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What is Aggressive at Night?

Aggression can be unnerving for any dog owner, regardless of the time of day. Barking, lunging, growling, and biting can become intense and scary if your dog becomes nervous. But if your dog becomes more aggressive when the sun goes down, it may be a sign that something may be wrong. Even peaceful and loving dogs can have issues that can cause nighttime aggression, even towards family that they are very familiar with. Keeping a record of the incidences of aggression, along with any activities or triggers that may have caused them, can help both you and your veterinarian determine why this might be happening. Reasons can include: 

  • Anxiety 
  • Protection aggression
  • Serotonin 
  • Vision loss
  • Hearing loss 
  • Cognitive dysfunction 
  • Medication

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Why Aggressive at Night Occurs in Dogs

Your dog may be exhibiting aggression at night due to various conditions.

Anxiety 

Anxiety can come in many forms. Fears and phobias can result from a traumatic event or situation that your dog remembers and may associate with nighttime, darkness, or even with something that occurs in your particular household in the evening. If your dog shows signs of anxious and nervous behavior at night, he may be afraid of something, and may lash out aggressively to unknowing family members. 

Protection Aggression

Protection aggression is a territorial behavior, and is often shown towards people or animals that are viewed as a threat to the property. It may be that your dog is more nervous at night, or that due to the quiet, he hears perceived threats more easily. Your dog may be on alert for predators, a real fear in the wild, or may be trying to do his duty and protect his family. 

Serotonin 

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that helps to regulate emotions and the sleep cycle. If serotonin levels are abnormal, it can disrupt and even reverse the sleep-wake cycle, causing your dog to more awake and alert during the night. If you’ve noticed your dog sleeping more during the day, and completely awake at night, this may be what’s going on. Certain medications have been implicated in causing an excess of serotonin, which can result in aggressive behaviors, vocalization, muscle twitching, and even seizures.

Vision Loss

Dogs can experience a decrease in eyesight that can lead to blindness due to age, hereditary disorders, infections, or glaucoma. If your dog is having trouble seeing, he may become more anxious at night when it is already harder to see. Signs this may be an issue for your dog can include confusion in new or changed environments, clumsiness, disorientation, and bumping into objects. He may also have certain telltale signs that are visible in his eyes, such as squinting, tearing, reddened eyes, a weak blink response, and light avoidance. 

Hearing Loss 

Your canine companion can also experience partial or total hearing loss than can be temporary or permanent. This can also occur from age, or from an infection, waxy build-up, inflammation, tumor, or obstruction by a foreign object. A clear sign that your dog is experiencing a loss of hearing is a lack of response to his name, commands, clapping, or other noises. He may not even hear you enter the room, which can cause anxiousness or aggression if startled. 

Cognitive Dysfunction

As dogs age, they can develop dementia or cognitive dysfunction. This can affect everything from when your dog sleeps, to recognizing people or his environment. His sleep cycles may become disrupted, he may become lost in the house, and he may become increasingly nervous or on alert. Aggression during these periods is a signal that your dog is confused and possibly scared. Signs your dog may be experiencing cognitive dysfunction can also include an increase in vocalization, aimless wandering, staring at a wall or an object for a length of time, disorientation, and changes in appetite and social interactions. 

Medication

Certain prescription medications have the potential to cause aggression, serotonin syndrome, or even seizures in dogs. Most of these medications are generally prescribed for behavioral issues, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and MAOIs. Other drugs include certain appetite stimulants, amphetamines, opioid painkillers, antivirals, cough suppressants, and drugs prescribed for Parkinson’s disease.

What to do if your Dog is Aggressive at Night

The best thing to do if your dog becomes more aggressive at night is to note any and all stimulus around him that may be causing or triggering the behavior. Alert your vet to these observations, as well as to any other symptoms you have seen in your dog. Accurately describe his eating and sleeping patterns, and any history of medications that he has been prescribed or may have accidentally ingested.  

Your veterinarian will want to determine if there is a physical reason behind the behavior. A physical exam will be performed, complete with hearing, vision, and neurological testing. This can reveal any sight, hearing, or cognitive issues. Bloodwork, a urinalysis, and a fecal test may be helpful in determining any infections, as well give a picture of your dog’s overall health. They can also point to a possible case of serotonin syndrome. X-rays may help to locate an obstruction or tumor. If there is not a physical reason found, then your vet will look at anxiety or aggression as behaviors to be treated.

Medical issues will be treated accordingly. Drug and dietary therapy may help to ease the signs of cognitive dysfunction. Any obstructions, wax build-ups, or tumors in the ear canal can be surgically removed to treat hearing loss that is not permanent. Infections can be treated with antibiotics. Hearing aids are available for dogs. Glaucoma can be treated with medications or surgery, but most dogs will lose their vision completely within a matter of years. Serotonin syndrome can be treated by supplementing dietary tryptophan, a precursor of serotonin production. An overdose or negative reaction to medications that may be the cause can be treated if caught early enough. Activated charcoal can help to prevent absorption in the digestive system, and vomiting may be induced. Fluid therapy and drugs may be prescribed to control the resulting symptoms of an overdose. 

You may need to engage in behavioral training techniques to manage anxiety, aggression, and a change in sleep cycles in your dog. Increasing joyful activities, such as walks and playtimes, can give him the exercise he needs to be able to rest at night. Creating a nighttime routine can help to train your dog to recognize when it is time to relax. Older pets may need orthopedic beds or a more protected sleeping spot to minimize discomfort and the element of surprise by an unwitting family member. For those dogs with cognitive dysfunction, hearing or vision loss, be sure your dog knows you are there with a soft pat or by calling his name. Anxious and aggressive dogs can benefit from desensitizing and counterconditioning techniques to retrain them to be calm during the night.

Prevention of Aggressive at Night

Prevent anxious and aggressive behavior through socialization and positive training in your dog’s early years. It may not always be possible to predict a fear, but knowing your dog’s trigger can help you to prevent it from occurring, remove your dog from the situation, or retrain him.  

Regular check-ups can reveal the presence of many types of conditions, including eye and hearing loss, infections, and imbalances in the body that can lead to conditions such as serotonin syndrome. Feeding a healthy, appropriate diet can ensure that your dog is receiving all the nutrients he needs to maintain a healthy body.

Cost of Aggressive at Night

Treatments for nighttime aggression can vary considerably, and will depend on the reason your dog is exhibiting this behavior.  Overall, costs can range from $200 to $3500. While hearing loss and glaucoma can average $350 to $900 respectively, a more complicated issue such as serotonin syndrome can cost around $2400. Aggression can be a difficult condition to treat, and can average $575.

Aggressive at Night Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Jazz
Springer Lab
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Biting, Jumping, Tizzy

I got my dog, Jazz roughly ten weeks ago when he was at the age of 2 years old. He was an abused pup, so I knew there would be some hurdles we'd have to jump through when we first got him. The part that that I am struggling with the most, though, is his tizzy's and aggressive behavior at night. During the day he is a super calm sweet boy, but around 9:30-10ish we begins to get the tizzy's, and then will try to play tug of war with my clothing, bedding, you name it.
The behaviorlist from the pound that i got him from told me to just calmly give him a time out and he will eventually stop doing this, but that has not worked. He doesn't seem to mind this time out/cool down time; he definitely does calm down throughout that time but as soon as I let him out he is crazy again. The vet did say that he most likely has anxiety, but to try calming treats before getting prescribed medication. Tried those, and they don't work.
What should I do!

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Gainsbourg
Bull Terrier
10 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

agression

I have a 10 months Bull Terrier. He had aggressions issues before that we corrected and it never happened again ( food aggression, territorial, protecting ) Only one problem we can't solve. when he is sleeping ( during day / night ) with somebody and you will touch him or accidentally move him, he will growl and even try to attack you. We dont allayed him to sleep on a bed, he have his own dog bed in a bedroom. But sometimes when we have friend staying on a couch he will sleep there and he will be same aggressive way... We other dog and they are best friends but she will NEVER sleep close to him..

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Blu
american pitbull
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression
e

I have a 3yr.old Pitbull, Blu, He barks at me when I stand up from my chair at my computer desk, Unless he is asleep & don't hear me..we put him in the kennel at night.The barking is loud! He does it everytime & it is annoying. What can I do to stop this? Thank You, Jane

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Thor
Mixed
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lungin

My dog is nearly four years and I've had him since he was 8 weeks old. For the last yearI've been dealing with him lunging at my cats when they are sitting on the back of the chair I'm in. He growls and lunges. I dont know how to stop this. This almost always happens at night. Sometimes during the day the cat runs by and triggers him to give chase...he is a terrier and I am working to correct that...but the lunging scares me.

