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What is Urinating in His Bed?

A dog urinating in his own bed refers to the release of the dog’s own urine into his normal sleeping space, and is often more than just a small leak. This indicates a disturbance, not only for you, but also for the dog. It is not normal for a dog to urinate in his own bed, even as a puppy. The cause is probably not marking, submissive urination, or lack of house training, but a deeper problem, potentially medical. 

  • Emotional issues
  • Incontinence
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Kidney disease
  • Arthritis

Your dog may urinate in his own bed while he sleeps, releasing only a small amount or a full bladder of urine. He may also choose to purposely urinate in his own bed while he is awake; the cause is different in each case. Your dog may be stressed because of various emotional issues, or he may be experiencing a more serious underlying condition which will require veterinary assessment and treatment.

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Why Urinating in His Bed Occurs in Dogs

A dog may urinate in his own bed for three general reasons. He might be stressed by a current or recent occurrence. There may be a problem with the dog’s urinary tract. Or there may be a deeper, more systemic issue.

Emotional Issues

A dog may urinate in his own bed if he is experiencing stress, anxiety, fear of abandonment, or grief, such as for the passing of another dog in the family. Anxiety can be caused by changes in a dog’s physical environment, loud noises, such as the sound of fireworks, thunder, or vacuum cleaners, separation from his pet parent, being left completely alone and isolated, or travel. Even emotionally stable dogs can have problems with anxiety, but if experienced repeatedly, anxiety can develop into post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emotionally disturbing events that might lead to PTSD can include being attacked by another animal, being in a natural disaster, or witnessing violence to a close friend of any species. 

Incontinence

A dog may urinate in his own bed involuntarily, typically while relaxed or sleeping, if the urethral sphincter begins to fail. In this condition, muscles that involuntarily close the dog’s urethra stop working properly and no longer contract, allowing urine to leak. This usually happens in spayed female dogs of large breeds, but can happen in any dog. Often the result of physical deterioration associated with aging, this can also be related to neurological problems, tumors and infections in the bladder, and various anatomical causes.

Arthritis

A dog with arthritis may experience so much pain from standing up and walking that he opts to urinate in his own bed rather than stand up and go outside. Arthritis is usually a result of normal wear and tear on a dog’s joints taking a toll with age. One in five dogs will develop arthritis. The most common forms of arthritis involve degeneration or inflammation of the joints.

Urinary Tract Infection

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is caused by bacteria adhering to and multiplying inside the dog’s urinary tract. A UTI is more likely to develop when a dog suffers from a variety of other conditions, such as diabetes, tumors, bladder stones, and stress, among others. Females are more likely than males to suffer from urinary tract infections. 

Kidney Disease

Kidney disease can be either acute or chronic, and in both cases results from the kidneys failing to eliminate toxins from the dog’s bloodstream. Acute kidney disease is sudden and sometimes can be reversed, while chronic kidney disease develops more gradually and cannot be cured. It can occur for many different reasons, including an obstruction of the urinary tract, ingestion of a toxic substance, poor diet, organs deteriorating with age, and high blood pressure. Some breeds are more likely to inherit chronic kidney disease, including the Samoyed, Shih Tzu, Poodle, Rottweiler, Cocker Spaniel, and the Doberman Pinscher.

What to do if your Dog is Urinating in His Bed

If your dog is urinating in his own bed because of stress, anxiety, or other emotional problems, the first line of defense is interactive. Comfort or distract your dog. Try speaking to him in a low, soothing voice, play music designed to relax dogs, take him out for a nice walk, or just spend time together. An anxious dog needs to have his attention taken away from the disturbing stimulus. In extreme and intractable cases, a veterinary evaluation may be indicated. Your dog’s soiled bed must be either thoroughly cleaned or disposed of. Consider providing your dog with a waterproof bed.

