recommend the splenectomy so that the masses are removed and positively identified. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My 2 months old puppy has hernia on the right side of its belly but i can afford a surgery its swelling im worried. Will it heal on its own?

My 13 year old Beagle has had a hard lump for many months. He eats fine, is in no obvious pain and still runs around. The cost is a major concern and we can't afford it. If he shows no adverse symptoms then can he just live out his life with it?

I have an 8 week old shitzu pup and she has a lump in the middle of her chest area. Could this be a hernia and what do you recommend?

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buddy
terrier
10 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

None

My dad's 10 yr old obese terrier mix has an inguinal hernia diagnosed by a vet. He has gotten fatter and then hernia has gotten bigger. He has no pain, no fever, no symptoms at all, but I would like for it to not get bigger, but we don't want to do surgery because of his age. Can we bind it like we do for humans? If so, is there a brand you recommend?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Whilst binding is common in humans, in dogs we prefer either to go a surgical route or a management route; management may include weight loss (I will put emphasis on weight loss), easily digestible food, stool softeners (to reduce straining and intra abdominal pressure) and movement restriction. Some people bandage the hernias using various techniques but with varying success due to body positioning. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My dog just done an umbilical hernia surgery 6 months ago. Now he has to do another surgery to repair his inguinal hernia. How safe is it to do another surgery in the same year (hes almost 11 years)?

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brutus
Rottweiler
2.5
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

the soft place has swollen up and have become hard

Medication Used

None

I have a rottweiler 2.5 year old the place where his belly button is the soft place has swollen up and have become hard. What is the cause?
And remedy for this.
Plz give your valuable feedback.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

It sounds like an umbilical hernia, which are usually not so serious unless abdominal content gets stuck inside the opening leading to occlusion, restriction of blood flow and death in extreme cases. Correction is by surgery where the protruding content is placed back into the abdomen and the opening is closed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Is there any natural way to cure this

My dog just done an umbilical hernia surgery 6 months ago. Now he has to do another surgery to repair his inguinal hernia. How safe is it to do another surgery in the same year (hes almost 11 years)? and could he have another hernia remember this is a second time? thank you.

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Sheyla
Poodle
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Swelling

My dog, teacup poodle, 10 years old, has recently developed a hernia. It's hard, can't be pushed back in and is starting to turn purple. She's also lactating, but not pregnant, with one nipple seemingly infected. I'm not sure if the hernia needs surgery and/or if the infected nipple has any relation to the hernia. She doesn't seem to show any symptoms of pain or discomfort and is still happy, hyper and cuddling whenever she can.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

In a case like this I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian to examine the “hernia” to make sure if it is a hernia or is a growth in her umbilical area (I am assuming the umbilicus is the area of the “hernia”), if it is starting to turn purple it may be occluding the blood supply. Pseudopregnancy is common and may be caused by a variety of hormonal issues; the infected nipple would need antibiotics, again your Veterinarian would be able to prescribe the antibiotics for you. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Puppy
Yorkshire Terrier
8 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Nose bleed

I have an 8 week old puppy my vet said has a or may have a scrotal/ininguinal hernia and because him being so tiny and small still may possibly be why nothing had dropped etc she said that once he comes in for his 12 wk shots the vet who looks at him will know if he needs surgery or not and he can get it done when he gets neutered. My question is is there an additional charge for the hernia surgery when done with a neutering or just an extra fee involved or are you only charged for the neutering as long as there aren't any issues or complications? From what I was told it seemed like a pretty simple standard thing but I wondered how it worked and how expensive it would be seeing ad I'm selling my pups and the buyer wants to know so she can decide whether or not she wants to still buy the dog. Thanks for any info, they are Yorkshire terriers BTW.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Hernia surgery is usually simple and straight forward and usually doesn’t add any significant time to a neutering procedure. The decision to charge for the hernia surgery in addition to the neutering would be at your Veterinarians discretion. Personally, I don’t see a reason to charge for a correction of a hernia (as long as there is no complications such as strangulation etc…) during neutering since the dog is already anaesthetised and you’re just adding a small procedure on top of the neutering; again each Veterinarian may have their own views and I cannot speak for other Veterinarians in their private practice. I would call your Veterinarian to ask his opinion on charging for the hernia portion of surgery, if there is a charge it may be a small addition to the neutering since the cost of the anaesthesia would be borne by the neutering. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a5or 6 year old shitzu And he's had a hernia I never to him to vet cuz he didn't show signs of pain or anything but it has grown today and I'm freaking out he's not showing signs of pain should I take him I'm so scared to take him and them give me bad news what do y'all think

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Daisy
Chihuahua
10 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lump

Will my dog be ok going for surgery given her age. Please I need advice. I am nearly sure she has a inguinal hernia on her right inner leg. She is in no pain or discomfort that I know of but I would but really like to get to the bottom of it and get it taken care of. She is 11 years old in 2 months and it would just put my mind at ease if I knew she would be able to undergo successful surgery given her age. Please I need advice as I'm really worried.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Whilst surgery in dogs over seven have an increased risk of complications, perioperative management of these cases usually leads to a more favourable prognosis; your Veterinarian will take blood tests to determine liver and kidney function as well as blood counts for red blood cells and platelets, couple this with improved anaesthetic products and better knowledge of anaesthesia usually results in a negligible risk. Unless there was severe results on the blood test or something questionable during physical examination, there really isn’t much to worry about. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Swift
Belgian Shepherd
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lump