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Cooper
50% Treeing Walker Coonhound,German Shepard
Two Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Barking, lunging

Recently my dog has become very aggressive at the end of the day when woken up from a sleep. He will bark and lung at whoever is near him. I can calm him down but this scares the family members.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for contacting us about Cooper. I'm sorry that he is displaying this behavior, and I understand that your family would be intimidated by this. Without knowing much about his history or background, it is hard for me to comment on how to change this behavior, but the first that that you should do is to book an appointment with his veterinarian to assess his health and make sure that there isn't something that hurts or bothers him that would explain this behavior upon waking. Once he has a clean bill of health, there are behavior specialists and trainers that specialize in aggressive dog training. It would be a good idea to have a trainer that comes into your home to assess the situation in his environment rather than one that you take him to, as he may not have the same triggers outside the home. This behavior is one that you want to change quickly, before it escalates for reasons that you do not know. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend a good trainer for you. I hope that things go well for him.

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Adler
German Wirehaired Pointer
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

None

We've Adler since she was a pup, however for the past few months she has become tense at night. This includes her growling when approached (like a low rumble, no teeth) However when it comes to putting her to bed (her crate in the hall) she will growl loudly and sometime show teeth. The other day when I lent over to turn off the lamp, she snapped and growled. She is usually very friendly all day, cuddling up to you until it starts getting closer to bed.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

It sounds like Adler has some separation anxiety leading up to bedtime or that something occurred during a previous night which has made her scared of the crate or the dark; behavioural problems are always difficult to pin down in dogs and I would recommend you speak with a Behaviourist as they will have more experience in areas like this. Many things may occur to a dog, but with a logical explanation they may become fearful of something (like a crate) which poses no threat. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hello! Our dog has become aggressive towards our other dog. They are both male and are 6 months apart in age. I've read the bio on reasons for dog aggression and none of the examples were relatable. I will share the one that becomes aggressive is not nurtured. Any offerings or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Angel 🐶

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Champ
Labrador Retriever
5 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

aggressive

I have a 5 month old puppy. He is mixed with yellow lab, golden retriever, husky, german shepard, and collie. The past couple of weeks he has been acting really strange. It happens every night between 8-9 pm. He will start running really fast around our home, jumping on the couch trying to tear it apart. He barks and makes noises while running. If you try to stop him he will bite you. Then he just stops and lays down and cries. Then he will get back up and do it all over again. What is going on with him?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It is strange for this behaviour to occur at the same time each day, normally when an issue occurs at the same time each day it is because there is something triggering the behaviour like a certain sound or event; I once saw a dog which would go crazy everytime the neighbours garage door opened. If there is a trigger, it is important to find it so you can either manage or anticipate it; however, if there is a noise or something similar you may be able to train Champ to ignore it (check link below). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/ignore-loud-noises

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Nick
Shih Tzu
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Biting at night

About once a week, nick will get very aggressive, and nine times out of ten it's at night. It lasts for about a minute, and almost always ends with a bite. All the sudden, his body language will change and he will curl up to a wall or somebody and stare directly at you while very tense. If you get near him he starts showing teeth and tenses more, and if you try to touch him, he will bite you. This only happens when someone trys to touch his underbelly or pick him up, and is very out of place with his normal behavior. Afterward he will come to you and try to snuggle and get attention.
He had tramadol that had been prescribed to him previously when he got fixed, and being dumb people we were like, what if he's in pain and that's why he's biting? So we gave him his dose for a week or two and no outbursts occurred. I don't like being bit, and I really don't like the idea that my dog could not feel well. Also, I'm getting to my wits end because it really hurts and swells up (I'm allergic to dogs, even hypoallergenic ones can get to me if the saliva directly touches my skin). The bruising will last for days.
Our vet keeps blowing off our worries as normal misbehavior and territorialness.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

The problem with these types of behavioural issues is that it is practically impossible to replicate the event for your Veterinarian and it does sound like a dog defending his territory, but in these instances we would expect to see this behaviour on a nightly basis not once per week. If Nick isn’t showing evidence of pain during a Veterinary visit it is very difficult for any Veterinarian to narrow down a specific cause which would lead to testing everything in hope that something pops up as being abnormal which can be an expensive endeavour. Tramadol is not a good control medication to use in these instances as humans which take it report an elevated mood and can be addictive for some people; a control test (if one should be done) should be performed with a non-steroidal antiinflammatory. If your Veterinarian is not taking Nick’s problem seriously, you could try another Veterinarian but if Nick isn’t having an ‘episode’ they may come up with nothing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Freddy
Pug
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

When Freddy is settling down at night he lays down on the sofa with the family but when someone moves or goes towards the door Freddy barks aggressively and lashes out, he also does it if we try and move him over when he’s asleep, also he barks and gets a bit aggressive when there’s any noise on telly he doesn’t like, he never actually bites you but goes to bite you and growls like he doesn’t like not getting his own way. I shout at him and put him in a naughty corner but he’s carrying on with it every night and I’m scared it will get worse. He doesn’t have a problem with sleep he sleeps very well in his cage at night and most of the time he’s asleep on the sofa at night before he gets aggressive when someone moves. In the day he’s very chilled out around the house it’s only at night when he starts being very anxey.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Behavioural problems like this can be difficult to understand and get control over, when you place him in the naughty corner you should also lay him down on the floor and hold him there is physically reinforce that you’re not happy with his behaviour. There is no quick fix and you may need to consult with a behaviourist. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Diesel
Rottweiler X
6 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Jumping on or at you
Biting, growling
Barking, digging, biting and tearing at furniture

I have a 6 month old male Rotti Sheppard X that we rescued at 8 weeks from a hoarder. He has been displaying night aggression for about 2 months, but the behaviour will sometimes occur in the day now as well.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
There are many different causes of aggression during the night which may be due to stress, fear, medication, hormone levels, poor vision among other causes; traumatic events that may have occurred one night may cause Diesel to now fear the dark. Territorial behaviour may also be an issue where at night he is trying to dominate his home; this is up for debate though. A check should be made with your Veterinarian to determine if there is anything medically wrong followed up with consultation with a Behaviourist. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Frankie
Shepard Lab Elkhound Chow Mix
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

Medication Used

none

Hi!
My dog is a little over a year old, and is THE sweetest thing ever. He has never once been mean, growled or even lunged at another dog. He literally hides when he’s growled at. Last night and tonight he went outside as usual, nothing different and met up with a dog he always plays with.. everyday! He suddenly lunged, growled and almost attacked. So bizzare. Is this his vision? He growled at a puppy last night in the dark as well

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Sudden aggression towards other dogs may be a dominance thing, establishing who is top dog; some dogs will do this every few months. Other causes may be vision especially at night or another behavioural issue; it is important to punish this behaviour to get a hold of it as soon as possible. Try meeting with the same dog during the day to see if the behaviour is the same; if so it may be dominance or territorial related. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Humphrey
Lhasa Apso
9 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Biting, lunging
Biting

My nine year old Lhasa Apso Humphrey has had a bad year. In February he was diagnosed with Lyme disease. During treatment we found out that he was stage three kidney disease. Since then, he is on three different medications, a kidney friendly diet and fluids administered under his skin daily. He has been my dog for nine years and with my husband and step son for three. Within the past few months, Humphrey has lunged at, bit and growled at my husband as he says goodnight to me while I'm on the couch. My husband also works at 4am and when he comes to say goodbye to me in the early morning (Humphrey is in bed with me at this point) he's exhibited the same behavior. He's also lunged at, snapped at and bit my step son every once in a while when he gets close to me at night. Conversely, Humphrey waits at the bottom of the stairs for my step son in the morning, waiting for him to get up! My mom thinks Humphrey has dementia or memory loss. Could his medications be causing this side effect? Why just at night? What should I do because he needs these medications to survive. Thanks!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
You need to enforce that this behaviour is bad and that you do not need him to intervene between you and your husband; you should punish Humphrey each time he shows this behaviour as punishment from the person he loves the most is usually more powerful. Afterwards, your husband should start punishing him too for other bad things around the house. It is possible that Humphrey’s eyesight is starting to go and is getting startled by your husband but I wouldn’t think that is the case; but you should visit your Veterinarian to make sure that nothing has changed for Humphrey medically. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Zeus
Malti-Poo
1.5
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Night aggression
aggressive
Biting