If your dog is experiencing incontinence due to aging, medication may be the most effective treatment. Your veterinarian might prescribe ephedrine or phenylpropanolamine to strengthen the urethral sphincter; these are marketed under different names as commercial medicines. Hormone replacement medications may also be effective. Medication will be prescribed on a trial basis at first, and is effective for 70% of incontinent dogs.

Arthritis must be treated with diet, exercise, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). Exercise may include physiotherapy and water therapy, such as the dog walking on a treadmill while its legs and part of its torso are underwater. Acupuncture, laser treatment, or ultrasound, magnetic, or stem cell therapies may also be indicated. Many arthritic dogs respond very well to a trained and licensed acupuncturist. 

A urinary tract infection is treated primarily with antibiotics. Make sure that your dog can empty his bladder when urinating, as bacteria must be flushed from your dog’s system. If the infection is severe, your dog may need pain medication, and a urine culture should be done several days after the treatment has been completed, to be sure that the infection has cleared.

Kidney disease is always a serious condition, though the treatment differs, depending on whether it is acute or chronic. If your dog has acute kidney failure, hospitalization may be indicated, and your dog will receive fluid therapy to flush toxins from its body. In severe cases, your veterinarian may recommend dialysis. Chronic kidney disease will also require fluid therapy, possibly through the administration of subcutaneous fluids on an outpatient basis. Your dog may be prescribed a low protein and low phosphorus diet.

Prevention of Urinating in His Bed

To prevent emotional trauma for your dog, keep him away from things that typically frighten dogs, such as fireworks, moving skateboards, and vacuum cleaners. A garment with a snug fit can help your dog to feel secure. 

Incontinence, arthritis, bacterial infections, and kidney disease are not normally preventable, as many dogs develop these conditions as their bodies age and deteriorate. Always provide your dog with a healthy diet and clean fresh water, keep him at a healthy weight, and prevent injuries. Carefully monitor and supervise your dog so you are aware early on of any changes that occur.

Cost of Urinating in His Bed

If your dog is urinating in his own bed because of emotional distress, there may be no need for medication or veterinary treatment. Incontinence, arthritis, and kidney disease will require veterinary treatment. The average cost of treating incontinence and arthritis is $300. The average cost of treating kidney disease is $7000. 

 

Urinating in His Bed Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Remy
Beagle
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

toilet

We recently adopted this beautiful dog and take him for evening walks where he wees alot and gets let out again for toilet before bed, he is put to bed in the laundry and he seems to sometimes wee on his bed by the morning. It means I have to wash all his blankets and his bed almost every day.
What could be the reason for this?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
There are various causes for urinating on his bed which may include behavioural marking, stress/anxiety (especially if you don’t know what his history is), urinary tract infections, weak bladder among other issues. You should get Remy checked over by your Veterinarian to be on the safe side to look for any medical issues, but if there is a behavioural component it may take a lot of work to get to the bottom of it. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Benji
Cavachon mix
18 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating in bed

Hi there, I have a 18 month old cavachon mix who has recently started urinating in his bed and on all his belongings, even his food bowl. He has never been easy to train since we got him when he was 4 months old. When we first got him we lived in a small flat and after around a month we got him to use his pads which have always been kept in the kitchen were he also sleeps. A few months ago we moved to a house and he was great, the kitchen was bigger and he loves getting into the front garden during the day to do his business out there and at night he’ll go on his pads. However, this past month or so, he’s slowly gotten worse out of nowhere, having accidents all over kitchen but these past 2 weeks have been the worst as all he does is pee on his belongings - on his bed, toys and he will even knock his food bowl over and pee on top of it. He is both mine and my mum’s dog and she’s just about had it with him, she can be quite tough on him sometimes, however he’s quite used to it and after she shouts at him he stays away from her for a whole of ten seconds before he’ll run back over to her and play nice. We really need some advice though because I do worry she’ll give up with him and I won’t have much of a say. If you have any advice it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
If Benji is urinating only on his stuff and not on anything else making a conscious decision to do so is certainly a behavioural issue which makes it very difficult to determine a specific rationale in Benji’s mind for this; house training and punishment is required to enforce the training but I have no quick fix for you unfortunately, we have many training guides (see link below) but nothing specific for a behavioural cause. It would be good to check in with your Veterinarian to check for any possible medical causes for this like urinary tract infections or kidney disease. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/behavior