Hello, my 3yr old Malinois bitch has developed a lump on her stomach (1-11/2 in), she has been spayed already.Her mood or character has not changed. Could this be a hernia? What is the treatment for it, and if she has to have surgery, how soon after can she travel? as we are moving house in a few weeks

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Without examining Swift I can give a few possibilities (not an exhaustive list) of conditions, including: hernia (usually centre of the stomach near the umbilicus or previous surgical scar), mammary tumour (breast tumour, uncommon in young spayed females but possible), tumour of the skin or lipoma (fatty tumour from the fat layer of the skin). Depending on the primary condition, the operation may be quite simple with Swift being fit to travel in a relatively short period of time (two to three weeks), obviously the fit to travel will depend on the type of surgery and aftercare required, the method of transportation and the distance or time of transport. Your Veterinarian will be able to discuss the options with you at the time of diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sherman
Shih Tzu
10 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My Shih Tzu is 10 years old and had an inguinal hernia removed before I got him at age 13 weeks (done while they neutered him). He has often had issues with eating in the morning, refusing food and at times he will vomit a couple hours after eating. Does that seem related to this hernia? He's had blood work for other things that came back normal and has a 5/6 murmur but has had no signs of CHF. He's not currently on any meds. He coughs after vomiting which I assume is from the burning acid going up his throat.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Lack of appetite and vomiting are among some of the symptoms of inguinal hernia along with other symptoms (see link below); whilst they are symptoms of inguinal hernia, unless the hernia has reappeared after ten years, they probably are indicative of numerous other conditions like foreign bodies, tumours, food intolerance, poisoning, infections or systemic disease. Given Sherman’s age, I would get your Veterinarian to examine him again to try to determine a diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
https://www.vetary.com/dog/condition/inguinal-hernia

My 10 year old (11 in september) Chihuahua has a inguinal hernia and I just wanted to know if she would be able to undergo surgery successfully given her age?

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Penelope
Great dane
16 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia

I have a Great Dane mix. She was spayed about a week and a half ago. She is 16 weeks old. She had developed a small protrusion on her belly, which seems to resemble what is described as a hernia. It is only about the size of a nickel in diameter. It's this normal after being spayed? I can't say that it ha caused her to act any different, but she has always been a very calm and lethargic dog. What's your advice with this. Should this heal up on its own? Or do I need to be concerned?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Whilst dogs may be spayed after eight weeks of age, most Veterinarians spay after six months of age (after first heat cycle). The hernia may be due to a damaged suture or may be coming from the umbilicus; check with the Veterinarian who performed the spay during a post operative check up to determine the location and cause of the hernia. If the hernia is umbilical, it may resolve itself before Penelope reaches six months of age. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bessie
Pekingese
9 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None yet

Medication Used

none

I just took my 9 month old pekingese to get spayed today.When I went to pick her up the vet told me that she now has a hernia and she w ill need surgery .The bump is right over the top of the stitches.there was nothing there when I brought her in.I feel the vet did something wrong and now wants me to pay for an expensive surgery due to his mistake.What do you think?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
That does sound unusual, and I'm not sure what is happening with the hernia. If she had an umbilical hernia, we typically repair those at the time of the spay. Since I can't see the hernia and don't know anything about the procedure, I can't say for sure, but it may be a good idea to get a second opinion, or to ask your veterinarian for more clarification.

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Ty
German Shepherd
2-2.5 years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

We rescued a Rottweiler/German Shepperd mix about a year ago. the best guess on the age is about 2 years old, which fits his personality. He's currently about 110 lbs and extremely active. Sprinting around the house, wrestling with me and the other dog, etc. He has no issues with appetite or lethargy for sure.

I noticed a small bump over where his belly button would be, which leads me to guess it is an Umbilical Hernia, maybe about 1 inch wide and 2 inches long. Unfortunately, the shelter from whom we bought him did not fix this or tell us about this last year. Should we be concerned with this? We are probably going to need to return to the vet for our other dog in the next week or 2, and we will bring him as well, but I just wanted to ask if you think we should be worried about this for the time being?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Umbilical hernias are common in dogs and are usually not an issue in most cases; usually they are congenital in origin and either spontaneously resolves themselves within the first six months of life or is corrected during neutering. Umbilical hernias usually consist of fat from the abdomen protruding through the umbilicus (belly button) and usually don’t cause alarm unless abdominal content (i.e. intestines) pass through and become strangulated which becomes a medical emergency. It is always worth getting your Veterinarian to check to ensure it is OK and the decision to operate would be at their discretion. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Remi
Black Labrador
8 Weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

No appetite
Bloody diarrhea
Fatigue
Crying
Vomiting

We just bought an 8 week old lab for Christmas. Afternoon purchasing her we noticed that had a lump on her chest thought to be a hernia. She had diarrhea from the Day we got her. I thought it was just just stess from new owners. Today is the third day we have had her and she has quit every eating began throwing up both food and just water. She isn't also pooping bright red blood with white dots in it. However the lump thought to be a hernia hasn't reduced in size. Are dogs able to pass hernias? Is that's what we are seeing? Is she sick? When should Be concerned?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

A hernia isn’t something that ‘passes’ like an obstruction; it is the movement of fat or organs through an opening, like fat or intestine through the umbilicus (belly button). If you are noticing the lump on her chest as opposed to her abdomen I would definitely get that checked out as soon as possible; also vomiting and blood diarrhoea are characteristic symptoms of Parvo which is a serious viral disease in unvaccinated animals which has a high mortality rate (>90%) without supportive care. The white dots may be proglottids from tapeworms, so that needs to be conformed and treated too. I would recommend visiting a Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Puddles
Shitzu pekignese
6 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

occasional quivering
occasional shortness of breath
lethargy
distension

Old, big hernia larger and warm. Not sure she's really Pekinese, larger than most Shitzu dogs I have seen.