I rescued a Maltese poodle mix when he was about 8 months. It took him awhile to get used to my dog and still gets a bit aggressive with her on certain issues, like food. They both have their own food bowls but he seems to hover around both and becomes aggressive when she wants to eat hers. We have noticed at night he becomes really aggressive. He likes to sleep under my bed and whenever one of my kids walk by or even enter my doorway he growls and lunges at them, he has actually bitten them on some occasions. Recently he started to get aggressive towards me at night too. Whenever someone pets him or approaches him at night he lunges, growls and tries to bite them. I don’t know what to do since he’s about 1.5 years old and still displaying this behavior.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
You need to take corrective action each time Zeus tries to attack anyone by grabbing the scruff of his neck and pinning him to the floor on his side; this is a good punishment for dogs as it isn’t painful and is easy given his weight (less than 15lbs I would think). There is nothing worse for a dog trying to be dominant than not being able to move, when done right this is very effective. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Zoe
Bull arab
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

aggressive
barking
Lunging
Growling

Hi! I own a 3 year old female bull Arab. We adopted her about 6 months ago from the pound. We know her history, she was surrended by her owner (due to the owners ill health) and in foster care for a few months after. She is great! She fits in with my family well, and is an indoor and outdoor dog (she sleeps in my bed). Until about a month ago when I was going to bed, Zoe started aggressively growling at me and running around the bed and biting my hand. It wasn’t a playful bark it was quite aggressive and it sorta scared me. Do you know why this is happening, or what I can do to stop it?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
This type of behaviour may be a medical issue, but it is more likely to be psychological in origin (behavioural); the source of the aggression can be difficult to determine and controlling one can be difficult. I would suggest trying to think about possible triggers, what has changed when the aggression start and what is different; consultation with a Behaviourist would also be useful as there is rarely a one fits all solution to these types of problems. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Diesel
Lab mix
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Hi my dog is a 2 years old lab Shepard mix and we rescued him at 9weeks old from shelter. He has always been a really scared dog but would never try and hurt our family he loved us to the end of the earth. For the past year our dog has been getting real sick and has been in and out of the vet but this last time when he came home something was different. When I went to wake him up to give him his medicine he tried to attack to arm and he’s never been an aggressive dog he has done it to me probably 5 or so times now. When we try and get him to go to bed and push his butt a little to give him a nudge he try’s to attack our arms or our hands he starts growing and whips his head at your arms. Now lately if our female is in his way while he is trying to bark at the mailman he will go after her and she has about 35 lbs more weight on her so I yell and he just leaves her alone because he takes Playing to fair at that point. I just won’t know what to do. Ever since he came home from the vet a couple weeks ago which we do not go to that vet anymore he isn’t the same happy dog anymore!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It is difficult to say what is going on, most likely there is something behavioural and not medical with Diesel’s behaviour. Any aggression should be corrected immediately and you should find a way to punish him whether it is putting him to another room or putting him outside; you need to show him this behaviour isn’t tolerated. With these types of cases, I always suggest you consult a Behaviourist and have them observe the behaviour to give you tailored advice. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cadbury
Indian pariah
8 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

barking
Aggression
Snarl
Biting

My dog is very social and people friendly and remains pretty active and happy throughout the day, however as the night proceeds, she tends to start barking every night (usually after after 8pm) and also starts to bite my hand at every chance she gets. This has been happening since 4 weeks and I'm very disturbed because neither the trainer nor my dog's vet can decipher this sudden change of my dog's behaviour at night. Can anybody here please help me?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Sudden changes in behaviour like this may be associated with a traumatic event which occurred a few weeks ago, the event may be insignificant to you but a dog who cannot make sense of it may be frightened of the night now and bites etc… due to fear or anxiety. I cannot recommend much apart from giving constant reassurance and ensuring that she is comfortable; think about anything which occurred or changed at night just before this behaviour started. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Joey
Havanese
12 Months
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Growling (he sounded like a cougar

Joey is a one year old havanese. We have had him since 3 months old. Joey is a very affectionate dog. During the day you can pick him up any time. However, starting approx 10 days ago, he gets vicious at bedtime. We pick up his toys, telling him it's bedtime and goes to pick him up. He growls, shows his teeth and snaps at us.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
You need to pull rank with Joey and show him that you are not going to tolerate this behaviour; holding him by the scruff of the neck will help communicate the message and then lay him down on the floor and don’t allow him to move until you say so (after three or four minutes). If this continues, just repeat; when done correctly it may only take two or three times for him to get the message. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a Shitzapoo. She is a great, loving dog. A few months ago she started doing the same thing. She has alway's slept with me but won't even let me pick her up now. Her eyes glaze over and she acts like a completly different dog. She finally bit me. Did the technique of holding her down? I love her so much but this new behavior has got to stop.

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Indy
Beagle
8 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

I have a male Beagle (fixed) he's 8 months now. At night he tends to be more needy and showing more aggression. Mostly if he wants to play fetch with a toy. He has toys he likes to bring to you, play a biy of tug, let him win, he drops, throw toy short distance, he fetches - repeat. But after 50 times, we like to end the game. He gets angry. Comes over, bops my leg with his nose to get my attention, but if I don't engage or say No, he changes, starts to nip, sometimes nips at my pant leg (he has never actually bit me or anyone). If I get up he runs crazy, barks harshly at me) If I approach him he runs in circles. I can break this my getting low, using a calm voice, calling him like nothing just happened. He'll come over, guilty like, he will let me pet him, he might lick my hand, ) but 5 mins later this can start over...sometimes he pees after these bouts, or just suddenly goes to sleep. I would like to try to avoid these bouts entirely before things get worse.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
When Indy is getting angry, I would recommend placing him in another room as punishment like a utility room (just make sure there is nothing poisonous within reach which he can get at). You need to enforce your no and if he doesn’t comply, place him in another room with no toys; after repeating this a few times he should get the message and associate bad behaviour with isolation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Turbo
Chihuahua
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

I have a 10 year old chihuahua. When I found him he was about 2 years old and was dragging a broken leg behind him. I took him to the vet and they told me he had probably been abused and it looked like he was thrown out of a moving vehicle. He has a heart murmur as well. Also I have always thought he may have some depth perception issues because of his actions. Well I took him to the vet about 2 weeks ago because he was coughing and wheezing a lot. They did blood work and said everything looked good so they decided it was bronchitis and gave him a steroid shot. He was doing better in a couple of days. However the cough has slowly been coming back and my dog has been crying when I pick him up like something hurts. Last time he got a shot he acted like this for at least a week and would not go near me so I didn’t think to much of it. But the last couple of nights he hasn’t greeted me at the door when I get home (I work late nights) and doesn’t want to walk. Also, (To preface this I raised this dog with my black lab so he is not a stereotypical mean chihuahua- he loves all people and all dogs) he has now started to growl at me and kind of take an aggressive stance every time I come near him. Then morning comes and he’s back to his usual loving self. Any ideas on what’s going on?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
This is strange behaviour and may be an indication that he is in a lot of pain or it may just be behavioural; if Turbo continues like this it would be a case of being more strict with him and punishing his behaviour (laying him on the floor etc…). These types of cases are never easy and there is rarely a quick fix; correcting the behaviour immediately is important to ensure a good result. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Dexter
Bullmastiff
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

I have a male (whole dog) Bullmastiff who shows night aggression. We always thought due to his size it was too hot for him during the day and that is why he slept all day and chewed bones and played all night. We also own a (whole) male staffy who is almost 8 years old and has been victim of Dexters aggression, the first time he ended up in surgery but they stopped the fight on their own and when we found them the next morning they were asleep in the kennel together, when the staffy was at the vet Dexter cried the entire time and sat at the fence waiting for him to come home. The next time was just over 6 months later, Dexter was the instigator and it was at night, this time I broke them up by getting them to their chains to seperate them (we got these after the first fight as we didn't trust them alone any more) and after the police arrived over the fence they just stopped. Then fast forward another 6 months (almost to the day) to tonight, I was bringing in the washing and i went to go in the back door and they started trying to fight, again Dexter instigated and the staffy was yelping in fear but defending himself but both were chained so they couldn't reach each other. I should also add Dexter has a fear of plastic; buckets, washing baskets, plastic bags, anything that makes a noise that is plastic and knowing that I purposely didn't bring the washing in using the basket.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Aggression in dogs can be difficult to control, having two intact males can mean that there is rivalry for the top dog position; medically I would suggest neutering both of them but I doubt that there is anything medically wrong with Dexter and you just need to brush up on training. Minimising triggers is important which you are doing by not using the plastic laundry basket etc… Apart from speaking with a Trainer I cannot really suggest anything else apart from keeping them separate. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Spaß Macher
Corgi Pomeranian
8 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