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Zoe
Dachshund
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

no symptoms

Hi, I have a 2 yr old Doxie named Zoe, she has always urinated on the pad with no issues. She came to us at 8 weeks old already pad trained. Recently she has begun scratching on her pad (which she has always done) but then she will run to her bed and urinate on it instead. We have had no changes in the house, the pad is kept in a tray, and she always has access to it. My husband and I are stumped. Please advise if possible.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1057 Recommendations
That is unusual behavior to begin suddenly. It would probably be a good idea to have her examined by your veterinarian and have a urine sample analyzed to make sure that there isn't an underlying cause for her to have started to have this problem. If her urine is healthy, it would be a good idea to get rid of that bed, as the smell from her urine will be very difficult to get rid of, and she may continue to urinate there until the smell is gone.

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Bella
Borzio
9 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Stubborn

Our Borzio puppy (9 months) Bella intentionally peed on her bed last night. My husband took her for a 30 minute walk. She did not pee at all. When she got home, she wanted to get on the couch, which is a no no in our house, and we had to remove her twice. That is when she peed in her bed. A full bladders worth. She had not peed in the house in 3 months. This is why we believe it was deliberate. She made no effort to disguise it. She did it right in front of me. Advice or thoughts on how to prevent this from happening again?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
Intentional peeing may be caused by her disapproval of something in the home or marking an area; but you should punish her and ensure that the stain is thoroughly cleaned to remove the smell as the may urinate there again. I’ve placed a guide below to not peeing on the rug, I don’t have a specific one but the principles are the same; there is also a section to ask a question to a certified dog trainer as well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/not-pee-on-the-rug

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Rennie
Cocker Spaniel
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating In House
Cant Get Up

My 13 year old cocker spaniel continues to wet the bed at night. I have thrown out countless beds and I don't know how to help him. He has arthritis and is blind and deaf. What can I do to help him not have accidents? I want him to have a soft bed but hate that he wakes up covered in urine at night. I'm told he's in great health for his age by my vet but am worried because urine is acidic and can cause skin infections.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1057 Recommendations
If Rennie has not had any lab work done recently, it would be a good idea to see your veterinarian and have his blood and urine analyzed. He may have a bladder infection, or he may have a systemic disease causing him to urinate more, and those things well need to be treated to stop him from urinating on his bedding. I hope that he is okay.

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Alice
Beagle
2 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Hello! I have an 2 years old beagle female. She kept wetting her bed in her sleep. After having urine and blood tests the vet concluded she had UTI and gave her a 21 days antibiotics treatment. While she was taking the treatment my boyfriend was out of town and she did not have any accidents. He has been back for a couple of days and the problem reappeared. We went to the vet but there are no signs of UTI . My boyfriend is more harsh on her as she needs to be better trained and he is only following the advice the dog trainer gave us. He never hit her or anything like that. She does have a submissive behavior when it comes to him as sometimes she pees only if he pets her. She had the same behavior towards the dog trainer. We would need some advice as we don’t know what to do anymore. I am tired to washing her bed every morning and I want to understand this behavior and how we could help her.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
This certainly sounds like the behavioural issue, we have an article on our site linked below on controlling submissive peeing; at the bottom of the page there is a section where you can ask a certified dog trainer a question if you need any clarification. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-submissive-peeing