This rescue dog is blind and has had a large, swinging hernia since we got her. She is still menstruating about once a year, just finished the last one maybe six weeks ago. The hernia is now larger and is no longer cool, and she has lost most of her playfulness and spends more time sleeping and cuddling with us than before. She will now chase down the bouncing ball only once, then just sit on the floor to rest. She used to play for up to 40 minutes at a time.

No vomiting, no diarrhea, had a normal BM yesterday then in the evening was trying for a while but nothing came out. Still takes water and some food.

No money for an operation. She also did not even bark for 3 weeks when we first got her, but until last week would charge to the end of the front yard and challenge dogs, bicycles, and even cars. Now she only barks at the front door...how do we tell when she is suffering enough to be put down? I have wanted every animal that comes into this house to be warm, fed, safe and loved for as long as possible.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

I am assuming from your description that the hernia is an umbilical hernia (as opposed to inguinal or perineal). Many dogs that have hernias are generally not affected by them as they usually comprise of fat passing through the opening; in some cases intestine or other organs can pass through leading to strangulation which causes pain and may lead to shock and death in severe cases. Whilst I understand your financial situation and applaud you taking in a rescue (which more people should do), your Veterinarian should take a look at Puddles to determine the involvement of the hernia and if there is another cause causing the change in behaviour. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Mitzi
Poodle mix
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Hernia

I picked up a rescue dog that is very poor shape. She has a large tennis ball sized mass coming from her stomach. She is severely thin with ribs and spine visable. I took her to emergency vet who said she believed it is hernia with intestines. She said it felt rope like inside. She also has an additional mass that the get thought could be mammory cancer. The vet did not think situation was life threatening and suggested we go to normal vet for xrays. Would this type of hernia cause this extreme weight issue. She is literally skin and bones. She is eating, drinking, peeing and pooping. She is drinking a large amount of water. She doesn't appear to be in any pain most all of the time, but she does whimper occasionly.
Is there anything that I should do to combat the weight loss?
Poor girl is likely 10 to 12 years old.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Hernias may cause weight loss due to a loss of appetite due to pain or the weight loss maybe due to another cause like parasites. If there is intestinal involvement in the hernia, it would be best to have the surgery done as soon as possible to reduce the risk of intestinal strangulation. Mammary tumours are possible, especially if she hasn’t been spayed; she could be spayed at the same time as the hernia. It would be best to visit your regular Veterinarian for x-rays or ultrasound of the hernia and suspected tumour; whilst not an emergency, you shouldn’t leave it too long. To help her gain weight you may try feeding a nutrient rich feed additive (you would need to see what product is available in your location). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you for the information. Would the hernia cause more pain for her after eating? The person I rescued her from said she has had the hernia for 5 or more years.
The vet today said that she was too unhealthy and would likely not survive surgery. What are options at that point?

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Nana
Shih Tzu
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Bruised under the skin
Hernia

My dog had undergone a hernia repair a year ago. However, two days ago, the stitches (which could usually be felt under the skin) was no longer the usual size. Currently, there's a bulge with a bruise (looks like internal bleeding). I could feel a bit of the stitch above the bulge thou. She's eating well, and still active. What could be the reason for the bruise on the bulge?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Whilst it is uncommon for complications to occur after hernia surgery, especially after one year (they usually occur days to weeks after); the probable cause maybe due to trauma or movement during playing. If there is a haematoma under the skin, the body will naturally break this down and will absorb it back into the body; you should still get your Veterinarian to check Nana over and to have any stitches or staples removed if not necessary. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ruby
Yorkie mix
14 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

raised lump
lump where hernia repair was

My Yorkiepoo is just over 1. An umbilical hernia developed after I got her as a puppy. I had it repaired when she was spayed at 7 months. I noticed there was a pokey stitch that aI could feel for a couple of months after the surgery but the vet said it would dissolve. a couple of months after the stitch disappeared, she started to develop a lump in the area. After taking her to the vet, 6 months post-op, he said that the repair was fine, that it was just a pocket of fat. Should I get a second opinion?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

You do have a right to a second opinions, but I always recommend being courteous and telling your regular Veterinarian that you are going for one. Some hernia repairs do fail and that doesn’t necessarily mean it was down to an incorrect procedure. Fat accumulation may occur anywhere on the body or the fat may have passed through the umbilical opening making it palpable on the abdomen.Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sky
Poodle
9 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Bulge near groin area

My 9 yr old poodle was diagnosed with having a hernia near his rear. The mesh needed for surgery is not available however the vet wants to operate to try to fix without the mesh. Should I go ahead with this?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

I assume by rear, you mean a perineal hernia. For uncomplicated hernias, the mesh may not be necessary as correction and strengthening can be done without; in cases of recurrence or in larger dogs mesh would definitely be required. I am just writing generally and basing my comment on Sky being a Poodle. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Flicka
Brittany (Spaniel)
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Umbilical hernia

Medication Used

None.