My dog is 8 years old and is a corgi/Pomeranian mix. I just adopted him 3/4 months ago. He’s great with people, other dogs, even my cats. My dog is ONLY aggressive at night. In the middle of the night he growls and snaps if we move around. If I try to move him (even if he’s still awake) while he’s on the bed he tries to bite me. If I try to just get him out of the bedroom so he can sleep in the living room he will put up a nasty fight. What do I do to get rid of this bed time aggression? Why is he so agressive at night?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
You need to punish this behaviour, when he snaps or growls you need to take control and either place him on the floor as punishment or put him in another room like a utility room to be alone so he will pick up on his behaviour is not wanted. Taking in an older dog can be difficult because you don’t know what happened before and this may link to his night time aggression. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Buford
Bloodhound
4 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

I have adopted a 4 year old Bloodhound rescue. He is great during the day with myself and kids. My kids are 11 and 14. It seems around 7/8pm he starts getting antsy. We have tried adding an additional walk around this time of night but that doesn’t seem to help. We have only had him three weeks. Over the past week he has started to growl and lunge at my two daughters. He has growled and bit my husbdan once and then last night my oldest was sitting on the couch watching TV; he started to growl at her and then lunged at her to bite her; I put my leg up in time that i took the impact. He continued to growl and go for her until I was able to remove both kids from the area. I’ve called the rescue group to take him back but I feel such pangs of guilt because during the day he is so great and sweet! Am I making the wrong choice?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It can be difficult to understand and control a dog’s actions especially in a dog Buford’s size; I would recommend getting a session with a Behaviourist as these issues rarely have a one stop quick fix. I know it can be bad to think that you’re sending him back to a shelter but your daughter's safety is more important. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have two cane corsos . One female , one male . The female we've had since puppy . The male has always been around us but belonged to my bf brother and we adopted him due to financial security . I love them both dearly and I'm not a bad Owner . They are both big dogs especially the male. The male has been having sleep aggression . When me and my bf lay down on the bed he starts to growl and nip at my boyfriend . He hopps on the bed and barks at my boyfriend and starts to nip . When my boyfriend gets up to regulate he gets even worse and growls and we have to calm him down to get off the bed . I don't know if it's that he wants to sleep on the bed or what . But we're becoming frightened and we don't scare easy we love big dogs ! Our female is great very trained and listens to every command she has brought the male a long way .

This is the women with cane corso I need help Im scared for my dog . I don't believe in euthanization but if he continues this scary behavior I don't know what to do . I'm trying to train him I need your tips

Catherine C.: Don't be scared of your dog! He's very fearful, maybe territorial, but not angry. In my experience, if you approach the dog carefully and slowly, they can't calculate your intent. They think you're making a move. I find that if I approach the bed indirectly (not looking at them) and at a natural-quick pace (like when I'm usually getting into bed) they sense your calm/ordinary body language.

After this, I wait. When they relax, I tell my dog 'down' or 'off' when I'm ready to sleep. I may have to do it several times and deal with her huffing and grunt, but having a stern unwavering voice eventually gets her off.

Make sure you practice this command during the day. 'Up' to get him on the bed, 'down' to get him off. Treat and praise when done correctly. Normal treats might not do it, use chicken. Do it during the day, again in the afternoon, evening, and at night. It took our newly adopted 4 y/o 2.5 months to learn. When she follows the off command, she's usually a bit upset, she goes under hour bed. Make sure your dog (albeit huge) has their own safe space within the room.

I hope this helps!

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Clyde
Lab mix
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Snapping, ears pinned back, jumpy

We have lab brothers that are almost 2 years old. Clyde has always been the fiestier of the 2, (he's smaller) and I have noticed recently what I would think is guarding behavior (very protective of food...he will actually eat all of his food then force his bigger brother away from his bowl) they have scuffled some over food so we keep them separate or monitor when we are feeding now. Recently, clyde has started snapping at myself or my husband at night if we reach over to pet him.It's not every time and not every night. He usually sleeps on the couch while we are watching tv in the den, and he has never bit, but will snap. No growling and doesn't show his teeth. It seems like he has a different look in his eyes during this time. Ears are usually laying back and flat. They had a good bill of health at 1 year check ups. My husband is very leery because we have a 10 year old in the house. During the day, he is a total cuddle bug. He does show jealousy when his brother comes to love on either of us and will push his brother off of my lap and lay across me. We just don't want him being aggressive. Can he be helped??

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Any aggressive behaviour needs to be met with disapproval; whether it is holding him down by the scruff of the neck, placing him in another room along after a verbal warning, withholding affection or another method. There is no fixed method of managing these outbursts in a dog Clyde’s size, but the longer you don’t address the problem the more difficult it will be to correct. It is possible that the snapping when being petted may be due to him be startled, caught off guard or may be due to pain in the area being petted. I cannot say what the specific cause is, but you should visit your Veterinarian to rule out medical causes and a Behaviourist to work on everything else. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Dom
Dalmatian
1 Year
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Growling

I have a one year old dalmatian that is always very cuddly and sweet. He will come and sit with me on the couch or my bed and he insists on being cuddled up close to me. Only problem is when he is resting and I move slightly he will growl and kind of sit up alert. If I move suddenly he will growl, jump up like he is terrified and walk around a little bit. Sometimes right after he has jumped up he looks slightly confused. Then he will come right back and cuddle up to me again as if nothing happened. He only just started doing this two month ago since he was neutered. He is a very talkative dog during the day and is not aggressive in any other way. He is a great dog but I think something is bothering him that I need to fix because it is defiantly upsetting him. I also don’t want his aggression to escalate.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Dalmatians are prone to many issues including blindness, deafness among other issues; it is possible that Dom is being startled at night with movement and it is confusing him or he is unsure about what is happening. It would be best to have him checked over by your Veterinarian to ensure everything is alright medically before looking at behavioural issues. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

He had both his vision and hearing tested before purchase. As well as when he got neutered the ran some blood tests which all came back in perfect health.

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Ben
Lab mix
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My dog is a lab mix and around 10 years old. Lately at night he seems more aggressive, he sleeps with me and my wife at night and has the same routine, comes up on my side of the bed lays beside me and gets his chest rubbed, after about 15 mins he lays either at my feet or between my legs then sleeps. Recently when he gets his chest rubbed he wants to growl and sometimes its a mean aggressive growl he even bares his teeth, if this happens I place him on his back until he stops. Am I doing the right thing? Because he doesn't seem to be getting better. Doesn't make sense because he is a mild mannered dog and very loving to my wife and I.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
When these episodes occur, you should lay him on his side and hold him down so he cannot move and make him lay there motionless until you say he can get up; it can take time for a dog to pick up on these things but with persistence you should get through to him - just be more stubborn than him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Delilah
Bull Terrier
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

I have 2 dogs, Rufus who is a 6 year old jack Russell/min pin mix, and Delilah who is a 1 year old bull terrier/min pin mix. Over the last 3 months Delilah has been attacking Rufus at bed time. (We all sleep together in a queen bed) it was never a problem before but the last few months are getting worse. If Delilah is under the covers and Rufus jumps
On the bed she goes insane and it’s a full out dog brawl. The very recommended getting her spayed so on Nov 28 we did that ands it’s helpe a little bit still bad. They get along perfect all day long and even share a kennel but for some reason at night Delilah doesn’t want Rufus on the bed, under the covers or really near us. Even though for the first 9 months of her life there were no problems. Help please! We love Delilah but I’ve had Rufus fore 6 yearss what do I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
If Delilah is causing these problems at bedtime you should remove her from the bed or from the bedroom all together to show that her behaviour is not wanted, when she is fine letting Rufus on the bed praise her for it (not too much). It is a case of giving her a timeout off the bed or the bedroom when this occurs until she gets the point which may take a while. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Brynn
Whippet
11 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

I used to think that my puppy growling and snapping at night was just her need for space.
It started a few months back, where she would growl and sometimes snap at either of my other two dogs. I have a 14 yr old who isn't very mindful of where he walks, especially on the bed.
Whippets as a rule tend to like to bury themselves in the blankets, so it made sense that she didn't want to be stepped on.
Then it started happening when one of the other dogs stretched out and kicked or pushed against her.
The last few nights I have noticed that she is lying without anyone even near her and she still will wake and growl or snap. Occasionally at me too.
She does stop and go back to sleep almost immediately after I say her name. However it does seem to be happening more frequently throughout the night.
We all sleep on a king size bed, so there is plenty of room and blankets!
She is only 11 months old and approx. 30 pounds, so its not something I can't handle... I just wonder what is causing this, could she be in pain?
She and her litter sister play all day long and sometimes it gets heated.. but this is different and I see no reason for it.
So I guess what I am asking, is whether this seems like a behavioral issue or should I be looking for some underlying cause?