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Simba
Pomeranian
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

peeing the bed

We have recently taken on a new adopted dog. He is 6.5years pomeranian/ pekingese who had come from a very stable background and only given up because his owner passed away. We had him for a month and now he has started peeing in his bed on purpose. He doesn't seem stressed and he is very energetic and doesn't seem sick.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
There are various reasons for a dog to urinate on his bed, but if he is making a conscious effort then it may be just behavioural which needs to be addressed with training. Obviously if there is no improvement with training you should visit your Veterinarian to look for evidence of a medical cause for this urination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Amber
mongrel
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

wetting

Hello, 9 months ago we adopted Amber a rescue dog from eastern Europe. She is a 2 year old Labrador cross and is very nervous in various situations, we are unable to walk her around other dogs and she is very nervous of our cat who now has to live upstairs. For the past 3 months Amber has started wetting her bed every night and sometimes during the day whilst fast asleep. We think she may be suffering from PTSD as we were warned before we had her that she has probably witnessed some very violent situations in the dog pounds. Do you have any advice on how we can help her?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
These types of cases are never easy and there is rarely a quick fix, it is a case of ensuring that you time trips outside well, showing disapproval of urination and offering reassurance whenever Amber is scared. I wish I had a quick fix, but all you can do is take her out frequently and thoroughly wash all bedding after each urination episode. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/condition/post-traumatic-stress-disorder https://wagwalking.com/training/not-pee-at-night (general advice)

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Naboo
French Bulldog
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating In House
Urinating In House , bed wetting

Hi, we have 2 French Bulldogs, both aged 7. Our dog (Omar) has always been pretty clean, but our bitch (Naboo) constantly pees in her own bed and also in Omar's as they don't seem too fussy as to which bed they sleep in. They sleep together in the kitchen. Is there a spray we could use that may deter her from doing this?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
You need to first determine whether the urination is intentional or not, if it is intentional you need to determine whether she is just urinating because she wants to or is squatting because she cannot hold it any longer; if she urinates in her sleep or whilst walking there most likely is a medical issue there. Multiple reasons may lead a dog to keep urinating in a particular place, many times smell; you should clean both beds on a high temperature wash and steam clean if possible to try and remove any odour. If the cause is medical, you would need to discuss with your Veterinarian whether it is hormonal, neurological or other cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Zoe
Australian Cattle
7 Weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Peeing in bed

We have a 7 week old Australian Cattle Dog that we are trying to crate train. She does fine in the crate and will even go in during the day on her own. The problem is, she pees her bed multiple times each night. She will whine or paw at the crate to go outside and we take her, but she only goes poo outside. Her bed will already be wet and she won't use the yard to pee. Any suggestions?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
Seven weeks is still quite young and you need to be patient, I know it is frustrating but it is just a case of continuing training like you have been doing; if there is no improvement over a period of weeks or months then there may be a medical issue. The link below refers to a Beagle puppy but the principles are the same for any breed, have a look through and there is a section at the bottom where you can ask a certified dog trainer a question regarding behavioural issues. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/crate-train-a-beagle-puppy

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Bella
Labrador Shepherd
5 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating in bed and Anxi

Bella is a 5 month lab Shepherd mix And before she had done really well potty training and she’s always been very anxious and now she evens wets her bed .. Should I be concerned?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
If Bella is urinating in her bed, you need to make it clear that this is not accepted behaviour and you should clean the bed each time to remove the smell of urine so that she doesn’t continue to urinate there for that reason. Anxiety may cause some behaviour like urination to occur, make sure that you have Bella on a urination routine and is let out regularly to do her business. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Rain
Doberman Pinscher
6 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Bed wetting

I have a female Doberman 6 months for the past 2 months has been wetting in her bed, she will randomly wet at night doesn’t matter in what, we have tried cratering her, she weed in that, left in front room, she will pee in her bed in there, we’ve tried putting her in the kitchen, same thing. We’ve left crate door open, seems to be no trigger, she happy and content. Help it’s driving me mad

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
The bed needs to be cleaned thoroughly in the washing machine, with a steam cleaner or other effective method because if Rain keeps smelling the urine she will continue to urinate there. I don’t have a training guide yet on not urinating on the bed but we have one for night time which is linked below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/training/not-pee-at-night

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Daisy
Boston Terrier
15 Days
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating in bed

Medication Used

Soloxine

Hello!

