Umbilical Hernia Average Cost

From 36 quotes ranging from $800 - 2,500

Average Cost

$1,200

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What is Umbilical Hernia?

In the case of an umbilical hernia, there is an opening in the muscle wall at the dog’s navel allowing contents of the dog’s abdomen to protrude. Although not the sole cause, umbilical hernias are genetic conditions and are most commonly found in the Airedale Terrier, Pekinese and Basenji breeds.

An umbilical hernia is a protrusion of the abdominal lining, abdominal fat, or abdominal organs through the area around the umbilicus (navel). This condition is caused by failure of the umbilical ring to close after birth.

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Symptoms of Umbilical Hernia in Dogs

The most remarkable symptom of an umbilical hernia is the protrusion itself, which appears as swelling beneath the dog’s navel and can protrude further during certain activities such as standing, barking or straining. Further symptoms include:

  • Noticeable pain
  • Warmth at the swollen site
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Malaise or depression
Types
Reducible

Typically smaller in size, a reducible umbilical hernia is one in which the protrusion may be pushed back into the abdomen by a veterinarian. In this case, the protrusion is simply abdominal lining or fat. Typically the only symptom seen in these cases is the swelling of the site itself.

Irreducible

Typically larger in size, an irreducible umbilical hernia is one in which part of one or more abdominal organs are protruding from the opening. In these cases, the organ(s) involved may become entrapped and their function compromised. In severe cases, an organ may become strangulated, meaning blood flow is completely cut off resulting in the death of tissue. A dog with an irreducible hernia typically exhibits more of the additional symptoms beyond the swelling of the site itself.

Causes of Umbilical Hernia in Dogs

Before birth, all dogs have an opening called an umbilical ring around their navels that allows the umbilical blood vessels to transmit nourishment to the fetus. In healthy dogs, this opening closes on its own after birth. The exact reason that the umbilical ring fails to close in some dogs is unknown. The prevalence of umbilical hernias in certain breeds and certain family lines indicates a genetic predisposition to the condition that can be passed on through generations.

Diagnosis of Umbilical Hernia in Dogs

The veterinarian typically diagnoses umbilical hernias easily upon feeling the protrusion. In irreducible umbilical hernias, x-rays and/or ultrasounds are required in order to determine if any abdominal organs are entrapped, and the severity of the entrapment.

Treatment of Umbilical Hernia in Dogs

Very small hernias (less than ¼ inch) in puppies under six months of age may be left to close on their own. Untreated hernias in young puppies typically close before six months. If your dog is outside of this age range, surgery may be required to close a small, reducible hernia and will likely be required in the case of an irreducible hernia. During surgery, the scar tissue that has formed around the hernia are removed, any organs that have become entrapped are returned to their proper place, and the opening in the muscle is closed with sutures. The only risks to this surgery are the general risks of anesthesia and surgery, such as bleeding and infection. Often, when caught early, umbilical hernia surgery is paired with spaying or neutering.

Recovery of Umbilical Hernia in Dogs

If your treatment does not involve surgery, it’s important to keep an eye on the hernia site for changes. If you have a puppy under the age of six months, watch the site to see if it closes by the six-month mark. If not, consult the veterinarian. If you have an older dog and the veterinarian did not recommend surgery because of the small size of the hernia, monitor the site for any changes or issues, and seek veterinary attention if anything develops.

If your dog underwent umbilical hernia surgery, carefully follow the veterinarian’s follow up instructions to ensure full recovery. Give your pet time and space to rest, and closely monitor him for adverse reactions (beyond the typical behavior the veterinarian predicts, such as sleepiness, lack of coordination, coughing or crying in the first few days).

Check the incision site daily for drainage and redness, as they are signs of infection and you will need to see the veterinarian as soon as possible. If the incision doesn’t appear to be holding, or if any intestinal material protrudes through the incision, seek attention immediately. During the first few days after surgery, feed carefully. Withhold food for a day if your dog vomits. Your dog’s appetite will normalize in a few days. Limit your dog’s physical activity for ten days in order to ensure proper healing. Take your dog outside on a leash to relieve itself, and do not let her run, jump or play.

Umbilical Hernia Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Little man
Shih Tzu
8 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Umbilical hernia

I just got a puppy and was informed by the owner he has an umbilical hernia but is otherwise healthy. They also informed me both of his parents have umbilical hernias and always have. I thought nothing of it until my mother voiced concern about it and said I should get it fixed. Should j just keep an eye on it and wait?

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
265 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Umbilical hernias can be a hereditary trait, so Little Man should not be used for breeding, and he should be neutered- I'm not sure if you were planning on having that done, but just in case you were not, you should. Whether the hernia needs to be repaired depends on a number of factors, including the size of the hernia and whether it is reducible or not. Your veterinarian can examine him, look at the hernia, and let you know if it needs to be repaired or if it isn't anything to worry about. I hope that everything goes well with him!

