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What is Drug Poisoning?

Drug poisoning is a common problem for dogs and it may occur in a variety of ways. Any dose of a medication designed for humans, whether prescribed or over the counter, can have adverse effects in a dog due to lower body weight and differences in metabolism. An overdose of a medication that was prescribed by the veterinarian for your dog can also cause poisoning. Poisoning may occur through the misguided intentions of an owner (such as giving a dog an over the counter pain medication designed for humans), or accidental ingestion from a bottle left open or a lid chewed off by your dog. Many pills are sweet tasting and your dog may see them as a treat. Both situations can have serious consequences and your dog will need immediate treatment by a veterinarian. Mild cases are reversible, but severe overdose can cause long term damage or death.

Many different drugs can cause poisoning in dogs when they are not given as prescribed. This is especially true of medications that were intended for humans. Veterinarians define medication overdose in dogs as drug poisoning. Depending on the drug and the amount ingested, this can cause serious illness and even death.

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Symptoms of Drug Poisoning in Dogs

Different symptoms can be present depending on the medication in question. These are some of the most common signs of drug poisoning in dogs. You should take your dog to a veterinarian immediately if you think poisoning is a possibility.

  • Vomiting
  • Drooling or excessive salivation
  • Weakness
  • Lack of coordination
  • Tremors
  • Disorientation
  • Frequent urination
  • Excessive thirst
  • Agitation
  • Irregular heartbeat (very rapid or too slow)
  • Low blood pressure
  • Pale mucous membranes
  • Lethargy
  • Depressed breathing
  • Seizures
  • Stupor and coma

Types

There are two situations which lead to drug poisoning in dogs.

  • Overdose of a prescribed medication
  • Any dose of a human medication

Accidental and intentional overdose is possible in either of these situations. If a dog gains access to the medication accidentally, a more severe overdose is likely to occur.

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Causes of Drug Poisoning in Dogs

These are some of the common drugs that could cause poisoning in your dog.

NSAID’s

  • Aspirin
  • Tylenol
  • Ibuprofen/Advil
  • Naproxen/Aleve/Motrin

Antidepressants, seizure and anxiety medication

  • Benzodiazepines (diazepam and lorazepam among others)
  • Barbiturates
  • Serotonin reuptake inhibitors
  • Tricyclic antidepressants 

Other Sleep aids

ADD/ADHD medication

  • Ritalin
  • AdderallBirth control pills

Birth control pills

Heart  and blood pressure medication

  •  Calcium channel blocker
  • BETA blockers
  • ACE inhibitors

Medications to lower cholesterol

  •  Lipitor
  • Zocor
  • Crestor

Diuretics

Muscle relaxants

Some topical agents

  •  5 fluorouracil – used to treat skin cancer
  • Calcipotriene – psoriasis medicine

Chemotherapy Drugs

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Diagnosis of Drug Poisoning in Dogs

If you know what drug your dog has been exposed to, this will help considerably with the diagnosis. Bring along the bottle containing the medication you think your dog ingested so that the veterinarian can check the exact ingredients and dosage. It’s also extremely helpful to know the exact time that the poisoning took place. If you didn’t actually see your dog ingest the drug, it’s important to note when symptoms became apparent, as well as the exact nature and severity of the symptoms.

The veterinarian will examine your dog for vital signs, especially blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature. Bloodwork will often be done to check blood oxygen levels and ascertain the degree of the toxicity. Urine tests can also help to determine this. Many medications can cause kidney or liver failure, so additional tests may be done to determine the functionality of these systems.

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Treatment of Drug Poisoning in Dogs

If you don’t have immediate access to a veterinarian, calling a poison control hotline for dogs can be a helpful first treatment. Describe the details to the operator, including what drug you think your dog ingested as well as how much and when the poisoning took place. With some drugs, the operator may advise you to induce vomiting by giving your dog hydrogen peroxide with milk or through an eye-dropper. Follow any instructions you are given exactly and get your dog to an emergency treatment facility as soon as possible.

For poisoning that occurred recently, the veterinarian will induce vomiting or have your dog’s stomach pumped to limit further absorption. Activated charcoal is often given if the poisoning occurred within the last few hours. This medication will bind to the drug in your dog’s gastrointestinal tract and help to prevent it from being absorbed. Drugs which have a delayed release may need several doses of charcoal administered over a longer period of time.

Fluids are given in almost all cases of drug poisoning. This will help to maintain blood pressure, as well as diluting the drug and flushing it out of the system faster. Depending on the type of drug that was ingested, medications may be given to support heart or respiratory function.  Central nervous system symptoms such as seizures, tremors, or excessive agitation will also need to be controlled. Your dog will need to stay in a veterinary hospital overnight at the very least, and probably for several days, to ensure that all the systems have returned to normal. Vital signs will be monitored regularly and treatment will be adjusted to control the symptoms until the drug is completely flushed out. The veterinarian will try to treat any damage that has occurred through the poisoning.

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Recovery of Drug Poisoning in Dogs

Recovery will depend on the drug, the amount that was ingested, and the immediacy of treatment. Some dogs can recover from even very severe overdoses if they get to the veterinarian right away. Cases where the poisoning was not discovered until later or the cause is unknown are much harder to treat. Your dog’s prognosis will depend on the diagnoses of a veterinarian.

