Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus Average Cost

From 51 quotes ranging from $300 - 2,500

Average Cost

$1,000

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What are Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus?

The large intestine’s lower section is known as the rectum, and this section stores the waste from the colon before it passes out of the body through the opening called the anus. The anal canal is lined by several layers of skin and muscle that help with the contracting and expanding of this canal as waste is preparing to leave the body. Protrusion of the rectum and anus in dogs occurs when the dog’s rectum, either a few layers or all of the layers, drop down and extend outside of the anal opening. Also known as rectal prolapse, it looks as if the dog has a hard, fleshy, tube coming out (yet still attached to) of his anus. Any type of mass, either cylinder shaped or a large piece of skin that protrudes out of the anus needs to be examined by a veterinarian. Other parts of the intestine can drop down as well, so having a medical professional examine this condition as soon as possible is necessary.

Protrusion of the rectum and anus in dogs transpires from the rectal layers, all or in part, dropping down and extending outside the opening of the anus. There are many causes for this condition, ranging from parastic invasion to disorders of the digestive system.

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Symptoms of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Dogs

If your dog has a prolapsed rectum, he may exhibit specific symptoms. Symptoms can include:

  • Dragging his bottom along the floor
  • Licking the area
  • Exposed tissue extending out of the anus
  • An irritable demeanor
  • Straining to defecate

Types

If your dog has rectal prolapse and requires surgery, there are three types of surgical procedures that are performed. The surgical procedure depends on the severity of the rectal prolapse. Surgical types are:

  • Perianal purse string suture
  • Colpoplexy
  • Rectal resection

Causes of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Dogs

This disorder most likely can occur in younger dogs, although dogs of all ages can be affected. There are a variety of causes of this disorder. Causes can include:

  • Perineal hernia
  • Diarrhea that occurs often
  • Constipation that occurs often
  • Urinary disease
  • Intestinal disease
  • Anorectal disease
  • Digestive disorders
  • Gastrointestinal parasites

Diagnosis of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Dogs

Once you notice the symptoms and take your dog to the veterinarian, the veterinarian will do a thorough examination. He may order specific laboratory tests to determine any underlying disorders, such as gastrointestinal parasites, digestive disorders, or other diseases. Blood work, a biochemistry profile, and urinalysis will be given, as well as any ultrasound methods if the veterinarian feels they are necessary to further confirm a diagnosis.

A probe will be inserted into or alongside the inner rectal area to identify the type of tissue, either rectal tissue or anal tissue, that is protruding from the anus. Once this is determined, he will run specific tests to determine the underlying cause for the prolapse, such as from any parasites in the gastrointestinal tract. Imaging of the abdomen, blood tests, and testing of the dog’s stools will be performed. 

Treatment of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Dogs

Once the underlying condition, if any, is found the veterinarian will make a decision concerning treatment. Treatment methods can vary depending on the condition of the dog and the severity of the prolapse.

Surgery

The medical professional will then determine method of treatment, such as surgery, if needed. This may need to happen in extreme cases and if the prolapse is within the upper and inner rectal canal. The dog will need to have anesthesia for this surgery, which involves repairing the prolapse. This invasive or partially invasive surgery may require hospitalization and stitches, so when the dog is released he will have to be closely monitored. 

Medication

Rather than surgery, as in mild cases, the veterinarian may apply a topical medication to help relieve the swelling. He may massage the area to help reduce the swelling and be able to manually put the tissue back into its proper place. This will also require stitching, so the dog will have to have a form of anesthesia to reduce any pain.

Recovery of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Dogs

Once your dog has been treated, the veterinarian may prescribe stool softeners or a special diet to allow the area to properly heal. It is important to keep all follow-up appointments with the veterinarian and to follow the instructions given for any at-home care. It is important to contact the veterinarian if you see any unusual signs or symptoms, such as consistent diarrhea or any signs of your companion not feeling well. The prognosis of the protrusion of rectum and anus in dogs is generally good, but it also depends on the underlying condition your dog may have. If you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to ask your medical professional.

Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Lucky
Rat Terrier
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

we have had our dog for 11 years now and he just started showin these symptoms: Straining while pooping, licks a red, irritable protrusion from anus. Pees and poops in the house now. He has had less energy and more clingy to me. Does he have this condition?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
It is possible from you description that Lucky has a small prolapse causing difficulty whilst defecating and causing him to lick his anus; I would suggest increasing his fibre intake by feeding something like plain canned pumpkin to make the stool softer. A visit to your Veterinarian would be best to evaluate the severity and to determine if a pursestring suture is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tillie
Labrador Retriever
6 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

My 6 month old puppy had diarrhea yesterday afternoon, and this morning. I fed her a small meal, and then this morning we started on Chicken and rice. I do not know what caused the upset tummy. Now when she walks her anus appears to be open slightly (about a pencil’s width, a little smaller). She does not seem to be running a fever. She definitely has not lost her appetite, she is playing with her big brother, and she is drinking plenty of water.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
It is possible that Tillie’s anus is a little bit sensitive from the diarrhoea, I would suggest to keep an eye on it and see how she goes over the weekend. Check her anus for any leakage or damage, if there is no improvement over the weekend visit your Veterinarian on Monday. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Leeko
Papillon
6 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Bleeding from butt
During defecation bleeding
Something coming out during defecation

Medication Used

Dewormer

I'm not sure if this is the right type of issue my dog has. But during defecation he bleeds. It's fresh blood as when he returns inside the house I have to clean his bottom as blood will drip. Also at times during defecation something starts to come out as he is defecating as innotice something sticking out. I do grab a tissue with warm water to clean it and notice it wants to come out as my dog pushes out. I did try to pull it but it was tough. It felt like rubbery, soft, and dark color. As I try to pull it my dog retracts it back into his anus. Like if it was a poop to come out but went back inside. He is active happy and playful. He eats as I changed his food to a better healthier food. He sometimes will become discomfort but not frequently. He did go to the vet and did a anal expression & exam of his rectum. I wasn't able to get more testing as it was very expensive. But the the doctor requested medication as a dewormer and another form of medication to stop the bleeding. I wasn't sure to give him the medication it without having an fecal exam. Please if there is any advice or help I can use to help my pet. He is a 6 year old papillon.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

There are a few possible causes for what you are seeing and feeling; please do not pull on the protruding object as this may be painful and could cause severe complications. Polyps and other types of growths are what you are probably seeing and feeling but further examination would be needed to confirm what is present as well as making a treatment plan (surgery). To help with the straining you could feed some plain canned pumpkin or give some stool softeners so that Leeko isn’t straining whilst defecating; but ideally you should return to your Veterinarian for a more comprehensive examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My dog had puppies, and they are now 2 months old, and one of them had poop stuck in his anus, when we managed to get it off him, his anus was protruding a little.

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Dog
Toy Poodle
15 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

rectal prolapse

I have a 15 year old toy poodle who has chronic rectal prolapse symptoms. The first time it happened was 10 years ago. He was treated with a purse string and it seemed to solve the problem. The symptoms reoccurred just recently. Each time, he was treated with a purse string, and he was fine for about 4-5 months. He recently had a purse string procedure (third one in a year and a half) , and the problem occurred the very next day after his purse string was removed when he pooped. He is not constipated, straining or having any diarrhea issues. Is invasive surgery his only option?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

If there is no excessive straining or signs of constipation, stool softeners may help (with or without purse string suture); however, for a more permanent fix, you would be looking at colopexy which is quite an invasive surgery and would need to be seriously considered in a dog of fifteen years old. Given his age, I would be more tempted to go the medical management route of stool softeners and purse string sutures; but you should discuss this with your Veterinarian as each dog’s health is individual and he may tolerate the surgery well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

We had this pet named ashley. We bought her when she was 2months old and now she's turning 3months old, but she has never been vaccinated. And now she is suffering from rectal prolapse (just based on my reasearch on how it looks like). I just want to know the pecentage of her survival if she will undergo on a surgery. ( I REALLY WANT HER TO BE ALIVE. <3)

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Josie
Australian Shepherd
8 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Bloody poop

my dog is a ausie 8 yrs old. she has been bleeding when pooping. been to vet twice, each time more antibiotics, probiotics and steroids. still bleeding. this morning I noticed something sticking out of her rectum. no more money to take her to the vet.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Blood whilst defecating and something protruding from the rectum would be consistent with rectal polyps or some other type of mass like a tumour; without a hands on examination I cannot tell you what it is or your treatment options, I would recommend returning to your Veterinarian regardless of cost and until then feed a wet diet with canned pumpkin to give some fibre to make the stool more soft to make defecation slightly easier. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

thank you very much Dr. Turner. I will try the canned pumpkin. I appreciate you replying back
Donna

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Blake
Chihuahua/ Rat Terrier
14 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

cyst

Medication Used

none

My dog is 14 years old. He has a cyst and it is starting to bulge near the left side of the anul. The vet recommend surgery. It is expensive. I do love my dog. But is 14 years old too old to have that surgery? Not sure how he will come out of it. Really wondering....