Our two nad half year old Brittany just delivered 8 puppies, one died due to umbilical difficulties that resulted in her intestines leaving her body. Five have umbilical hernias due to the poorly executed umbilical cord cuts by the mom. These were Bred and born to be show and field competition dogs, yet now they have such faults and health issues. My question is is it possible for us to surgically fix the hernias before they leave at 10 weeks old, or are we giving families a large financial burden to deal with in six months? The hernias were caused by aggressive grooming habits of our female. We have to watch her closely.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Umbilical hernias may be congenital or acquired (through trauma etc…). Performing surgery at a young age isn’t advisable, especially if there are no complications from the hernia. A decision to operate would be at the Veterinarian's discretion, but if they are operated on you should still advise any buyers of the surgical correction. If the hernias are corrected, there should be no need for any further surgery. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Mila
Chihuahua
8 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

None
no symptoms

Hi i have a 8 month year old dog she weighs 5 pounds when i adopted her she was already spayed. I've always noticed this little hard thing popping out i just thought it was normal and just thought thats how her belly button is. Until yesterday it starting bleeding and it was swollen with white stuff coming out which she started to lick so i put a cone on her so she wont lick or bite it. Today i checked and its looking a little better its now smaller than a pea. Should i let it heal on its own or does she need surgery. She is still very energetic and normal. She has no symptoms and thats why i find it so weird and random.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Usually protrusions from the umbilicus are umbilical hernias and are usually not be be worried about. If there has been some discharge and bleeding I would recommend having your Veterinarian take a look and at least prescribe some antibiotics or possibly surgery depending on the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lexie
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
2 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Large lump at belly button

Medication Used

None

My dog had her umbilical hernia repaired when she was desexed at 15 weeks of age (this was done by the breeder). About 8 months ago I noticed that her hernia has come back and at the time the vet said that it was okay and to keep an eye on it. Today I've noticed that it has gotten a lot bigger, I would say it's about 3-4cm in length now when it was only about 2-3cm before. What causes hernia repairs to fail? And should I be worried that it had gotten bigger in size? It doesn't seem to cause her any pain, there's no redness at the site and there has been no change in her behaviour.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Umbilical hernias are usually not serious and are normally corrected during another surgery (neutering etc…); if the hernia has recurred, it isn’t a big problem but if it grows in size (which it has), changes colour or is painful it should be checked by your Veterinarian. Umbilical hernias are caused by a failure of the umbilical closure (belly button); recurrence (if it occurs at all) is soon after surgery due to dehiscence of sutures, other causes may be due to trauma or increased intra abdominal pressure. I would suggest visiting your Veterinarian for another check. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lexi
Yorkshire Terrier
10 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Swollen hind legs
Bulge over incision
Pain
Swelling

My yorkie had surgery to remove a mammory tumor, a month later right in the middle of the incision site she has a bulge. She is in pain, her hind legs are swollen, the entire stomach area is red. She is on antibiotics. We have been told 1st it was a suture reaction, then it was a hernia, now they say it's the tumor re growing. All in the same week, unfortunately 3 different vets in the same clinic. Is a hernia something that can happen at an incision site? Her tumors were never painful before.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

All causes put forward are possible, although hernia would only occur if the abdominal wall was compromised. I cannot say the cause without examining Lexi; however a fine needle aspirate or an ultrasound would give a better picture of what is happening and the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bessie
Cavapoo
1.5
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia

My dog has a small hernia, I went to the vets today to discuss breeding her, they strongly recommended I didn't. If I have the hernia corrected by surgery would pregnancy still be a risk for her? I was informed that it could still rupture even if the operation is done before. Is this correct information?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

The type of hernia is important as umbilical and inguinal hernias get pressure on them during day to day activity and perineal hernias get pressure on them during defecation and whelping. Surgical repair of hernias is usually curative, but recurrence may occur in some cases; also some breeding organisations think it is poor practice to breed a dog which has had a hernia. There is always a risk of recurrence of hernias, with or without pregnancy. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ryder
Miniature Pinscher
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Reverse sneezing and normal sneezing
Depression
Vomiting

I have a two year old male Min Pin that's been suffering from a hernia for about two months now. First 2 weeks vomiting everyday (10x+ food and yellow and white foam) with no medication. He reverse sneeze a lot, lost interest in a lot of things expect being under me and it's 100% depressed. 4th week he had injections to stop vomiting and antibiotics. Nothing changed. Last month switched vets, gets prescribed gastric medication, Prilosec, Benadryl, a stomach protective pill, and cerenia after x rays and radiologists finds the hernia. Today, he woke up (5am) cry and reverse sneezing a lot then vomits (sometimes food, sometimes white foam but today white foam) I give him the gastric pill, Prilosec, and Benadryl and we go back to sleep so he's fine. Wakes up (9am) but vomits yellow thick slime twice before I feed him his stomach protective pill because it has to be two hours from the others. He's fine, on and off sleeping but barley no movement. Poops and pee fine. Farts and burp a lot. He always starts to reverse sneeze when he do a lot of movement like walking from the house to the car. (1pm) vomits on the side of my car right before we get in but always reverse sneeze before he vomits. I give him his gastric pill as told and Benadryl as told. He's fine in the car with me but vomits again around 8pm and then he takes his last gastric of the day, Benadryl again, I was told the Prilosec again but I don't because I give him the cerania. Vomits again around 10pm and then sleeps the rest of the night fine. At first it was higher than 10 times a day but today was 6 and before the hernia it was 0. I need help and to figure out what to do to help my dog because I don't want to loose him.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

