Vitamin D Poisoning Average Cost

From 31 quotes ranging from $500 - 7,500

Average Cost

$2,500

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What is Vitamin D Poisoning?

Symptoms of Vitamin D poisoning typically appear 12 to 24 hours after initial ingestion, although they can appear as much as 72 hours after ingestion. In a dog with vitamin D poisoning, calcium, and phosphorous levels rise, affecting the kidneys, heart, gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system. In extreme cases or if left untreated, dogs can experience acute renal failure, coma, and death.

Vitamin D is fat-soluble and regulates dog’s calcium and phosphorous levels, influencing nerve and muscle control. When consumed at excessive levels, Vitamin D poisoning causes an electrolyte abnormality known as hypercalcemia.

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Symptoms of Vitamin D Poisoning in Dogs

  • Vomiting
  • Excessive drooling
  • Abdominal pain
  • Muscle tremors
  • Seizures
  • Weakness
  • Depression
  • Constipation
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased thirst
  • Increased urination
  • Blood in vomit
  • Loss of weight
  • Tarry feces that contains blood

Causes of Vitamin D Poisoning in Dogs

The most common cause of vitamin D poisoning is the accidental ingestion of certain chemicals used to kill rodents that contain cholecalciferol, or vitamin D3. Poisoning may also be a result of chronic dietary over-supplementation of vitamin D (a risk if you are supplementing vitamin D to treat your dog’s hypoparathyroidism), accidental ingestion of vitamin D tablets or chews. If you notice that your dog has consumed chemicals containing vitamin D it's important to schedule a veterinarian visit as soon as possible. Do not wait to take a "wait-and-see" approach with symptom onset.

Diagnosis of Vitamin D Poisoning in Dogs

As the symptoms of vitamin D poisoning overlap with many other conditions, it is important to disclose details about your dog’s diet, any supplements you have been adding, and if your dog may have been able to access rodenticides or another source of vitamin D recently. Being able to determine that vitamin D poisoning is causing your dog’s symptoms will aid in a swift recovery.

The veterinarian will conduct a complete physical examination, and conduct a complete blood count, which checks for abnormalities in red and white blood cell count. Additionally, a blood biochemistry profile will measure levels of calcium and phosphorous, elevated levels of which indicate vitamin D poisoning. The biochemistry profile may also show lower than normal levels of potassium and an accumulation of nitrogenous waste products, as well as low levels of albumin and high levels of certain liver enzymes. A urinalysis will be conducted to measure levels of proteins and glucose, which, if elevated, will help confirm the diagnosis. In some cases, an echocardiogram will measure your dog’s heartbeat, as some dogs suffering from vitamin D poisoning have slowed heartbeats.

Treatment of Vitamin D Poisoning in Dogs

If your dog has recently ingested the substance at the time you seek treatment, the veterinarian will induce vomiting and administer a drug that binds to the vitamin D in order to prevent further absorption. However, if the substance has already been fully metabolized, the first goal of treatment will be to stabilize your dog if necessary, as in the case of a dog suffering seizures. Your dog will be placed on an IV in order to stay hydrated and balance electrolyte levels. Hydration helps to encourage the excretion of excess calcium through urine.

The veterinarian will monitor calcium and phosphorus levels frequently until they have stabilized enough to take your dog off of the IV. After this, the veterinarian will likely want to monitor your dog’s levels daily for several days to avoid renal failure. In some cases, aluminum hydroxide, or other phosphate binders will be given to lower the phosphate levels.

Other treatments include the administration of anti-seizure medication, antibiotics in the case of secondary bacterial infections that may occur as a result of vitamin D poisoning, and/or blood transfusion in the case of severe anemia.

Recovery of Vitamin D Poisoning in Dogs

The prognosis for vitamin D poisoning depends upon if and when treatment is sought; however, if treatment occurs early, the prognosis is very good. Your day may require prolonged hospitalization and monitoring. Even after your dog is released to outpatient care, you may have to return to your veterinarian regularly in order to monitor progress. Your pet needs to be monitored for potential organ calcification, caused by the buildup of calcium in body tissues, which hardens and can disrupt bodily functions.

Vitamin D Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Chico
Italian Greyhound
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

I have a 13lb Iggy Chihuahua mix who MAY have consumed a 5000IU softgel vitamin D (if he did - he busted it upon eating it). My husband dropped our vitamins on the floor and we immediately picked them up or so we thought. My pup came over "chewing" something and now I am not sure if it was a piece of dog food or a Vita D softgel. I gave a bit of diluted peroxide to try to induce vomiting but nothing yet. This all happened within the hour. Is there anything else I can or should do? What levels or how many pills would I need to worry about for toxicity? I am worried as my vet does not have a Dr. in Saturday and is closed Sunday with the nearest ER being over an hour away.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
A 5,000IU vitamin D capsule is equivalent to 0.125mg which means that Chico consumed around 0.02mg/kg which thankfully isn’t a toxic dose; keep an eye on Chico, but visit a Veterinarian if you have any concerns. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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sadie
Vizsla
10 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Confused

My 10 yr old Vizsla may have eaten some 500 iu d3 vitamin capsules that silled on the floor.We've been to 2 vets with no answers for her dizziness and seizures.she's had 2 seizures 12 hours apart and has never had a seizure before.She's been lethargic and confused.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1099 Recommendations
Vitamin D3 can be toxic in large quantities, and may cause kidney failure. Sadie may need to be hospitalized, and needs to have her kidney function monitored for dysfunction. I hope that she is okay.