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Fendi
Husky
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Perfectly fine

I got my pup when she was 8 weeks old (husky/Shepherd/collie mix) and she had a hernia on her “belly button” . I took her into the vet and they said I shouldn’t be worried unless it grows or hurts her. I just noticed it’s gotten slightly bigger but she seems perfectly fine. It doesn’t bother her if I touch it or slightly push down on it. I’m just wondering if it’s something bad that needs to be dealt with!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations
Some umbilical hernias are nothing to be concerned about unless they grow in size, change shape or colour; if it has only grown a little bit, keep an eye on her in the meantime but it may be a case that surgical correction may be best and also spay her if you are not planning on breeding her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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sassy
American Staffordshire Terrier
11 Weeks
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

vomiting will not eat will not drink wobble depres

My 11 week old am staff female has had a hard knot in her belly button i am recently suffering from financial issue and no vet nearwill take payment I have no clue what to do and now she will not eat and when she finally ate some soft food she's been throwing everything she eats up will not drink what do I do

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

If there is a hard knot or protrusion coming from Sassy’s belly button, then an examination from a Veterinarian would be required to determine if the symptoms she is suffering from are due to the protrusion (hernia) or some other cause (foreign body, infection, parasites, poisoning etc…); normally an umbilical hernia causes very little trouble and is corrected at the same time as neutering. I understand your financial situation, however there are Veterinary financing options, charity clinics and practices which operate Angel Funds; I am unable to give you much advice as the underlying cause is unknown. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hello, Dr. Turner!

My beloved female chihuahua was born with an umbilical hernia. After we brought her home at 3 months of age, we took her to 2 different vet's that both assured us that her belly button lump was not something to worry about, as they were able to push it in without any physical resistance or discomfort. She will be turning 10 years old in February, and although she has gained a little weight since her puppy years, she's not obese by any means. However, in the last couple months her hernia has noticeably grown a bit. Though we are able to press on it without any "yipes!" or "squeaks!" on her end, the change in physical appearance is concerning to us, even though it almost reverts all the way back into her belly when pressed.

I should also mention that her bowel movements and eating habits are completely normal as of now.

Should we take her to be seen by our local Vet?

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Shiloh
Sharpie/basenji
10 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Bleeding in abdomen,

My dog was nearly 10 years old. When I adopted him at 3 months of age he had a little bump on his tummy; I thought that it must have been from his neutering operation (although he was a male). I took him to veterinarians regularly and visit one office for nearly 8 years. Last Spring, a new doctor at the vet's office informed that my dog had an umbilical hernia. I did not know what that little bump was and of all the veterinarians we had visit (6-7) that was the first time anyone had ever mentioned an umbilical hernia!My dog was 9 years old. I called the veterinarian that was kind enough to tell me that the bump was a hernia and asked him what he recommend I do? He never returned my phone call. That veterinarian office Had not returned my phone calls many times prior to that visit either and I was very put off by their office, plus they moved and the veterinarians were changing, etc. When my dog was a puppy he did not like to run with me but he enjoyed playing and playing fetch. He began eating grass to vomit when he was young and one vet. told me that he was just eating the grass to vomit; he did that occasionally and I thought it was "normal". A few months ago my dog did not want to walk or eat, he looked like he was in pain, then his tummy looked bloated so I rushed him to another veterinarian that was open on Saturday and they had us go to the hospital where he had surgery. The surgeon said that he was bleeding IN his abdomen. The surgeon also told me that my dog had developed an aggressive cancer called hermangiosarcoma. My dog died the next day. I am devastated and miss him so much. I wonder if the abdominal bleeding was caused from the umbilical hernia? Do umbellical hernias cause the abdomen to bleed? He lost a lot of blood. I am so disappointed that not one vet.mentioned an umbellical hernia before he was 9 years old!! the bump looked flatter, maybe 2 cm in diameter, as his tummy was also bigger. Can you tell me if an umbilical hernia causes bleeding IN the abdomen?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Condolences on your loss, it is hard when a loved one passes away especially if you believe is may have been preventable. Umbilical hernias normally cause strangulation of an organ that has passed through the opening leading to severe pain and a decrease of blood flow leading to shock and death if not treated. The bleeding in the abdomen would have most probably been caused by the hemangiosarcoma (if located in the abdomen on the liver or spleen) which is a cancer of the blood vessels which could have caused a weakness in the blood vessel wall leading to a bleed. I cannot advise you for 100% what occurred, but I would say the bleed was due to the hemangiosarcoma. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you. I REALLY appreciate your wisdom. In reading about the cancer: I am creating more outdoor shade for my other dog and adding vitamins and green vegetables to her new, grain-free diet. I DO miss my dear, 'ol sharpei and I only wanted to give him the best and never meant for him to be in any pain. Thank you so much for your article and suggestions.