Prevention of drug poisoning is the best form of management. Always act sensibly with your dog’s medications: only give the prescribed dose and avoid giving anything that was designed for humans. Other safeguards include keeping medications in a locked cabinet, or on a high shelf which your dog cannot reach. Don’t leave bottle or tubes lying around even if they are sealed. Many dogs can easily chew through a plastic bottle and may even see it as a new toy.

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Drug Poisoning Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$800

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Drug Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Ask a Vet

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morkie

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ten years

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Unknown severity

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2 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

I was advised to give my dog 1/2 tablet of 10mg pepcid. I read it wrong and gave her 1 full 10mg tablet. Will she be ok? It's been an hour and no adverse signs.

Feb. 19, 2021

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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2 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Pepcid is a safe medication to give generally, and it is difficult to overdose. That one time dosage increase should not cause any problems.

Feb. 19, 2021

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shipoo

dog-age-icon

Three Months

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Unknown severity

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4 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

No symptoms. Gave after her spay and hernia repair. Bottle said 1/2 tablet, 12.5 mg, every 24 hrs. Husband and I both gave. Oh no! We didn't mean to do this! She is fine, so far. Gave her this about 4pm

Jan. 21, 2021

Owner

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Dr. Maureen M. DVM

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4 Recommendations

Hi, Please observe her for the next 24 hours and watch out for vomiting or diarrhea. Otherwise please give her the next dose as prescribed. In case of any signs of poisoning please rush her to the vet.

Jan. 21, 2021

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German Shepherd

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Three Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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2 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

N/A

Dog ate almost full bottle of his steroid medication. Don't know the name. I'm pretty sitting at she's on the plane ride home

Oct. 26, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Gina U. DVM

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2 Recommendations

Hello For any type of overdose or toxin ingestion, your pet should be taken to a veterinarian immediately for an exam. They may want to induce vomiting and run some diagnostic tests to see if the body has been affected from the higher amounts of steroids. Good luck.

Oct. 26, 2020

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Lab/Australian shepard

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9 weeks

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Unknown severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

None Yet

My puppy got ahold of my pit Bull ear medication drop mometamax 15g it has small puncture holes in it and a bit larger bite mark in it where it’s leaking out I don’t know how much she got will it hurt her to ingest it

Sept. 27, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I am sorry for the delay, this platform is not set up for urgent emails. I hope that your puppy is okay, I would imagine that medication may have given her some vomiting or diarrhea if she ate very much of it.

Oct. 10, 2020

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Beagle

dog-age-icon

Two Years

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Unknown severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Redness

He looks drugged up but we checked the hosue and he hasn't ate any pills. He looks very tired and his puples are very dialated. The under eylid is halfway across eye.

Sept. 27, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Since I cannot see your pet, it would be best to have them seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get treatment for your pet.

Oct. 13, 2020

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#1. Sharon #2. Ozzy

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Pit-Bull

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1 Year

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Not Responding
Really Sleepy
8 Week Pit-Bull Keeps Shaking

I have two pit-bulls. I accidentally dropped a 500 milligram acetaminophen and I guess the dogs found it the next day the bigger pit-bull I guess he tried to eat it and left about half and the little pit-bull ate the rest I am really scared considering the little pit-bull is 8-weeks old. This is scary because my mom will not believe me.

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Chewy

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Chiweenie fiest

dog-age-icon

2 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Weakness

My dog chewy got ahold of my Theraflu night time. Maybe within the last hour. Idk how much he ingeated. And I have 3 more dogs that where there when he done it.

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Ozzy

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Border Collie

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5 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Vomiting
Hyperactivity
Anxiety
Confused
Unsettled
Extreme Hyperact

Our doggy found the medicine box while we’re out and ingested paracetamol (3 tablets, about 600mg) along with some homeopathic (plant-based) cough tablets (3 of them) and a couple of charcoal pills. We took him to the vet maximum 1.30- 2 hours after he’d ingested them and the vets have taken blood tests, treatment is with IV fluids and he’s staying for observation. Today we’ve been told that his tests have come out okay, but when seeing our pup he’s just so nervous and unresponsivE it’s mental. We’re so worried. Please, let me know if anyone has experienced anything similar.

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Loki

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German Mix

dog-age-icon

5 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Lethargy
Vomiting
Salivation
Lack Of Appetite

My dog got diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and immune mediated allegric reaction. He was applied a lotion for the dermatitis on his skin and was prescribed keflex and evion. Ever since I started the medication he vomitted and lost all his weight. I took him to the doctor they said that the medications were no problem he might've licked the lotion which is called I guess Alumina Lotion. Any help please.

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Diego

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German Shorthaired Pointer Chocolate Lab Mix

dog-age-icon

4 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

None

My dog Diego ate 55 Rimadyl (for dogs) medication. We took him to the vet 30 minutes - 2 hours after he ingested the pills. He showed no symptoms. Upon immediately arriving, the vet made him vomit, but they could not find Rimadyl in his vomit (but I am sure he ate the Rimadyl). They are currently treating him with activated charcoal and an IV fluid flush. Any word on his possible prognosis? The vets do not know but will not give us an estimate.

Drug Poisoning Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$800

Protect yourself and your pet. Compare top pet insurance plans.

Compare Pet Insurance & Wellness Plans

Save up to $273 per year

Compare plans
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