There is a good chance that the reverse sneezing and hernia are not related; the reverse sneezing is usually a symptom of nasal irritation causing the body to try to remove the blockage, the reverse sneezing may irritate the back of the throat causing Ryder to vomit. Also, hernias may also cause vomiting but is usually related to severe pain and diarrhoea; most hernias do not need to be repaired unless they become strangled or cause other problems, also the type of hernia (umbilical, diaphragmatic, perineal, inguinal) and size has a bearing on severity. If the reverse sneezing continues, an x-ray of the nasal passage and rhinoscopy may be required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jerry
Pug
14 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Big bulge
Bump on the somach
He is a very active dog as of now
Hernia

My pug jerry 14 months old, had an umblical hernia surgery last month.he seemed fine. But now again there is a protrusion. (Same hernia) .we have a strong waist belt to hold it in place. Should we operate again? Or will it disappear on its own as he grows up. We keep him on half feed . Pls write back asap

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Generally, if a hernia will self resolve it would occur within the first six months or so of life; fourteen months is a bit old for a spontaneous closure. It would be best to have the surgery redone to prevent the risk of complications from strangulated hernia and a mesh placed over the hernia site to help prevent recurrence; these options should be discussed with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chloe
Shih Tzu
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

no symptoms at this time

Hi. I have shih tzu and 10years of age. She has umbilical hernia since birth but the doctor adviced to just watched out for it since it was small and soft then. But now it becomes bigger in size and sometimes hard and red. Our vet asked us to do the surgery now. But I'm worried that my shih tzu is already old and won't survive the surgery. Any advice?

No symptoms of sickness as of the moment.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Whilst ten is old, there is no reason under normal circumstances that the surgery shouldn’t go ahead; spaying may also be useful to be carried out at the same time. In dogs which are over seven or have passed 75% of their expected lifespan (Veterinarian’s preference) should have pre anaesthetic blood tests carried out as well as the normal physical examination that is carried out prior to surgery. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Vicky
Indian
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Swelling near groin area, difficulty in walking

My pet dog of age 3 years is diagnosed with hernia. Veterinarian said that we should observe for sometime and see if it heals before going in for the surgery. In the mean time, my dog has stopped barking altogether and always has his tail tucked inbetween his legs as though trying to protect his groin area. Is this normal?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Most hernias are not much to be concerned about and unless they grow, change colour or cause pain can be just monitored; if you are noticing changes in tail carriage or other behavioural changes it may be a sign of discomfort and surgery may be required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Evee
Shih Tzu
3 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Less Active
Pain when touched

hello,I have a 3 month old shih tzu puppy who was born with hernia.The man who sold it to us didnt tell us that she was born with hernia or that she had gotten surgery before we got her.So today I found a redish yellow dot on her stomach(near her left leg) so we took her to the guy who sold her to us and told us that she was born with hernia and had gotten surgery for it.He said not to worry about it and gave us some medicine for her and told us to make sure she doesnt play to much to much and to get rest. But She only feels pain when touched on it.Should I be worried?should I go to a vet for help?what type of hernia does she have?To me she seems normal but I just wanna make sure she will be ok.What do you think?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

From the description (stomach near left leg) I would say that it would be an inguinal hernia; these types of hernias are usually corrected at the time of spay and are corrected earlier if there is a medical reason to. Given Evee’s age, I would visit your Veterinarian to take a look at the hernia and (if not already started) speak to them about vaccination as well. The first link below is to our page on inguinal hernias and the second is a picture of the normal location of an inguinal hernia. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.vetary.com/dog/condition/inguinal-hernia
www.vetbook.org/wiki/dog/images/0/08/Inguinalhernia01.jpg

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Bailey
Shih Tzu
10 Weeks
Mild condition
-1 found helpful
Mild condition

My teddy bear puppy (shitzu & bichon) is 10 weeks old. The vet discovered she has a small umbilical cord hernia. Vet suggested to repair hernia at 6 months while doing the spaying. Is this how we should proceed? Or does the operation need to be done sooner? Is it safe to do both operations at one time? Is it too much anesthesia and extra gas? Will she wake from this operation and be okay? I heard two operations at once is not a good idea. Can you please advise.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

I understand your concern, but I agree with your Veterinarian. As long as there are no complications from the hernia and it is not causing pain or difficulty in moving then it can wait for the spay surgery. As far as two operations; I would still classify it as one operation (maybe one and one tenth of an operation) as the incision for the spay will start caudal to the umbilicus and will go caudally (towards the tail), after the spay is finished the hernia will be resolved with one or two sutures along with the surgical incision. No additional anaesthesia, no additional gas required. Small hernias around a centimetre in size may spontaneously resolve themselves within a few months. Obviously, if you notice any new symptoms like pain, lack of appetite or increased size of hernia, visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bella
Miniature yorkie
2 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lick
Licks at affected area

I was told that my 2 year old mini yorkie had a hernia. The vet said it was nothing to worry about, but now it seems her mood is changing. She is sleepier and doesn't eat like normal. I'm very worried, what should I do??