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Bella
Yorkshire Terrier
5 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lump

My 5 year old yorkie has had 2 hernia repairs. The first was about 4 years ago. We adopted her from the shelter and it was done during her spay. About a year later it had returned and she was operated on again. Now, I feel another small round lump in that area. It is very smooth and perfectly round. She shows no signs of discomfort or lack of activity. Will she need another surgery? I worry about her having so many surgeries on this. She is a very active dog, jumping on furniture a lot. It is impossible to keep her from being so active. I am worried that all of her jumping may have caused the hernia again. And then if we do surgically fix it, will it just keep coming back?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Hernias may recur, but it isn’t common. In Bella’s case it is possible that the hernia has returned again. If the hernia isn’t causing any trouble, it may just be a case of let it be and keep an eye on it; if you choose surgery again, speak with your Veterinarian about a mesh that is put to strengthen the area to prevent recurrence. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Dallas
Bernese Mountain
7 Weeks
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

bulging umbilical

One of my beautiful Bernese Mountain Dog Puppies has an umbilical hernia that we have been watching very closely. We have informed the puppy buyer of this problem and were willing to decrease the price of the puppy to reflect the cost of the repair if it was indicated but now, since we will be shipping her by air have consulted with our vet and determined that there does seem to be intestinal involvement. My puppy is only 7 1/2 weeks old and the hernia is roughly the diameter of a nickel, this is a 14 pound puppy. I do have a photo of it. I'm just wondering if it is involving her intestine, she eats, plays, shows no discomfort even when you push it back inside. I hate the idea of putting such a young baby under anesthesia if it can wait until she is spayed, if it is even necessary at that point.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

It is always favourable to repair umbilical hernias at the time of spaying or another surgery so that a dog doesn’t need to go through two rounds of anaesthesia. The intestinal involvement would be more evident by touch than by eye; fat hernias feel quite smooth and are generally uninterrupted in consistency, when there is intestinal involvement the feeling is different (gas may be felt). The problem comes with hernias with intestinal involvement (reducible or not) when there is the risk of strangulation; whilst Dallas may eat, drink, defecate and play, there is always the risk of intestinal strangulation which is a medical emergency and may lead to death. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you so much Dr. Turner for your rather quick response. Dallas is scheduled for herniorrhaphy surgery tomorrow morning. We drop her off at 8:15am. Thank God we were on the right track and are doing the right thing for our beautiful lil Dallas. Her new mama is already in love with her and she is going to have a wonderful life. Thank you again Dr. Turner and I hope you continue to be blessed.

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Bailley
Chihuahua/ Rat Terrier
6 Months
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Dark colored bump on abdominal region 2 cm diamete

My dog is a chihuahua hybrid and is 6 months old, it has this bump on his abdominal region, it's getting darker in color and larger in size every week and I don't know what it is, I'm taking him to the vet as soon as possible but I was wondering if he has time or if this is a crucial and my dog doesn't have enough time.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

If the bump is at the umbilicus (belly button) then the cause maybe an umbilical hernia which may be caused by a passage of fat through the opening (best scenario) or intestines (worst scenario); a visit to your Veterinarian should be made as soon as possible as the blue colour may indicate congestion of venous blood and should be seen as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you so much Dr. Turner

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Victory, Liberty and Justice
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Umbilical hernia

3 females from our 2 yr old Aussies first litter have minor umbilical hernias, what do you suggest as far as treatment, if any. Will this reduce their selling price? Could it be the Mother's fault? Thank you so much.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Umbilical hernias maybe classed as hereditary in some cases, but may occur due to trauma or other causes. Some umbilical hernias resolve themselves within six months of age but some persist; they are usually corrected during spaying. Normally umbilical hernias are just fat passing through the opening, but in some cases intestine or other abdominal content passes through and may cause strangulation which is a medical emergency; if you see discolouration, signs of pain, loss of appetite or other concerning symptoms visit your Veterinarian immediately, otherwise consult with your Veterinarian during a vaccination visit. Reducing the price of the pups is usual, but would be at your discretion, but many prospective buyers would look for a discount. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank your for your prompt and expert advice!

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Marcus
Mixed
2-3 yrs old
Mild condition
2 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

small umbilical hernia

Medication Used

None

Hello Dr.

We adopted from a rescue a small male (16 lbs) mixed terrier/schnauzer, 2 to 3 yrs old. We brought him to the vet yesterday and he found a very small umbilical hernia, he did not disclose the size, but had my wife feel it. He said that it should have been taken care of when he was neutered. He recommended surgery to close it. I informed the lady at the rescue who I know for 40 years and she recommended that we don't do the surgery. She said that if it is indeed very small because he is a male it shouldn't be a problem later in his life. She says she has a male dog who's had this condition for many years with no problems. She believes that the surgery may be more of a risk for him. So we are now confused on what we should do. Can you shed an insight or recommendation please?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Umbilical hernias are usually harmless and unless they pose a health threat, are monitored for growth or other changes and are usually corrected during a different surgery as an “add on”; normally the hernia would comprise of fat, but if the intestine pass through, the complication may lead to death if not resolved quickly. The decision to operate is yours, obviously if you choose to operate; you remove the risk of complications; but most dogs with untreated hernias lead normal lives. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Dutchess
Mixed
11 Weeks
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