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

I understand your concern regarding surgery; however there is a catch 22 situation here where there is a risk related to the surgery and there is a risk the cyst (in some cases) may grow to a point where it causes problems with defecation. Whilst surgery is risky in older dogs (determined by either over seven years old or dogs which have passed 75% of their expected lifespan), these risks may be mitigated by thorough blood testing prior to surgery and the use of modern inhalation anaesthetics which are easily controlled and are safer than injectable anaesthetics or older inhalation anaesthetics (halothane). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Karma
American bully
3 Months
Fair condition
2 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Redness on bum

So I just got a new puppy and she has rectal prolapse 2 times since I got her. I believe that the surgery is a very big possibility. But I am afraid of the risk. How high would you say the risk is? After the surgery.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Surgery risk isn’t very high, the biggest complication is the possibility of faecal incontinence if too much of the rectum is removed (depending on the procedure used). Your Veterinarian may replace the rectum and place a purse string suture around the anus to keep it in place and will place Karma on stool softeners. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Blackie
German Shepherd long haired chihuahua
8 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Butt scooting, licking and protrusion near anus

It appears as though my dog has recital prolapse. I don't have money or pet insurance, and I can't borrow from anyone. What should I do? He has a red cylindrical flesh hanging from his rectum. I put a warm compress on it today when I noticed it. The butt scooting has been going on about every other day for a week now.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Rectal prolapse as you have described are not a condition that can be treated or managed at home long term; regardless of cost, you would need to have it surgically corrected. Depending on the severity a duel approach from the abdomen and anus maybe required to correct the prolapse; there is a risk of permanent faecal incontinence after surgery. Until surgery is performed, stool softeners will help with the passage of faeces through the prolapse and regular cleaning and removal of faecal matter. Please have your Veterinarian evaluate Blackie’s prolapse without delay so at least medical management and dietary steps are being taken. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Misty
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Defecate
Vomiting

My pit bull has rectal prolapse caused by straining from diarrhea. It is reddish/pink in color as blood is visible. We have treated her for worms. Without extra money for a surgery, are there alternative methods that can be taken to decrease swelling and reverse the protrusion? Without surgery what is her chance of survival? I can tell that it's very discomforting for her. She's been this way for about 3 days.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

The type and length of the prolapse would determine the type of treatment (almost always surgical) given; even in simple cases, the anus has sutures (stitches) placed around it to prevent the prolapse from recurring, in some cases extensive surgery may be required to secure the rectum or intestine in place to prevent recurrence. Lubrication gels with numbing agents used for manual reduction almost always lead to complications and recurrence. Although I understand your financial situation, I would urge you to visit your Veterinarian for surgery to prevent complications and to make Misty comfortable. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Don't you get the fact that if through no fault of the oner, there are no fnancses. Had plenty of income when we got our dog, lost ability to work due to serious illness. We love our baby, but isn't any Vet or clinic willing to help and make some kind of payment arrangements or reduce fees in this case. After all, "first due no harm", should everything be about money???

I just bought a puppy and wasn't told he'd had surgery for this. I just found out and am doing research. If the dog has had surgery for this, can he now live a normal healthy life with no issues like this again or should I prepare and continue to look for signs of him prolapsing again?

He's such a sweet dog, I don't really want to return him for a refund... but we move a lot because of our profession and I'm not sure I can take care of a dog with serious health problems so young in his life. He's only 4 months old now.

this type of surgery would I have to have a vet that specializes in prolapse rectal surgery for my dog

My 2.5 yr old dog did this for the first time at the vet recently. He was scard, sh*t, and i didn't even realize it until the vet asked me about it. He took my dog back to push it in but it actually went back in by itself before he had to. Is it possible for it just to happen occasionally or when he's scared and poops? Ugh

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