On a side note, when this first started happening she had what I would call a head tremor, cause her head(only her head) would shake for about 5 seconds
I talked to her breeder that seemed to think it was a pinched nerve, so she recommended some massage therapy. It seemed to work as the tremors stopped, but this attitude has persisted... is there a possible relation?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It may be a behavioural issue where Brynn may wake up suddenly for some reason and goes straight into attack mode, my own dog does it infrequently; if the cause is that something wakes her up like a twitch or a spasm it may be that she starts fighting back. You should take her into your Veterinarian for an examination to rule out causes of pain notably spinal pain, before settling on a behavioural cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Gretel
German Shepherd
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Hyperactivity
Panting

My dog has been going crazy at night. I'm not sure I would call her behavior aggressive, but it's definitely not normal. We have a gate to close her in the kitchen when we're not home (because there was an instance where she attacked our other dog a couple years ago and in general she is a little too nasty when she plays with him) and a gate that keeps the dogs from going upstairs. We used to have three dogs, but one of them passed away a few weeks ago. Since then, Gretel keeps having these episodes and they're happening more often. She keeps trying to get upstairs. Two nights ago, she broke the gate enough to shove her way through it and get to the top of the stairs, but we blocked her from getting any further and brought her back down. Tonight, she broke the gate more and before I could stop her, she went all the way up to the third floor and into my uncle's bed (he doesn't live with us, he just comes to stay with us sometimes). She's never been up to the third floor before, which is weird enough, but it's even weirder since my uncle used to be our other dog's owner before the dog died (he moved into an apartment in the city and couldn't keep the dog there so we took him). I don't know why she's been so desperate to get up there, but it only happens at night. We have an electric collar that can both play noise and shock her, but even that doesn't stop her. How can we calm her down? (Also, tonight a huge grey tick fell off of her but I don't think that's related because she's showing the exact opposite of the symptoms of Lyme disease.)

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Clare, thank you for contacting us about Gretel. That is definitely strange behavior, I agree. It is hard to say why she wants to get upstairs - sometimes dogs are very intuitive about things that we aren't aware of. I also don't think that the tick is related. It would probably be a good idea to see your veterinarian and consider giving her a sedative at night, something to calm her down and allow her to sleep through the night. Your vet will be able to give her a good exam, make sure that everything else is okay, and prescribe something to calm her down in the evening. Perhaps she is reacting to your other dog being gone, but whatever the reason, it seems her behavior is escalating and we need to calm her down in the evenings. I hope everything goes well with Gretel!

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Xena
Labrador Retriever
9 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

My nine year rescue lab has become increasingly more aggressive towards our other dog, shiba inu. They have been together for 5 years and most of the time they are best friends but now at night the lab goes into ull,attack mode if the other dog walks around. We currently moved to a new house so not sure if that is cause. She becomes out of control so I drag her into cage, do not want her to hurt other dog! How do I stop this

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for contacting us about Xena, I'm sorry that that is happening. The best thing to do would be to have a veterinary behavior trainer come into the house and work with the two dogs in their environment. Your lab is also getting older, and may have eyesight or other issues that make her more defensive, so a veterinary visit would be a good place to start, to make sure that she is healthy. Your vet will be able to recommend a trainer in your area that they trust. I hope everything goes well for both of them

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Ralphie
Jack Russell Terrier
2 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Ears back, growling, baring teeth

Medication Used

Heartworm protection. Flea/tick med

Hello, I just adopted a rescue dog named Ralphie, a Jack Russel terrier mix, two weeks ago. He is generally very loving, spunky and loyal. Before I took him in, he had first been in an overcrowded shelter. Then a no-kill shelter took him on and he was shuffled among foster homes several times within a week. I live in an apartment, so I've been walking him five times daily during the week, and taking him to the dog park twice daily on weekends.

As I said, he's loving during the day, but at night he becomes aggressive and possessive. He'll suddenly start growling while we are sharing a chair. Sometimes, he even cowers in his kennel, ears back, growling and barking. It scares me a little. I usually give him space when this happens. He seems to demand space at night, but then in the morning he sometimes cries for my attention. At night, if I leave and return, he's usually friendly again.

I've thought that perhaps conditions at the overcrowded shelter worsened at night. He might be revisiting a trauma. I'm reluctant to "punish" the behavior because I don't want to reinforce his apparent fear. However, the behavior itself needs to stop. What do you recommend?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Poor Ralphie, he has had a lot of emotional trauma in his short life. I am glad that you realize that he needs patience and positive reinforcement, rather than punishment. I think at this point it would be a good idea to hire a trainer for him. We need to make sure this behavior is corrected before it escalates. An exam by your veterinarian would be a good idea first, to make sure that he is healthy, and discuss whether he might benefit from anti-anxiety therapy. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend a good trainer to work with. I hope that everything goes well for Ralphie.

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Finn
German Shepherd Dog
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Growling

I have a 3 year old German Shepherd/Norwegian Elk Hound mix male. My daughter brought this dog into our home when he was a puppy. She has since moved out and he has become my dog. Since he was a puppy he tended to listen to me more. If I am not around him or paying him any attention he will bark until he is by my side. My husband has insomnia and is often up in the middle of the night. Lately our dog has started growling and lunging at my husband when he walks into the bedroom. Sometimes he will stand over me and act like he is trying to protect me. I can yell at him, grab his collar and force him to the ground, so he cannot lunge at my husband and hurt him. During the day, my husband and him get along just fine. I need to do something about this before someone gets hurt.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It seems that Finn is very protective of you, but i agree with you, you need to be able to control his behavior. Without seeing him, I can't really suggest any solutions. What would be a good idea woudl be to seek the help of a behaviorist who is able to train aggressive dogs. They will be able to work with you, and Finn, and help everyone understand each other. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend a suitable trainer for you. I hope that things go well for Finn.

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Benji
Lhasa Apso
4 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Shaking

Right my grandma has 2 dogs which i can stroke or walk past when sleepy but with mine even when he's tired or you go near him he tries to bite me is this normal?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Biting you is not good behavior, and Benji would probably benefit from some training classes. Your veterinarian will be able to give you the names of trainers that can work with him.

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Simba
Shih Tzu cross
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

Hi my 4 year old shih tzu cross has recently become aggressive when getting put to bed. For about 3 years he slept in my room but due to him constantly waking me up I had to move him to the laundry to sleep at night. He has a nice bed and responded to it well. But after about 4 months he started wining non stop as well as barking and scratching the door, he would go on for about 15-20 minutes before eventually stopping. That happened for about 2 months and has stopped now but instead he growls and goes to bite (never has actually biten me) whenever I try to take him to bed. It's getting really bad and honestly it makes me scared of him at night, even though during the day he is the sweetest dog. I just don't understand why it started happening if he was doing really well with the change to the laundry for about 4 months, and I can't think of anything that really changed

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Behavioural issues like this can be difficult to pinpoint, it may be that there is a noise or something else which is causing Simba to be scared of the laundry room and he is reluctant to go there. When he shows signs of aggression you should punish him by picking him up by the scruff of the neck (support his rear end) and then place him in the laundry room and leave him there, if you feel comfortable enough restrain him on his side as part of the punishment. If you don’t see any improvement, try a different room one night to see if it is the room or the separation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Illidan
Mix
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

My dog is the sweetest and kindest dog...To me and my wife. and once we get him used to someone new that we introduce in our house he is the same with them. He does snip at people he dosnt know that try to pet him. he has been like this with us since we met him in the shelter. However when we take him out at night he seems to get aggrisve and trys to go after anyone who gets near. he will bark and strain against his leash. and if he gets free he will go after and try to bite them. this seems to only be at night as far as i can tell.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Aggression at night may be due to protecting you, unsure of surrounding do to poor eyesight or hearing or another cause; you need to try to punish Illidan for these outbursts of bad behaviour and find a way to show that you disapprove of the behaviour either by physical restraint (if less than 20lb), ignoring him, placing him in a different room or withholding treats etc… Each case is different and should be treated as such, you may need to consult a Behaviourist. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Snoopy
Beagle
4 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Growling, Biting, Howling,Snapping

Hello, I have a 4 month male beagle. I recently got him 2 weeks ago. I wasn’t having any problems with him until recently. I started noticing that while playing or in bed, he will start growling. Which I thought was normal but then it started getting out of hand. During the night when my family and I are ready in bed to sleep, he begins to growl, howl, scratch and pull anything he sees. He does not sleep with me instead he sleeps in his own bed next to mine. However, when I try calming him down, he begins to become more aggressive which is becoming more of a concern for me because I have little siblings. Is there anything I could do? I recently just took away all his belongings to show him that he’s not being a good dog but is there something I should be worried about? Please help.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It can be difficult to determine what is going on in a dog brain and what is logical for them or not; in these cases you need to punish firmly with physical restraint (not hitting or anything). When dogs are young they respond well to being restrained as a punishment and will quickly catch on that their behaviour isn’t wanted, this will become more difficult as Snoopy ages. If the growling continues, place him in another room or place him in a crate to enforce disapproval. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Fonzie
Blue Heeler
3 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