My 11 week old puppy didn't have a hernia when I got her she a porkie and my big dog jump on her now it poking out and now it looks white ! Is it infection in it ? she acting the same ? What should I do?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Umbilical hernia’s may be congenital or acquired (usually by trauma); congenital hernia’s usually resolve themselves within six months of age, acquired hernia’s usually require surgery. Having not personally examined Dutchess, I can only generalise and you should visit your Veterinarian for a definitive diagnosis. The colour of the hernia will depend on skin pigmentation and the colour of the herniation (fat is usually white). If Dutchess doesn’t present any other symptoms (vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, behavioural changes) it would be safe to monitor her progress and have the hernia repaired at six months of age during spaying; if she does present with new symptoms, visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Keefer Southerland
Chihuahua/ Rat Terrier
3 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Visible Lump

Medication Used

None

I recently notice what looks like an umbilical hernia on my 3 year old Rat Terrier/Chiuahua mix. He is still eating and doesn't seem to be in any pain. Is this something I should take him to the vet for right away?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

If the lump is where Keefer Southerland’s (great name by the way) belly button is, it is most probably an umbilical hernia. Umbilical hernias are usually in puppies and can resolve themselves, in adult dogs the cause of umbilical hernias is usually trauma. Normally a hernia is as simple as some abdominal fat passing through the opening causing the lump; however it is possible that intestinal loops may pass through causing complications like strangulation of the intestine leading to blood vessel occlusion and other complications. Fatty hernias may come and go or may be permanently out; if there are no other symptoms you can just watch him until his next check up, or visit your Veterinarian for piece of mind. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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ruby
Shih Tzu
8 Months
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My dog is a 8-9 month old Shih tzu who I rescued and I think that she had an umbilical hernia when we got her immediately after they neutered her and they didn't fix it. Now my vet is saying she may need surgery but I really don't want to put her through something so tramatic after she already has had a rough start to begin with (she lived in a hoarders car for her first months of her life). When she plays with my sisters havanese I notice that the umbilical hernia gets rather puffy. its probably the size of a nickel. would you suggest surgery?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Surgical correction is your choice. In small breed dogs it is possible for a small simple hernia to close itself (usually by six months but in rare cases maybe later); if the hernia isn’t causing any problems, surgery may wait. Overall to eliminate complications I would recommend the surgery; if any section of intestine or another other structure passes through the opening, this may lead to a surgical emergency. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bebe
Chihuahua
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Umbilical hernia has gotten bigger

Hello, Dr. Turner!

My beloved female chihuahua was born with an umbilical hernia. After we brought her home at 3 months of age, we took her to 2 different vet's that both assured us that her belly button lump was not something to worry about, as they were able to push it in without any physical resistance or discomfort. She will be turning 10 years old in February, and although she has gained a little weight since her puppy years, she's not obese by any means. However, in the last couple months her hernia has noticeably grown a bit. Though we are able to press on it without any "yipes!" or "squeaks!" on her end, the change in physical appearance is concerning to us, even though it almost reverts all the way back into her belly when pressed. I should also mention that her bowel movements and eating habits are completely normal as of now. Should we take her to be seen by our local Vet?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Umbilical hernias are not a problem until they are; some dogs have them their whole lives without incident and others have emergency strangulations and require surgery at a young age, most umbilical hernias are repaired at the time of spaying. The majority of the time a hernia is just fat which passes through the opening; however, if you are noticing changes in size, shape or colour, it should be brought up with your Veterinarian either by an appointment (if you are concerned or you have noticed changes in colour or shape) or at Bebe’s next checkup. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ned
Poodle mix
9 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting and umbilical hernia.
Vomiting

Medication Used

none
No medications were prescribed

We have just bought a 9 week old Cavoodle puppy home and he has an umbilical hernia that is about the size of a pea. We did receive a letter from he breeders vet stating that this was an umbilical hernia but otherwise the pup was in good health.
We had another pup last year that became suddenly ill and passes away at about 12 weeks so we are a little paranoid about this pup being healthy. This evening he was quietly sitting on his mat when he suddenly vomited up his dinner which was dry food that didn't even seem to have been chewed and some unidentifiable mush (apologies for the descriptive). My children are now super paranoid that this is a symptom that the pup is dying because of his hernia as they have googled and it tells them this is so. Other than the one vomit, the pup is still active and playful, drinking water, and does not appear in any pain. While I know you aren't able to give a definite answer without a hands on examination, is it possible that this vomiting is unrelated to the hernia and that it may have just been a result of puppy being a greedy pig and not properly chewing his food. It did not appear to have even made it to his stomach in my opinion. It looked like a sausage of u chewed food and mush.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

A small little hernia the size of a pea would most probably be a little bit of fat that passed through the opening; if the vomiting was caused by a strangulation of the hernia you would notice a larger bulge at the belly button (umbilicus) and Ned would be in a lot of pain. Puppies may vomit for a variety of reasons, if Ned is otherwise active and happy I wouldn’t be too concerned; if the hernia grows in size, changes colour or you notice any more worrying symptoms visit your Veterinarian otherwise have the hernia corrected when you take him to be neutered. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I am impatiently waiting on a samoyed puppy which is now 1 month old. The breeder has just informed us that the puppy has a ventral hernia which has grown in size.
From the picture it seems to be a 3-4cm umbilical hernia.