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

The type of hernia and location will determine the severity, hernias are usually either umbilical (belly button), perineal (through the pelvic floor) or inguinal (groin); and may involve only fat or organs (intestine, liver etc…). If a hernia is simple (only fat) and not causing any symptoms or discomfort, it is safe to just monitor the size; if symptoms of lethargy, changes in appetite, pain or any other symptom then a revisit to your Veterinarian is required to see if the hernia has any organ involvement. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lola
Jack Russell Terrier
7 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia

My dog has had an umbilical hernia since she was just a pup. The vet has always said that there is no need to worry, but I've noticed that over the last few months it has gotten bigger in size. It's about 4 fingers wide. It doesn't seem to be causing her any problems but I'm still worried about it.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Umbilical hernias may increase and decrease in size depending on the quantity of fat (mainly) that passes through the hernia; usually Veterinarians aren’t concerned with hernias unless intestines or other organs pass through the opening leading to complications, hernias are usually repaired during other surgeries (spay or foreign body removal) unless they are determined to be dangerous. Your Veterinarian should be informed of the increase in size and you may elect to have the hernia repaired for peace of mind. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Nakeela
St Bernard mix
5 Months
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

None

I have a 5 month old St Bernard mix that i adopted. When i got her at about 14weeks old, she had just had a umbelical hernia operation, after a few weeks we realized it wasn't healing, bright her back in, her hernia hadn't healed, do another surgery. That was 1 1/2 months ago. 2 days ago i was feeling the scar tissue area and i can now feel a squishy lump forming, it feels like the start of a hernia. What should i do? Call the vet where she had the original surgery? Or take her somewhere else?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

It is unusual for a hernia to be repaired so young unless it was causing pain, discomfort or was life threatening; normally we wait for around six months and combine the surgery with neutering. Hernias may recur, but it is unusual to recur twice; I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian or another Veterinarian to see if it is another hernia. If the hernia isn’t causing any problem and is just fat, it may be nothing to worry about in the short term; each Veterinarian has their own opinion and experience, but ultimately it is best to have it repaired. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Buddy
Rat Terrier
11 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Cystitis

My dog is an 11 year old rat terrier. He has a perineal hernia and the vet has suggested to operate. He gets a lot of urinary infections as well, is this a symptom of the hernia? will the surgery stop the cystitis? What are the chances the hernia will reappear? What is the prognosis overall?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Perineal hernias are overrepresented in intact males over the age of seven; generally treatment is directed at correction of the hernia and castration where necessary. Perineal hernias also cause problems with the urinary tract and may well contribute to conditions like cystitis. Surgical correction is the treatment of choice, however recurrence occurs in around 15% of cases; medical management leading up to surgery include use of stool softeners and dietary management. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.acvs.org/small-animal/perineal-hernias

My 3 months lebrador have hernia(Checked by doctor) he suggested to operate. Is there any other way?

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oscar
Labrador Retriever
3 months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia

My 3 months lebrador have hernia(Checked by doctor) he suggested to operate. Is there any other way?

He is very weak according to his age and he is not able to control pee. please suggest.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
There are different types of hernia (umbilical, inguinal, perineal etc…). Depending on the hernia and its effects on the patient, we suggest in many cases to wait for a dog to be around six months of age but if the hernia is producing unwanted and unmanageable symptoms or effects, earlier surgery may be indicated to correct the issue. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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lucy
shih tzu mix silky
10 weeks and 700grams
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

sudden extreme difficulty in breathing

hello last night my puppy suddenly had difficulty in breathing and collapsed.. we took her to the emergency vet and they gave her O2 and IV fluids and she has stabilized.. after Xray was done they told us she had a big diaphragmatic hernia and part of her intestines were in her chest.. we r ao shocked bcuz she didnt have any symptoms beyond breathing heavily since we got her from the breeder 12 days ago (we had taken her to the vet for that and he had told us its fine and only worry if she cant get up).. now with this diagnosis we r sooo shocked and very very sad.. the vets told us she needs major surgery which they think she most likely wont survive bcuz of her age and very small size.. so they gave us the options of either surgery or putting her to sleep.. as she is in much pain and her condition is going to make her suffer until she dies or taking the risk and doing surgery..
can u pls help us we r torn between wanting her to survive in any way possible but at the same time we dont want her to suffer for our need to have her with us.. so pls can u let us know if this surgery in this case for this pup has a good chance of survival or not? looking forward to ur reply thank u

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Prognosis of diaphragmatic hernia repair varies depending on the literature, but it is accepted that the earlier the surgery is performed the better the prognosis. The surgery is a major surgery which requires a large incision and has numerous possible complications post surgery (pneumothorax, pulmonary edema etc…). Lucy is very small and this is a traumatic surgery for her, in these cases I usually suggest to follow your Veterinarian’s recommendation as I haven’t examined Lucy and they will only suggest surgery if they believe it is a viable option. Consultation with a board Veterinary Surgeon may also help you make your decision, see link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.acvs.org/small-animal/diaphragmatic-hernia www.acvs.org/files/proceedings/2012/data/papers/108.pdf http://find.vetspecialists.com/

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Chester
Pomeranian
11 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My dog just done an umbilical hernia surgery 6 months ago. Now he has to do another surgery to repair his inguinal hernia. How safe is it to do another surgery in the same year (hes almost 11 years)? and could he have another hernia remember this is a second time? thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
The decision to operate would be with your Veterinarian (but your decision in the end); if Chester is otherwise healthy and has no other health issues especially with his heart, liver or kidneys there should be no reason why he cannot have another surgery unless your Veterinarian finds something on physical examination before surgery. Hernias may occur for a variety of reasons and it is possible that a hernia may recur or the opposite side may develop a hernia as well. Hernias are usually cheaper and easier to correct before they cause any complications; although some dogs live their whole lives with a hernia without incident whilst other have complications immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ginger
Pomeranian
2 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Sad
lack of appetite