None

Fonzie is part blue heeler part basset hound. I Dont let him in the bedroom at all, nor has he ever tried to come in. But when I turn the TV off, turn the lights down, and put his pillows on the couch, as well as dog bed...I go to pet him before I go to my room to go to bed, he shows his teeth and growls at me. He is a rescue. He just started doing this in the past month(I've had him 6 months now). Its strange, he looks like he wants to bite me but he holds his head low like he thinks I'm going to hit him. I've never hit him, I use positive reinforcement to train. But he can not continue this behavior. What could cause this? He is a total love bug all day till I go to bed

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

Do you always pet Fonzie in the same place each night? If you normally stroke his head try stroking his back instead. The reasons for sudden aggression in a dog which receives love and care can be complex and may take time to narrow down; physical problems may cause pain whilst being petted in a particular area which leads to this behaviour, other causes like occurrences in his history which may be triggered are a big unknown in rescue dogs. I would have Fonzie checked over by his Veterinarian to detect if there is a medical problem or a behavioural problem as medical problems may occur suddenly leading to behavioural changes; if Fonzie is given a clean bill of physical health, behavioural issues can be explored. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My German Shepherd/lab retriever is 4 years old and we got him from the humane society about 4 weeks ago. He was fine at first but within the past week or 2 he’s been very agressive at night, biting, acting and he doesn’t stop. My sister was up all night with him one night. We’ve resorted to putting him in his cage now Because we need sleep for work/school. I’m getting worried.

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Hershey
Labrador Retriever
3 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Biting

Hi. I adopted Hershey, a chocolate lab (possible pit mix), from the humane society when he was estimated to be 2 years old. He was found wandering after a hurricane with no ID tags. I have had Hershey for one year now. His most recent vet check-up was good in 11/2017 and he weights 85 pounds. He is a very loving dog; however, in the last couple of months he has started showing sleep aggression. It seems as if he is fighting something in his sleep and is distraught. Twice while on the couch with him he lunged forward, bared teeth, growled and bit. When I called his name and said "off" he looked completely confused as if he had no idea what had happened. However, one night this week he was even more upset in his sleep than before. He lunged at me snarling and bit again, but it took longer for him to stop. Then as I stood to take care of my blood dripping arm he lunged and bit again. He has never shown aggression towards me except the recent sleeping incidents. I no longer sit with him on the couch and now crate him when I go to bed. However, I am afraid of him when he is asleep at other times during the day or early evening. He has always been sensitive to loud noises and is also terrified of thunderstorms. Any advice?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
We don’t know of Hershey’s history before he was found and we have no idea how traumatic the experience of the hurricane may have been; this is certainly a behavioural issue than an actual medical issue. These cases are never straight forward and I am not going to be able to offer any specific advice to you with a single post since the issue is when Hershey is asleep, if it was a conscious act it is easier to modify with behaviour. I would start crating him when he normally goes to sleep so he isn’t a danger to you or himself and monitor him; you should return to your Veterinarian for another examination to see if there any any changes with him in the four months since his last physical examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Max
Dalmatian
1 Year
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

I dont know

I don’t know if this is allowed, but I need some help.. I am a first time Dalmatian owner and I’m having some issues.. this just started recently, probably about 3-4 days.. and it just happened again... Okay, so, my Dalmatian does perfect through out the day and is always getting attention, and love and he is always getting the right amount of exercise, well at night he growls at just about everyone, twice he has showed his teeth to my mom. Last night he growled at me twice. Tonight my dad came over and was petting him, he was fine, then my mom comes over and tries to also love on him before going to bed because thats a normal routine.. he tried to jump at her and I jumped up immediately as I saw it grabbed him by the collar and wore him out. He nicked her on the chin a little. Can someone please explain to me why this may be happening? What do I need to do? Why only at night?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I'm not sure how long you have had Max, or where he came from when you got him, but sometimes dogs have histories that we aren't aware of that cause changes in behaviors, and sometimes if they are newly adopted, behaviors can start when they get comfortable. Since this is a new behavior but seems to be escalating, it would be a good idea to work on it now before someone gets hurt. It would be a good idea to first have Max seen by a veterinarian to have an examination and make sure that he doesn't have a health concern, a problem with his vision or otherwise. If he seems healthy, the next step would be to hire a trainer to work with him, and your family, to find out the triggers for him and correct this behavior. You want to make sure that you find a trainer that uses positive techniques, and not punishment, and your veterinarian can recommend someone for you.

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Minnie
Chihuahua
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression
barking

I have a 2 and half year old Chihuahua called Minnie that we have had since 12 weeks old and about 6 months ago we got 2 new puppies who were also about 12 weeks old. The Chihuahua has always been a very protective dog over me and did sometimes growl if my partner came near me when she was sat on or near me. When we got the puppies Minnie was protective to start with but gradually calmed down and is now a lot better and she plays etc with the puppies now. All of sudden she has started to get very aggressive towards the puppies during the night. They all sleep on the bed with me and my partner but this has only happened when my partner has not been home. She is a lot more protective regarding barking and noises she hears on a night time when i am alone but it seems she is during the night standing over the puppies and growling for no reason (they are asleep may i add) and when i try to move her she snaps at the puppies and growls at me. Is this something i can put down to her being protective or should i be worried?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It is difficult to say what the specific cause for this behaviour but you should be taking corrective action to punish Minnie for these outbursts so she knows it is unwanted behaviour; either manually restraining her until she calms down, placing her in another room or a crate to show that the behaviour isn’t wanted (you may need to do these actions repetitively until she gets the message). This is something to get resolved now, the longer you wait the more difficult it will be to correct. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jadzia
Jack Russell Terrier
17 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Circling

Our jack Russel is 17 and is experiencing dementia. Although she will go in circles during the day, at night she is much worse. We give her melatonin around 6 p.m. but it does not seem to help much. She has been checked by a vet and is healthy for her age. Her circling is getting worse and she is distressed and almost seems to be in some kind of seisure. What can we do to help her?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
There are not very many treatments for cats with dementia, unfortunately, and as they age, some cats do go through brain changes. I'm not sure if her blood pressure has been checked, but I have found that some cats have high blood pressure as they get older, and I think they may get headaches or similar types of conditions that cause them to vocalize and display odd behavior. If your veterinarian hasn't considered that, it would be worth checking.

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cooper
Australian Kelpie
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

sometimes trying to bite us
Snapping
showing his teeth
Growling

hello i have a kelpie and his names cooper. we have noticed that he's an amazing loving dog during the day but quite growly and showing his teeth quite a lot at night. he is only 5 and is on no medications at all. we are quite worried as he does it when we give him attention and then he growls at us and shows his teeth then he wants to be petted. its juts got us very confused.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Aggression can be difficult to manage, you should think about what else is occurring at night which may be triggering these episodes; sometimes a bad past experience, an object or person can trigger aggression. Unfortunately there is no quick fix and you may need to get a Behaviourist or Trainer to help you in person. Reassurance is key but it may take a long time for Cooper to be comfortable at night; as I mentioned, look for triggers or anything else which may be causing him to be scared. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Leila
Lab golden retriver
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

barking
Lunging
Growling

My dog is a goldador who is as sweet as can be. I've had her for about a year now, and got her from a service dog trainer. She is in training to be my service dog, but when I walk her at night she lunges at men coming up to us. The trainer said she hasn't seen any aggressive behavior from her before, so I'm lost on what she needs. I take her out into public places for her training and she does really well. Even on the bus with closed quarters she does great. This behavior, the aggression, only popped up in the last few week

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
This behaviour needs to be addressed before it becomes a habit, the link below is to a training guide we have on training a dog to not attack strangers; there is also a section towards the bottom where you are able to consult a certified dog trainer which may be useful as well for you. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-strangers

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Twix
Yorkshire Terrier
6 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Growling, biting, lunges.