The breeder promises to pay for the surgery, but I am worried about a few things.
1) With that size, I'am assuming it will probably require a mesh repair. What are approximate long term recurrence rates after umbilical hernia repair?

2) How will this affect his medical insurance, which we planned to get for him?

3) Should the breeder be asking full price for a puppy with this anomaly?

4) Even with surgical repair, how will this affect the puppy's activity/development/athleticism?

5) Is there is significant risk of chronic pain or discomfort, with or without mesh placement.


I am personally a General Surgeon and specialize in (human) hernia repair.

Thank you for your help

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Oski
Poddle mix
4 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Breathing problem, cough coming from nose
Doesnt eat as much as dogs her breed and age

My puppy is about 3 months old, and she has the Umbilical Hernias, we a trying the find a way to help get surgery but we don't have the money. What should do?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Dogs with umbilical hernias usually have them corrected at six months when spayed. As far as getting the surgery done due to financial constraints, I would speak with a local Charity Clinic or speak with your local Practice to see if they have an Angel Fund for these procedures. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

forgot to put that she is about 5 1/2 yrs old

Hi
my little coco at 10 lbs *wire hair mini dauschand* has an abcess tooth and needs her teeth cleaned. There is also a very small uncomplicated umbilical hernia from birth that is about the size of a dime. the dr wants to spay her and do the hernia repair and also the teeth cleaning and any extraction. She is on antibiotics for 14 days prior to surgery and also putting the Perio Support powder in her food daily. I am very concerned about her being under for that long of time. from my understanding the teeth cleaning can be about 45 to 75 mins depending how bad and also the extractions can be an additional 1 to 2 hrs. Isn't that a concern to have her under that long? please advice.. I am really concerned

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sheba
English Mastiff
16 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

lack of engery

i am buying a english mastiff and i was told she has a umbilical hernia would this be a problem if i wanted to breed her in 2 to 3 years i was told of this before they fly here to me also is it safe for her to fly what question do i ask i now know check the size and dogs comfort

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Ideally a dog with an umbilical hernia shouldn’t be bred since dogs with undesirable inheritable traits should be removed from the breeding pool. Dogs with hernias are still bred by people, it isn’t forbidden (depending on the rules of Clubs you may be associated with); I always say if you are going to breed a dog with a hernia, disclose the information to any potential buyers of puppies. For the flight, animals should receive a Veterinary examination before being cleared fit to fly. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My dog is a husky/shepherd/collie mix. I got her at 8 weeks old and she had a hernia on her belly button. I brought her to the vet and they said if It gets bigger or hurts her I shouldn’t be worried. She’s now 2 years old and I noticed it’s gotten slightly bigger (not by a lot but enough for me to notice) but it doesn’t bother her if I touch it. She’s a very healthy, energetic pup, we go on daily walks and she is constantly getting love. I’m not sure if I should be concerned that it grew because she seems perfectly fine! I just don’t want her to have to undergo surgery 😓

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Syrah
jack russell terrier
5 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Bulging in the groin area

Hello, I have a jack Russell terrier that is 5 weeks old. the breeder did not disclose that the dam had a congenital hernia, neither the puppy. he said that the hernia will go away on its own, but its over 2cm in the abdomen, femur area, not umbilical region. should I be concerned?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

It sounds like an inguinal hernia, which can be repaired when Syrah is neutered; but you should have your Veterinarian check it to make sure that it isn’t anything to be concerned about. Any hernia can cause problems if abdominal contents gets trapped or strangled in the opening and can be a medical emergency. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.vetary.com/dog/condition/inguinal-hernia

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Bodhisattva
Miniature Australian Shepherd
8 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Umbilical hernia

Hi, I have purchased an 8 week-old puppy from a local "backyard breeder". The dog is a Mini Australian Shepherd x Mini Blue Heeler, male, quite small. I picked him up saturday 02/18, and the following day I noticed a small umbilical hernia (approx 1cm). I contacted the breeder and she initially was nice, and referred me to a vet she uses (about 2 hrs from me), stating they could repair it for around $60. After reading about contract law as it applies to companion animal sales, I contacted her again today (02/20) to inquire how she handles these situations, and if she will cover the cost of hernia repair. She said no, and that if I wanted to return the puppy that's fine. Referring again to what I've read, I said that based on the regulations, if she would rather have me return the dog, I'm apparently entitled to refund of 115% of purchase price (my point being, it makes much more sense for her to cover the hernia repair). She did not take it that way and rescinded the offer to take back the dog out of spite and now will not respond to me.
My question is: Is this something that will likely resolve without surgical intervention? I would like to avoid any further cost in the immediate future, however I am of course concerned for the dog's health.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Small umbilical hernias usually cause no trouble and in some cases may resolve within six months of age. Generally I recommend people to have the hernia repaired at the same time as neutering to prevent repeated rounds of anaesthesia. $60 is a great price for umbilical hernia repair; contract law becomes very grey when you deal with ‘backyard enterprises’. I wouldn’t get concerned about the hernia unless it grows in size, gets warm, changes colour or it causes other symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My dog of 50days American cocker spaniel having 1inch width of harnia .. please suggest .. he is not having any pain,eating food as usually.playing n active totally. But i have a dispute in my mind that what to do for that..please suggest the same