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Rex
pitbull
9 Months
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

no symptoms

My 60lb pitbull ate some vitamin D 2000iu pill accidentally. I got him to throw up about 15 to 20 minutes after he ate them. Will he be ok? I don't know how many he ate because the bottle fell on the floor.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
If you induced vomiting early enough, little should have been absorbed; keep an eye out for any symptoms listed on this page but a high quantity of vitamin D3 is required for toxicity. Keep a close eye over the next 24 hours, but it you have any concerns you should visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/toxicities-from-human-drugs/multivitamins-and-iron-toxicity

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max
puggle teddy bear
8 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

N/A

My 22 lbs dog ate 22 vitamin d2 pills that are 50,000IU each. I have taken him to the vet and vet has done fluids twice a day for 4 days then once a day, his calcium levels in his blood got as high as 15.6 for a day but are now down to 12.1. The vet also gavce prednisone and other meds I can't remember. I am asking to know if my dog is going to be ok. He has not been throwing up or had diaherra, he is not as playful but i can still get him to play he has been playful a little more since his level went down. He is peeing alot but vet said he would becasue of the fluids. He does eat just not that much not as much as he used to

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
Unfortunately I do not have any toxicology data on vitamin D2, plenty on vitamin D3; I am not sure how much is considered toxic or what an acceptable dose is. I would recommend you call the Pet Poison Helpline as they will have toxicology data on vitamin D2 and would be able to advise you. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com

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Java
Chihuahua
13 Weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

I have a 13 week old, 4.5 pound Chihuahua. He may have consumed a 400 iu softgel supplement. I am not sure he did but am worried. I spilled them, immediately got them up, but then later he was chewing on something he had "found", which is not uncommon. He chews EVERYTHING. He isn't showing any signs or symptoms but this says not to wait for signs. He is my very first Chi, after having animals all my life, and has stolen my heart already so I do not want to take any chances. Thank you from Java and I.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
If you noticed Java eating something you should have induced vomiting immediately and administered activated charcoal regardless of what suspicious item Java may have consumed. A single capsule of 400IU of vitamin D shouldn’t cause symptoms of toxicity but you should monitor Java for any symptoms listed on this page. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Margie
Malti-Poo
7 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

We recently moved to rainy, cloudy Seattle and were curious about Vitamin D dog treats to avoid depression, like in humans. After reading about Vitamin D poisoning, I am wondering if there are no such treats because there is no such sun-related depression like humans can experience. Is this true? Should I not worry about keeping Vitamin D levels up for my dog?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
Humans and many animals synthesise vitamin D but dogs get their vitamin D from dietary sources; so as long as Margie has a well balanced commercial diet suitable for her breed and size I wouldn’t worry about vitamin D deficiency affecting her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Natasha
Dauschund mix
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

My 7 lb dog may have ingested one of my 50,000 iu Vitamin D pills. This would have happened 5-7 hours ago and she isn’t showing any symptoms, but I’m worried bc everything I’ve read has said the symptoms can be much later. Our vet is closed but we do have a local emergency vet. I feel bad putting her through all this if she didn’t ingest it, but I don’t want to take a chance and have it be serious.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
A 50,000IU tablet of vitamin D is around 1.25mg; a dog Natasha’s size should have no more than 0.35mg, any amount over that would require emergency care. If ingestion was over five hours ago, inducing vomiting would not help; visit your Veterinarian or Emergency Veterinarian for evaluation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/rodenticide-poisoning/cholecalciferol

What about a dog 13lbs ingesting 5000IU? I have tried to figure the math for this to convert to MG but got nowhere fast. I hope Natasha is okay!

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Rosie
Jack Russell Terrier Chihuhua
7 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None yet

My dog ( a jack Russell chihuahua, about 7 pounds) consumed a Vitamin D3 1000IU pill. Should I be concerned? Shes about 7 months old and is acting fine, but it's only been 30 minutes since consumption

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations
I wouldn’t be worried about the ingestion of a single vitamin D3 tablet as the toxic dose of vitamin D3 in dogs is considered to the 10,000IU/lb. I will also note that symptoms of vitamin D3 toxicity will normally present after 18-36 hours and not immediately, but again a single tablet isn’t anything to be concerned about. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/rodenticide-poisoning/cholecalciferol

How did your pup do after the vitamin D accident? I have a 4 pound chi who might have eaten one of my vit d softgels.

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Hershey
Labrador Retriever
3 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Non existent yet

My dog ate approx 600 gel caps of vit d3 2000 iu win in hold with poison control while st the vets office I don't know what to do she is acting completely normal I don't know what time she ate them

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2514 Recommendations

Symptoms of vitamin D3 poisoning usually take 18 to 36 hours to present with symptoms of loss of appetite, increase in drinking and urination as well as lethargy. Treatment consists of induction of vomiting followed by activated charcoal (your Veterinarian may perform a gastric lavage) with or without cholestyramine. Poison Helplines will have more information and would be able to alert your Veterinarian to additional problems due to any specific additional ingredients for certain brands. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/rodenticide-poisoning/cholecalciferol

Wish I knew what size dog and what happened because 600 soft gels at 2,000iu each is 1,200,000iu my 22 lbs dog ate 22 vitamin d2 soft gels each 50,000iu which equals 1,100,000. That is close to how much your dog got.

What happened to your dog my puppy just got a hold of a 2000 iu vitamin D I got it away but her tooth had busted the capsule in her mouth im worried

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