I have a 2 year old Pomeranian and she already got hernia — I guess it's Inguinal hernia since it is near her left leg — when we got her last summer. I didn't knew it was hernia til I brought her to the vet. She's not showing any symptoms at all so I just ignored the lump. She's very active everyday so I thought everything is okay. Two months after, we moved in to a new house and I noticed the change in her attitude. She's no longer the hyper Pomeranian that I got used to. Sometimes, she doesn't want to eat (even her dog treat — it's her favorite) and she's always asleep. I thought the reason why she's like that because of the change of environment. I went to the vet and she explained to me that she has Hernia and it would cost us to have a surgery. We honestly can't afford. It's been a week already and I'm still observing my bitch. She started eating already few weeks ago, started running a little bit but still not active enough. Also, I noticed that her tummy got bloated but not showing any symptoms that she's on pain or anything. Should I be worried and does she really need to have a surgery? Is there other ways that Inguinal hernia could be gone? Thanks

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Generally surgeries like inguinal hernia are corrected at the same time as spaying to reduce the number of anaesthetic cycles and cost. I generally recommend correction of hernias as they can cause complications at any time during life, although some dogs have them all their life without incident; correction of a hernia is cheaper than stabilisation and surgery if it becomes a problem, prevention is cheaper than cure for example. But it is your decision whether or not to have the surgery and I understand your financial position; charity clinics may be able to help, one charity clinic (to give you an idea on price) in Virginia quotes $455 for inguinal hernia repair which is reasonable (link below). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.helpinghandsvetva.com/procedures-pricing/ (click on Hernia Repair)

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Dutchess
Norwegian Elkhound
7 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

I have a 7 year old un-spayed female Norwegian Elkhound/Rottweiler/Lab mix with a inguinal hernia in her groin area. She's been playful, eating, drinking, bathroom duties just fine, but the hernia is enlarging. Is this a serious situation for her?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
If the hernia is enlarging, it should be seen by your Veterinarian and should be corrected; also at the same time your Veterinarian could also spay her if you are not planning on breeding her. We don’t correct all hernias, but if they grow in size, change colour or cause pain we prefer to correct the hernia before it becomes an emergency (being proactive in prevention). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bug
Hound mixed with lab
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

So my dog got spayed at the humane society before I got her in august. She hasn’t had any problems and I followed all the rules for her spay. Recently within the last week, she has developed a small bump on the spay scar and it doesn’t hurt her when I touch it and she doesn’t seem bothered with it or mess with it. What should I do? It hasn’t gotten any bigger maybe a bit smaller. It just look like the size of the end of a q tip and ya almost see through with slight pink color.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
It is possible that you are feeling a seroma which is nothing to worry about, but it should be confirmed by your Veterinarian to make sure. A seroma is a collection of fluid under the skin which can be blood tinged giving it a pinkish appearance; I would suggest keeping an eye on it but have it checked out by your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sam
Viszla
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My dog is a Viszla, 7 yrs old, very healthy.
I keep his vaccinations at the minimum (rabbies only) and annual checkups with blood tests etc
Last night I discovered a small soft lump, pea size on the ombilic.very similar with the 3rd picture you have it posted on your webpage re to hernia
Does he need a special diet ? Will this hernia absorb on its own ? Should I get worried ?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
A small pea size lump near the umbilicus may be attributable to many different things, it would be best to keep an eye on the lump in the meantime and look out for for any changes in colour or size. If there is no change, just bring it up with your Veterinarian at your next visit. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Doug
Dachshund
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

none

We have a 3 year old dachshund who underwent a laparotomy and enterotomy for foreign body removal when he was around 1. Just today we noticed he has a small (1 cm diameter) and reducible ventral incisional hernia. I am a general surgeon and know that in people, it is generally okay to watch these. Our dog has had poor experiences with general anesthesia in the past and my question is, so long as this remains small and reducible, is an observational approach appropriate in dogs as well?
Mike

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
If the hernia is small, it should be fine to monitor the hernia, as many small hernias do not cause problems in dogs. My only concern is why has the hernia suddenly appeared? It isn't normal to have a herniation as a surgery site 2 years post-op. While it doesn't seem emergent, it would be a good idea to keep a close eye on the area, and have your veterinarian take a look at it at Doug's next regular appointment. If he shows signs of pain or distress, then it would be a good idea to have him seen right away.

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No Name Yet
Mini Bernedoodle
8 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Small Hernia