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Gizmo
Chihuahua
8 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lump

Medication Used

None

I have a 8 month old Merle chihuahua and he has a hard lump under his sternum. He went to his checkups and it was there but the vet didn't seem to worried or actually say anything at all about it. I've researched it and hernias seem soft, his feels like a bone and it has a sharp point at the end. When I push on it not to hard obviously it doesn't seem to bother him. He has no signs of any symptoms he drinks sleeps eats normal poops and pees normal and is a super happy playful puppy. I'm not sure what that lump is doesn't seem to bother him. I have pictures also

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

It sounds like you may have found Gizmo’s xiphoid process which is a hard protrusion from the bottom (the end closest to the belly button) of the sternum. It is perfectly normal and may protrude just like in humans. I wouldn’t be concerned about it, double check with your Veterinarian at your next visit, but I would say it is the xiphoid process. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Thor
Chocolate lab
8 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Eye Discharge
Vomiting

My boyfriend has an 8 month old AKC chocolate lab. We got him at 6 weeks old from a breeder. And at a very low price because he had an umbilical hernia. I'm guessing the breeder wanted the "undesirable one" gone is why we got him so young. His hernia just continued to grow and grow and the vet agreed it was getting way too big(he was about 20lbs at the time and it was at least an inch and a half protruding, and about as round as the smaller end of a baseball bat), and it was surgically fixed right away when he was 4 months old. He was seemed fine after surgery. About 2 months ago(2 months after surgery). He has started at least once a week gets sick for no apparent reason. Sometimes up to 4 days a week(not in a row). When he gets sick, he is a little lethargic and pukes at least 3 times in a row, up to 6 times in the span of a few minutes. Sometimes just laying and chewing his rawhide/toy looks up and turns his head and projectile vomits(that has happened twice in the last month). His vomit is nothing more than what looks like very slightly discolored yellow water, with maybe a tiny bit of white foam. He also has discharge coming from both eyes almost all the time. Sometimes so bad that I have wiped a "booger" from below his eye the size of a pea. I am very concerned for this dog as my boyfriend will not take him to the vet. I can not take him because I can not lift him(he will not get in the truck without help). He is now about 70 lbs. I am also wondering if these newer "problems" are normal? Are they possibly related the the hernia he had? Can this be serious? Thank you in advance!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

The discharge from the eye may be due to allergies, irritation (like ingrowing hairs), corneal ulcers or blocked nasolacrimal duct. The vomiting may be due to numerous different causes including infection, congenital anomalies, foreign bodies, parasites, food allergies, gag reflex (if a toy irritates the back of the throat) or poisoning / toxins. If you are unable to visit a Veterinarian, I would withdraw all treats, rawhide and food and start feeding a bland diet in small regular meals with no treats etc… to calm down his stomach. The yellow, white foamy vomit is probably due to an empty stomach which is why smaller regular meals are ideal to keep some food in the stomach. Ideally, you should visit a Veterinarian just to have a general examination, but I understand your situation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cain
Great Dane
10 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

None

We have a great dane about 10 weeks right now, he has a small, pea-sized umbilical hernia that does not seem to cause any pain. However, he eats,at times, less than other dane puppies. We were looking into breeding him. Is this okay or can he not be bred?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

There is no problem breeding a dog with an umbilical hernia, just disclose this information to anyone purchasing pups sired by him. Umbilical hernias are usually non-problematic unless intestinal content is trapped and blood flow is restricted. Normally hernias are repaired at the same time as neutering, but if you plan to breed and it isn’t causing much trouble, you can just keep an eye on it. Some pups may not eat the same as the others, but as long as he is growing and isn’t turning cachectic, I wouldn’t be too concerned. These issues can be raised with your Veterinarian at a vaccination visit.  Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Daisy
Shih Tzu mix
4 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Painful abdomen

When I first got my Shih Tzu mix, about 8 weeks old, I never noticed an umbilical Hernia. Now, at 4 months, I found what looks to be a 1/4 inch umbilical hernia on her. I found this because she cried in pain when I picked her up. The bump is hard and does not push in like I have heard other people say about hernias. The bump does not feel hot to the touch but does bother her. Also, her stomach seems a bit hard and swollen maybe. Do you think this is a hernia and how would she have one now when she didn't before? Another pup in her litter also had an umbilical hernia. Should I take her to a vet asap because she was in pain or could this just go away at 6 months? Thanks so much!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

If Daisy cried when pressure was applied to the area, it may be worth having your Veterinarian check it. Umbilical hernias can occur at any time in life due to a weakness in the abdominal wall. We usually suggest to have them corrected at the same time as spaying if they aren’t causing any trouble. Again, be on the safe side and have it checked. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kane
Siberian Husky
10 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No Pain