I have had my dog sinshe was 6 months old. And now it’s been 5 years . 8 months ago she has started growling, lunging, and snapping at me. And it’s only at night time. She started this and it was happening maybe 1 time every few weeks. Well the next 3 months its its maybe 2 to 3 times every 2 weeks. Well in the last 2 to 3 months it’s every night and now some days to. I have had a full blood work done on her. And a vision test, and still no help. I have had her at 2 vets and neither one can figure it out. She’s got anxiety every since I got her. She’s been on Fluoxetine 10MGS. Half in the morning and half in the evening. I thought she might be starting to have dimentia. Can you help me with her?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I'm unfortunately not able to help very much over an email with this behavioral problem that she is developing, but since you have had her examined by her veterinarian and she has gotten a clean bill of health, you would be best to hire a good trainer to work with her at this point. He behavior seems to be escalating, and unfortunately we can't ask her what is going on! A good trainer will be able to pinpoint the cause of her behavior and offer advice on how to curb that aggression. She is quite young to be suffering from any dementia, and without any other neurologic signs, it is unlikely a problem with her brain - most likely it is a behavior that you are unwittingly let happen since you don't know what is causing it. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend a trainer in your area that they recommend, and you just want to make sure the trainer works with positive reinforcement techniques vs punishment. I hope that all goes well for her!

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Frankie
Puggle
8 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lunging
Biting
Growling

Frankie is an incredibly friendly dog to everyone she meets, though at night and only at night she becomes quite aggressive towards my father. It first started with growling and lunging but then progressed to biting and slightly more aggressive behaviour. Yet again she only does it at night and overall is very friendly, any thoughts on how we can try to correct this behaviour?? Thanks :)

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
This certainly does sound like a behavioural issue and may be triggered by one of many different things, something may have occurred at night involving your father leading Frankie to have some mistrust of him which may be due to simple things which we (humans) wouldn’t even notice. It is important to give Frankie reassurance and together with your father show Frankie at night that there isn’t anything to be afraid of. We have a training guide below on stopping a dog from attacking, we don’t seem to have one covering Frankie’s specific issue however towards the bottom of the page there is a section where you can ask a certified dog trainer a question. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-attacking

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Ralphy
Mixed
6 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Night time

we have had our dog for 6 years we got him when he was only 6 weeks old he has always been a loving member of our family but within the last couple of months only at night time he is attacking our 12 year old daughter and is actually bit her and drew blood but during the day he loves her to death it's at night if she walks in the room where he's laying he'll just lunge at her and attack her what could be causing this please help

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Ralphy may be having a problem with his vision, or other medical problem, that is causing this behavior. It would be a good idea to have him examined by a veterinarian, as they can look at his eyes and assess his general health and see if anything physical may be going on to cause the behavior. I hope that everything is okay with Ralphy.

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Thor
Labrador Pitbull
1 Year
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Nighttime aggression

My husband and I adopted our Lab-Pit mix back in January 2018 and he is just a little over a year old. For the past month he has become increasingly more aggressive toward me at night but is so sweet and playful during the day. Lately he has been lunging toward me, punching me with his nose, barks louder and deeper than usual and bares his teeth when I crouch down to try and calm him. We’ve worked with a trainer and every vet visit we are assured he is in great health. There are no triggers I can identify that cause him to act this way.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
If this is a new behavior, it would be a good idea to call the trainer that you worked with and let them know that this is happening, so that they can help you stop the behavior before it escalates. Since he is in good health otherwise, the trainer may be able to figure out the trigger for this and let you know how to change it. I hope that all goes well for Thor.

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Avalon
Rottweiler/Labrador
9 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Hi there! My 9 yr old Rott/Lab rescue that I’ve had for 7 years growls at my bf (living together for 6 mos) when he comes to bed at night but she absolutely loves him every other time of day. They play and rough house and she’s a talker so we’re used to the vocals but it seems a bit more aggressive at night. When he finally gets into bed, she gets close to him to kiss him but it’s just before that she’s very aggressive towards him. Not sure how to fix the situation. Thank you.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Behavior can be a very complex thing, and it would be a good idea to have a trainer work with you and Avalon before the behavior escalates. There may be a very simple trigger that can be changed, and a trainer can watch the interaction between her and your boyfriend and offer advice on how to change that.

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Ginger
Poodle
3 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Nipping
Snarling
Biting
Growling

We have a rescue toy poodle. She is 3 years old. We have had her for almost one year now. Up until last month she was very quiet and calm at all times. But lately she has become aggressive at various times. She growls and nips when we try to pick her up, or move her. Mostly this happens late afternoon and early evening... but today it was at lunchtime too. We are getting very worried as the nipping is getting worse. Today she nipped my daughter and myself. We have no access to trainers or behaviorists as we live in an isolated area of Borneo island. We need help. How can we correct this behaviour please????

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
This is most likely a behavioural issue and not a medical one, if you don’t have access to a dog trainer you should check out the training articles on our site (linked below) for various guides on stopping aggression among other things; also at the bottom of each article there is a section where you can ask a certified dog trainer a question for further help. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/behavior

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Kali
Mixed breed
4 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Showing teeth
Hiding
Growling

A couple months ago I adopted 2 puppies that are siblings, a boy and girl. Recently at night the girl, Kali, has started to get aggressive at night when they wake up to use the bathroom. Once they come back inside I will try to take her to the room to go back in the kennel and she will start growling at me. At first it was a little growl and I could tell her no and still pick her up. But now it is a very mean growl and is starting to show teeth. I am scared she is going to get even more aggressive.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
It would be best to stop this behavior at this point, as they are both very young dogs. Working with a trainer for them would be best, as I cannot work with them over an email. You want to make sure that you hire a trainer that works with positive techniques, vs. punishment. At this age, it should be uncomplicated to change this behavior.

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Sadie
Don’t know
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Don’t

Hi I have a three year ago dog that i got from a shelter about a month ago and the shelter said that they don’t know her history when they got her she a friendly dog but when it comes at night she is aggressive starts to bite when I touch or pick her up or just to put her collar on her and she barks to when I more her cage to a different room

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Since you don't know anything about Sadie's history, she may have triggers that you aren't aware of. It would be best to stop this behavior before it escalates, and working with a trainer would be the best way to help the two of you. It would be a good idea, as well, to have her examined by a veterinarian to make sure that there aren't any health concerns contributing to this behavior.

I have taking her to a vet for exam they said she is healthy and I do take her to a dog training class but they don’t know how to help me

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Murray
Cockapoo
19 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

aggressive
Biting
Growling

Hi, I have a almost 2 year old Cockapoo we got from a breeder when he was 8 weeks old. Initally we crate trained him at night for the first 3 months, because of work schedules we stopped and allowed him to sleep in bed with us. During the day his is never aggressive, very playful and good with people. Once we go to sleep and one of us moves after the dog falls aleep he growls and bites. Hes broken skin in the past. We then tell him to get off the bed and he does, but if we move he growls and bites, even when hes on the floor. I've tried to keep him just on the floor but he cries and jumps up on the bed and as soon as he falls alseep and someone moves he gets aggressive again. Its been progressively getting worse for the last year. I know returning to crate training would most likely solve the issue but is there anything we can do to avoid this?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
There is no quick fix here since the aggression and biting are a instant behaviour to one of you moving and not a thought process which is gone through (so it isn’t a conscious thought). I cannot think of a solution for this issue apart from placing him in another room or crating. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Gizmo
Mix
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

We rescued a one year old dog about 2 months ago. He is an overall great dog. He listens well, gets along great with our other dog and is very sweet and loving with my wife and 11 month old daughter. The first couple of weeks we had him he slept in his crate. It would take coaxing with a treat to get him in, but he would be fine. We then went away for a weekend and had my brother stay at our house with him. He was great when we returned home, but then that night he was laying on my wife, she was petting him and he just growled and nipped at her. He jumped off of her and then right back on her. He did this again a couple of minutes later. We put him in his crate that night and he whined and cried for 2 hours straight. We ended up bringing him into bed with us and our other dog and he seemed to do fine that night. Now both dogs sleep in bed with us and, for the most part, it's fine. However, a few times when one of us gets up to get something and then get back into bed, we move him from our spot and he'll growl, sometimes show his teeth. We tell him no, he will move and then want to be pet. I'm not sure if he's startled and gets defensive or if there is something that happened in his past to cause this. He also tends to get a little aggressive when we have people over. Our other dog barks a lot when people come into our house, so I'm not sure if he is picking up on her actions. I now keep him on a leash when people come over because he nipped at people the second week we had him (he was off leash). We are considering getting a trainer, but wanted to see if you had any advice/insight.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I think a trainer is a great idea for Gizmo. Often, as dogs become more comfortable in a home environment, behaviors start to show themselves, and his are relatively mild at this point. A trainer can work with him, and you, and show you how to correct those behaviors before they escalate. You just want to make sure that you get a trainer that uses positive techniques vs. punishment. I hope that all goes well for him!