I am looking to buy an 8 week puppy, but it has a small Inguinal hernia. The breeder has offered to operate before we purchase her, but want to make sure I shouldn't worry about hernia recurrence or any other effects after surgery and removal of the small hernia. Would love some advice.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Normally inguinal hernias have a low recurrence rate after surgery and there is little to be concerned about, normally these types of hernias don’t self resolve and I would certainly recommend having it corrected. I wouldn’t have any concerns about purchasing a dog with a repaired inguinal hernia. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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jack
Maltese Shih Tzu
9 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

hi my dog has a hernia and is 9 months old and very active, and has no symptoms at all . while awaiting for his surgery can he still go on walks or runs. he just loves to run and jump and does not seem top be affected by the bulge(quarter-size) at all.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Some dogs have no problems with hernias whilst other may require emergency surgery; whilst it is best to keep Jack calm and reduce pressure on the abdomen, as long as the bulge doesn’t grow in size or change colour you should be concerned. Obviously Jack needs the surgery and prevention is the best course of action, if Jack isn’t neutered it can be done at the same time. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Parker
pit bull terrier
7 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

lump above groin

I have a 7 year old neutered male pit/lab mix. The other day when he was rolling around on his back, I noticed an egg shaped raised area above his groin on the right side. It is soft and doesn't seem to bother him. He is active and eating/drinking normally. From the size of it, I can't imagine not noticing it if it had been there for awhile. Could this be a hernia ? I have a vet appointment scheduled for 5 days from now. Is that too long to wait ?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It might be a hernia, or a lipoma, or a lymph node, from your description - you should be fine to keep his appointment in 5 days, as long as he continues to eat and drink normally and doesn't' become lethargic, or start vomiting or having diarrhea. Your veterinarian will be able to assess the lump, see what it is, and decide what the best therapy is. I hope that everything goes well for him!

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oscar
Collie
8 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Trouble passing stools

My border collie had a gastric torsion and the vet operated and saved his life, this was 8 months ago but now he's having problems emptying his bowels, he struggles to go and sometimes squeals when trying to pass anything, the vet had to sedate him to empty his waste due to a blockage, the vet thinks he may have a hernia and I was wondering if its a big operation and what the recovery time will be.
Our vet is top class and cant do enough to help, im just concerned about the recovery as hes 8yr old and has no other health issues.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without knowing more about what your veterinarian found, and without being able to examine Oscar, I'm not sure that I can comment on his recovery, as I don't know the type of hernia, the size, or the severity. Recovery will depend on all of those things. It would be best to ask your veterinarian regarding the extent of the surgery and what the expected recuperation will be, as they are aware of his health status. I hope that all goes well for him.

Many thanks

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Leo
Pekingese
9 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

nothing

Our 9 month old Pekingese male has had a smallish hernia since we got him at 8 weeks old. It doesn't seem to bother him and he is very playful and has always been eating and drinking fine.
He hasn't been neutered yet, why is it necessary to neutere him (we aren't planning to breed) and will can happen if he doesn't get neutered (we obviously don't want anything to happen to him?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Neutering is recommended for many reasons including preventing any unwanted pregnancies (with another dog not him obviously), preventing aggressive behaviour, tumours (if there are no testicles a testicular tumour cannot develop), prevention of benign prostatic hyperplasia among other positives; I would recommend neutering regardless as the positives outweigh any negatives which may be thought of. As for the hernia, Leo may go his whole life without an issue or it may one day turn into a medical emergency; it is best to have it corrected to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Duke
English Bulldog
6 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia

I purchased an English Bulldog at 8 Weeks that had an umbilical hernia repaired. He is male and we have no intentions on breeding so we weren’t concerned. Within the first week of having him the hernia was back. He did not have any symptoms and it didn’t get much bigger so we decided to wait to repair (our vet was not concerned either. We got it repaired again around 4 months old. Within about 3 Weeks a bubble again appeared in the same area. Is his hernia really back again? Is it common for after two repairs to still have an issue?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Umbilical hernias have a low recurrence rate (less than 5%) with second surgery being normally curative; it is however possible to have the hernia occur for a third time, this may be due to too much activity after surgery or dehiscence of sutures. The lump you are feeling may be the hernia recurring but may also be a seroma if it is pea sized, without examining Duke I cannot say what the cause is; you should discuss with your Veterinarian and a mesh may be required to be placed to add strength to the area. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a female who has an umbilical hernia we discovered. She had a litter at 1 1/2 7 female. Now that she has the hernia can we get her repaired without fixing her?

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Frankie
Labrador Retriever
11 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

A bulge

My friends 11 year old dog developed an inguinal hernia, and when her veterinary surgeon operated on the hernia, he also castrated him, without her consent, as he claimed it would reduce complications, is this true? he has charged her for the castration, and I'm unsure if she should make a complaint, she is on a very low income and I'm concerned the veterinary surgeon may have taken advantage of a vulnerable pensioner. I myself feel the dog was too old to be operated on, and certainly too old to warrant castration, especially considering it was only a small hernia with no symptoms, discovered during an annual check-up, please advise, thanks.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Inguinal hernias are commonly associated with intact male dogs, and doing the surgery without neutering him would have been irresponsible. Her veterinarian probably should have communicated better, but it seems that they took the right course of action.

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Joey
Maltese
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

he still runs and jumps . He still plays with my other dog. If you can't see the hernia you would never know he have one . I just was rubbing his stomach one day and felt it.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
There are many different types of hernias, and I'm not sure without seeing Joey which kind he has. It may not be a problem for him, but to be sure it would be a good idea to ask your veterinarian at his next appointment.

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Coco
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lump

My Dog gas a bulging near this umbilical region and looks very much like a hernia. We noticed it on 4 weeks and asked his vet. But be said that it is nothing to be concerned about. 2 years passed and he still has it. But he does not seem to show any symptoms and is completely fine. I pressed the area and he does not seem to experience pain either. Should i consult another vet?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
If there is a hernia, it is always best (in my opinion) to have it repaired as a simple repair is a lot cheaper than emergency surgery if there is a strangulation or other complication from the passage of abdominal contents. Some dogs live their whole life with hernias without incident whilst others may have complications. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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