I have a 10 month old puppy he has a Umbilical hernia it has never bugged him and I press it down and it goes down and it still doesn't hurt him he got it by his mom by pulling the Umbilical cord too much, I want to breed him with a female and I just want know if it's safe. I talked too his breeder and she's a retired vet and she said It was okay, she also said that the hernia will get away as he grows, I just want another option from a vet.
He's also doing very well he eats a lots and is a chubby little fella.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Reducible umbilical hernias are usually just fat passing through the umbilical opening; if the hernia would resolve itself it would have done so around six months of age. There should be no reason that you cannot breed a dog with an acquired umbilical hernia; obviously if you notice pain or discomfort during mating, swelling, discolouration, loss of appetite, lethargy or any other symptom visit your Veterinarian immediately. I would recommend neutering Kane after you have finished breeding with him to prevent problems with the testicles or prostate as he ages. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Arya
Mountain Cur
9 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Papules
Hernia

I have an 9 month old puppy who had a larger hernia removed along with spaying at 4 1/2 months of age.She did pop one of her stitches shortly after surgery which the vet stapled closed. Once everything was healed she has been good no bumps or issues. About 3 weeks ago where the hernia was, it seems as if it is starting to come back. She has a small bump (penny/nickel size) in that area again. Is this normal?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Recurrence of umbilical hernias is rare, but not impossible. Usually they comprise only of fat and as long as there is no involvement of intestines etc… there isn’t really anything to be concerned with which is why we usually wait until spaying in puppies to correct them. Just monitor the size of the lump and bring it to your Veterinarian’s attention at Arya next check up; if the lump increases in size, the skin changes colour, she loses her appetite exhibits pain visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you Doctor Turner.

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Doby
Australian Terrier
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia

Hi, my dog is a 9 lb 7 year old Australian Terrier rescue. He was recently neutered as part of the shelter's adoption policy and he's healed up just fine. He does, however, have a reducible umbilical hernia likely due to trauma from his previous owner. A vet has reduced it, but there is what feels like a pokey rib floating around in there; mostly its soft tissue. My question is, would it be wise to leave it alone or get it taken care of now? I ask only because he had an episode of vomiting a week ago, and I think the stress of vomiting made the hernia a little bigger, I'd estimate it at about 2x3 cm. Seems to be bothering me more than it does him. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Most umbilical hernias are nothing to worry about and many dogs live their whole lives with them without incident, the only problem is when they become complicated by the intestines passing through causing strangulation. Mostly the resultant lump is comprised of fat and can be manually manipulated back. Usually umbilical hernias are repaired during another surgery like neutering or foreign body removal; unless there seems to be some pain, discomfort or it is affecting Doby’s quality of life it can be monitored. If the hernia grows in size, changes colour, produces a pain response or you notice any gastrointestinal signs (vomiting, loss of appetite etc…) visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I just rescued my 11week old puppy from a shelter. She has already got spayed. I noticed a small lump on Pumpkin(the puppy). I thought it was just her belly button, so I researched it, and it shows many results that she has hernia. Should I be worried? She is happy, healthy, playful, and is pretty much a normal puppy.

Thank you Doctor, very much appreciated! - Jennifer

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Miss Tuffsy
Miniature Pinscher
10 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

My 10 month old miniature pinscher had an umbilical cord hernia fixed at 6 months old when she was stayed. I just now noticed what looks to be an even bigger one has appeared in almost the same exact place. Can they get a second one? Will she be ok?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Recurrence of umbilical hernias after surgical correction is rare, but they can still occur. Usually an umbilical hernia isn’t significant clinically and poses little health risk, complications occur if a loop of intestine enters through the umbilical opening where is may get strangulated. If there are no symptoms of pain, depression, loss of appetite or any other symptom, Miss Tuffsy will be OK for now but keep an eye on it and visit your Veterinarian if you notice any of those symptoms; your Veterinarian can check the hernia at Miss Tuffsy’s next check up. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Luna
Jindo/Poongsan mix
8 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Skin Lump

I have a puppy who is now 8 weeks old. She will grow up to be a medium/large sized dog. She has an umbilical hernia that is about the size of the width of my index finger. Should I be worried? She doesn't show any other symptoms that were stated, just a protruding "belly button". On average, how much more would I have to pay to repair the hernia while getting her spayed?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Simple umbilical hernia’s similar to how you describe usually resolve themselves before the puppy reaches six months of age and as long as there are no complications, there should be no reason to perform surgery before the day of spaying. If the hernia doesn’t resolve itself, as far as cost is concerned, it is dependent on the Veterinarian, some would charge up to around another $200 and some would just suture the opening closed included in the price of the spay; it is dependent on many factors. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cocoa
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
4 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Incontinence

I have a Chessie puppy who is almost 19 weeks old. She had an umbilica herna repaired by the breeder (this was not disclosed to me when I got her). I've had this puppy for almost 2 months. I noticed she had round worms (looked like spaghetti) on Sunday Sept. 18, 2016 (1 wk & 3 days ago), and got a puppy wormer at tractor supply and gave her 15mL's per her weight (30lbs). Then I called for an appointment with my vet to get her looked at and her 3rd set of shots on Tuesday (2 days after I wormed her). He went ahead and wormed her 2 days after I had (I week ago). Last evening when I got off work, I noticed she was trying to have a BM, but was unable to. She was trying so hard that she was urinating. She just kept urinating over and over and over again. Since she wasn't acting lethargic, I thought she might just be constipated so I put warm beef broth on her dinner and gave kept encouraging her to drink. She is house trained, but just kept urinating all over inside the house. This morning I woke up to see she'd urinated all over the crate and the 2 towels I'd put in there were pretty wet too. Unusual since she barks when she needs to go out and has been crate trained for about a month. I spent time with her outside this morning before work and she finally had a BM that was formed and soft about 6inches long (1/3) what she usually has, but she still just keeps urinating everywhere as she is trying to keep having a BM. What is going on???