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Buddy
Cockapoo
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Showing teeth
Aggression
anxiety

I got my dog Buddy when he was 4 months. When we first met him he was scared of humans almost as if he was terrified of even his previous owners (the people we bought Buddy off of) and he would growl at us. We knew right away that something bad was happening and had to bring him into our home to save him. The first few days we had him we realized he has never been around other dogs or humans and it seemed like his crate we bought him was his safe zone. He spent majority of his time in there for the first week we had him (keep in mind the crate door was open at all times) Then we started to see more aggressions in him, he would bite my sister at night time when she would get up to grab a drink of water, he would be terrified to go down to ANY basement (he would grip onto our shoulders because we would have to carry him and he would have a light shake to him), he would bite us if we tried picking him up, and whenever we would go on walks he will even jump up to other people just walking by us and try biting them. He's an excellent dog though. He knows how to sit, twirl, paw, speak, play dead, lay down, stay and many more. He is now 1 years old and we notice he's way better with people but is very territorial when people would come near our house (barking, trying to bite etc). We want him to get better because he's still biting my sister unexpectedly during night time or even when someone walks by and he's laying down, relaxing he will go insanely aggressive, biting to break skin.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
The problem with taking in a dog like this is that you’re never going to fully know what happened to them in the past and what possible triggers they may have; it will take time to break Buddy of these habits but they may still occur in certain circumstances. I’ve added a few training guides below which go into different types of training which you may find useful and at the bottom of the page you may ask a certified dog trainer a question for further follow up. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-attacking https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-other-dogs https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-another-dog

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Angel
Maltese Shih Tzu
9 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

I have a Maltese Shitzu who is 9 months old, she is an affectionate dog during the day, but during the night especially after her dinner she gets aggressive when my kids try to put leash on her to take her out or even pick up. She becomes more aggressive between her dinner and bed time, sometimes hard to get hard to get her into her playpen to sleep. We do take her for a walk everyday and kids play with her during the day and tries to tire her out.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
At 9 months old, I suspect that Angel is testing her boundaries, and now is a very important time to correct that behavior. It would be best to hire a trainer to work with her, and teach all of you how to communicate so that this problem gets better and not worse. Angel is just a puppy, and she should be able to learn very quickly what is appropriate behavior and what isn't. If you need to find a trainer, your veterinarian should be able to recommend one, and you just want to make sure that your trainer uses positive reinforcement techniques, and not punishment.

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Marv
Rottweiler/Great Pyrenees
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

bedtime aggression (snarls/growls)

Medication Used

none

I have a half Rottweiler, half Great Pyrenees who is about 2.5 years old. The past few months he has developed a "bedtime aggression." He sleeps in bed with us and we go to bed at the same time, so there isn't an issue of him being startled awake. We have a king sized bed, granted he's a large 130lb dog, but there's plenty of room for the 3 of us. As soon as we turn off the lights and are ready to go to sleep, the slightest movement sets him off. Rolling over, adjusting the covers, etc. has him growling, snarling, and sometimes snapping at us. He's never actually bitten us and I don't think he will. He's honestly the sweetest, most loving dog during the day. I've started making him get off of the bed and submitting to me and then sleeping on the floor. I'm not sure if this will correct the situation, but I don't want him to continue this behavior. He's been to the vet and is medically very healthy. We live in the middle of nowhere, so a dog behaviorist is not an option. Any ideas on correcting such behavior?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Taking control after these episodes and forcing him to sleep on the floor is in my mind the best course of action, although it may not resolve the problem; each case is different and I would continue with the actions you’re currently taking to show that the behaviour isn’t wanted. It may be that you need to leave him in his own bed each night in your room so that this behaviour doesn’t continue. On the article below near the bottom there is a section where you may ask a free questions to a certified dog trainer for any follow up. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-rottweiler-to-not-be-aggressive

Hi, I am commenting because I have a half husky/pitbull mix (2 years old), and I am currently experiencing the same thing with him. He is so sweet during the day, but at night time, he starts to startle and growl more (especially in bed). I was wondering if you have found anything to fix this?

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Carl
Beagle
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Biting and growling at night

Our 3 YO beagle has been having "night terrors". Never towards people, only towards our other dog (a 2 YO yellow lab). In the middle of the night, if the lab moves on the bed, the beagle begins growling, biting, and snarling at him. As soon as the lights are flipped on the beagle stops. He is not aggressive any other time of day. They are kenneled together during the day, eat and play together perfectly fine all day long. It's not every night, only occasionally.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Since Carl only seems to have this problem at night, and occasionally, it might make sense to keep him kenneled at night to prevent this from happening. If that isn't possible, or it he is showing aggression otherwise, it may be a good idea to work with him with a trainer.

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Turtle
American Pit Bull Terrier
2 Years
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Growling Biting Barking

My wife and i adopted a American Pit-bull mix named Turtle. He is around two and a half years old. We have had him for a week as of today and he is a wonderful dog. Last night my wife and I took him for a walk and switched who was holding the leash on the way back. I walked him away from the house and she walked him home. We took him in and switched to a longer leash to take him into the backyard to use the restroom before he was put in his kennel for the night. We both went out back with him and our back deck light went out because it is a motion light. I had the leash and my wife walked over to trip the sensor to make the light come back on and he then became aggressive toward her. He was trying very hard to attack her, barking and growling and I believe he would have attacked her. I originally thought it may have been the the light shinning from behind her making her hard to see at first, but we tried again. I had her walk out on the back deck with us but made her wait on the back deck as I took him out to do his business. once I got him to the corner of the yard and gave the command go potty he saw her on the porch and became aggressive again. I walked him over to her make sure he could see her and he remained aggressive toward her. She went inside and I walked him away. I walked him around to calm down and then took him in and it was like it never happened. The foster couple he was with only know that he was found wondering around the downtown area and has never shown any form of aggression before. They had him for two months and his medical/vet records are in good health. He is smart and loves treats and learns now commands so well but my wife suffers from anxiety and it has made a major change in her trust with him and I dont know what to do. The environment is new to him and I have been working with him on the leash and heeling as well as getting him into a food and potty schedule. We are crate training him and he like his crate and dose very well at cuing us when he needs to go out. He is almost bomb proof, until tonight.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It would be a shame if Turtle couldn’t stay with you because of this aggressive behaviour and your wife’s anxiety; this is certainly a behavioural issue and does need work to resolve. Look through the training guides below from our website to get some pointers on possible courses of action plus on each article you may ask a certified dog trainer a question if you need any follow up. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-attacking https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-to-not-bite https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-to-not-jump https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-rottweiler-to-not-be-aggressive (I know it says Rottweiler but the principle is the same)

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Harley
Pom-A-Pug
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

Within the last month my little dog Harley has become very aggressive towards my bigger dog Alice at night when she goes near him. It is after they go out and come back in to get a treat. Alice cannot go near him or his bed without him attacking her. I usually can stop his aggression b my calling their names over the growling and barking. It has gotten worse, last night they refused the command to their names I had to physically take them apart and Harley refuses to let aggression go. I normally can calm him down by petting him and talking to him. This has also stopped working. He was on antibiotics for urinary tract infection for 5 weeks two different antibiotics he has been off those for about a week now. The aggression started when he first showed symptoms of infection but has not shown anymore symptoms and test came back clear. What can I do to help his aggression?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Behavioural issues are never easy to control and may require physical action on your side to restrain Harley to show him that the behaviour is unwanted; you need to be persistent with the restraint and ensure that he gets the message. Check the link below and there is a section on that page where you may ask a certified dog trainer a question for follow up. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-other-dogs

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Finn
French Bulldog
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Aggression

I have a 2 year old frenchie. Super social with other dogs, loves to snuggle and basic training was a success. About 6 months ago he randomly bit me after a toy was taken away from him and then again 2 months later after a similar incident. He started to hide with his toys under tables so we decided to take his toys away as we realized he was being possessive. He recently started what we call “protecting” people by getting in front of them and barking if anyone approaches. Problem is that one minute he could be protecting you and the other he can be attacking and protecting someone else. A week ago he started growling at night time if you petted him. If you repremend him at any point he hides and starts shaking. All of these sudden behaviors are really confusing us and would like our sweet boy back.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
There is no simple solution to these issues, normally there is a trigger which set off this behaviour; however it can be difficult to narrow in on a specific cause and may require observation by yourself to see if anything occurs before this behaviour starts. There is no specific advice I can give and would recommend you have a look at our training guides to see if there is anything applicable to Finn and ask our certified dog trainer a follow up question at the bottom of the first link. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/not-fear-bite https://wagwalking.com/training/behavior

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