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Most probably the umbilical hernia isn’t related to the urination problem, breeders shouldn’t correct these problems themselves; many times umbilical hernias resolve themselves within six months, if not it can be done during spaying. Your Veterinarian would have given her another worming treatment since over the counter worming medications may not be as effective as prescription medication. It is possible that the worm infestation has caused an intestinal blockage causing pain and possibly intestinal damage; excessive straining will cause urinary leakage. Visit your Veterinarian to check Cocoas abdomen to ensure that there is not blockage. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have Rajapalayam pup which is also called as miniature Dane .He's 4 months old and he have umbilical hernia I guess but my doctor told me to wait until its 7 or 8 months old . What should I do? He seems not disturbed by this and when I touch it he seems to be in no pain whatsoever

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Paris
Chihuahua
10 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures

I just got a 10 week old chihuahua about 3 days ago and the breeder showed me a umbilical hernia on her and she showed me she just pushes it back in. Well three days later it does go back in now. And it has always been the size of a pea maybe smaller. Does this mean it's not a possibility of it healing on its own?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Simple umbilical hernias involving only fat tissue with no involvement of the intestine or other organs may spontaneously resolve before six months of age. Usually if the hernia is small (less than a centimetre) and isn’t causing any pain or discomfort, we recommend to have the surgery done the same time as spaying as it is just an extra few sutures whilst closing up. If the hernia grows in size, becomes painful or you notice any other symptoms; visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Logan
Gordon Setter
9 Weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Help please. I am currently in the process of adopting my next Gordon Setter. This girl is now 9 1/2 weeks old and the pup who "chose me" when I sat in the pen with the puppies. However, I could not miss this umbilical hernia on her belly. I don't know what to do. The breeder claims that it is not an issue, can be fixed when she is spayed or just ignored as her hair will cover it. She stuck her finger in the hernia to demonstrate that there were no organs involved.
What do I do here? My 7 year old is from the same breeder so I do trust her ... BUT... We just don't need extra expenses right now.
Any advice appreciated. I need to give her my final puppy decision by Sept 1, 2016
Thanks for any help

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

I love when owners allow the pups to choose them as it builds a better bond for a life-long relationship together. It sounds like a reducible hernia. As long as the umbilical hernia is around a centimetre or so in size (or less) it may resolve itself, particularly when there is no organ involvement. If there are no complications and Logan doesn’t show any clinical signs or signs of discomfort the hernia may be monitored until spaying to see if it gets larger or if it reduces completely. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Roki
1 Month
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Skin Lesion

I have a small dog (1 month old) ,he looks very good and runs without problems, he likes to play and has no pain in his "abdominal button". he has umbilical hernia with the size around 2cm. I would like to know that if it is any possible way to help the closing the hernia by itself ? maybe pushing it with something ?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Firstly, please do not try to push it in with something as this may cause damage to the soft tissues in the umbilical area. Usually an uncomplicated hernia (soft tissue swelling with no section of intestine trapped) of less than a centimetre may close spontaneously within four to six months of age. A hernia of two centimetres is quite large especially for a small dog, however if there doesn’t seem to be any immediate health issues related to the hernia, you may wait to see if it will spontaneously resolve. If you notice any changes in your puppy like vomiting, lack of appetite, depression, pain in the umbilical area or change in size or colour of the hernia visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Stella
English Cocker Spaniel
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Skin Lump

My cocker spaniel is 10 years old and approx a year ago we noticed she suddenly had what looks like an umbilical hernia. Never suffered with this before but she has had a litter of pups. I took her straight to the vets who examined the swelling and said it was nothing to worry about, dogs get fatty lumps as they get older. I have however recently noticed a couple of lumps, one on her side and one under her armpit. Very small, feels kind of like a swollen lymph node. None of the lumps cause her any pain or discomfort, just wondered if I could get a second opinion. Thanks

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1811 Recommendations

As dogs get older they are more prone to lipomas which are accumulations of fat under the skin. Usually lipomas are not painful or warm. A simple fine needle aspirate can be performed to confirm that they are lipomas if you are looking for a definitive diagnosis. If the lumps remain small and don’t affect her movement or behaviour they can be just monitored for changes in size. If your dog develops any other symptoms, the lumps change in size or become obstructive visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Leo
German Shepherd
1 Year
Moderate
Has Symptoms
Normal
My dog was neutered about a month ago and had an umbilical hernia removed at the same time. The scrotum has completely healed and looks fine but I do notice that his hernia scar is still very raised and has turned black. Is this normal?