We have a 15 year old Boston Terrier - Daisy. Lately she has been digging frantically in her bed (and on pillows she pulls down onto the floor) and then full-blown urinating on the spot she "dug". She is almost completely deaf, takes thyroid meds but otherwise healthy. Her doctor cannot find a medical reason for this behavior - says it may be cognitive. She also sometimes becomes very anxious and burrows through things - for instance she will empty all the trash cans and burrow through my closets. We have no idea what causes these outburst. One other thing - she had a bout with vestibular disease about a year ago and she still had a bit of a head tilt. Do you have any suggestions for keeping her from urinating in her bed? Many thanks!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
This may not be able to be controlled, you can try cleaning her bed so that there are no smells associated with urine for her to go back to; but given her age and the nature of the urination it is possible it isn’t reversible. Apart from cleaning her bed, I cannot think of anything else you can do to prevent this; try to look out for a trigger that causes this behaviour and then try to remove the trigger if possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bella
Jack Russell pomaranian
18 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating in bed

We have had Bella a Jack Russel x Pomeranian for approx 8 months and took her on as her fifth family she will be 2 in July so hasn’t had the most stable of starts in life. She has always been very needy and affectionate towards us however she used to be very very submissive even if I was telling our children off she’d instantly squat and pee, her house training wasn’t the best. She has come on leaps and bounds since she has become part of the family however the one issue we have struggled with is peeing in the bed she has always been kept in a crate so we kept that up, one of her previous families kept her in there for very long periods so we come to the conclusion that was the cause of the stress so we have moved her out the crate and she still pees in her bed we have even bought her a new bed and every night she pees. She hasn’t had any accidents in the house for a sustained period of time she is very good at letting us know it’s timd to go out but as Soon As she goes to bed it’s pee time

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1057 Recommendations
This may be a hard habit to break for her, given her rough start. One thing that might help is to take her for a long walk before bed, and make sure that she is stimulated to urinate. If her bladder is empty, she may not be motivated to urinate in her bed, since she seems to be doing so well otherwise.

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Luna
Labrador
5 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Bed wetting

We have a puppy 5 months old lab mix we got her as an 8wk old puppy, she's recently been allowed to sleep on the bed with us. The last couple of nights my husband has been away and she has peed on our bed while sleeping, she doesn't ask to go out, and she has no problem sleeping on the same spot. What can I do? She's bonded with me more than my husband so I don't think she's worried about him being gone.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
There are a few possible causes for incontinence and with Luna being a Labrador I would recommend checking for ectopic ureters as the condition usually presents around this age and is overrepresented in female Labradors. You should have an examining regardless and an intravenous pyelogram if your Veterinarian suspects ectopic ureters. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/condition/ectopic-ureters http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/correcting-ectopic-ureters-juvenile-dogs

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Tanner
Cockapoo
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

lack of bladder control

My dog just peed in his bed that he's had for years. He NEVER has accidents. He's 11 and has been potty trained since he was a puppy. He's had the same bed for a few years now and it's where he sleeps. We've also been living in this apartment for 7 months now and he's never tried to mark territory either.
Every night he typically scratches at his bed, turns in a few circles, then lays down for the night. This time after he scratched he started peeing. Why?
(I had taken him out to do his business a couple hours prior so it wasn't like his bladder was full and he couldn't hold it)

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
This type of issue may be a behavioural problem or a medical problem; it may be that Tanner couldn’t hold himself due to incontinence or that he was marking his bed (for a reason known only to him). I cannot say what type of problem this is from a one off event, but if this continues you should visit your Veterinarian to determine if there is a medical cause related to aging, infections, urinary stones, tumours, spinal issues or another cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Grim
chihuahua mix
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

peeing in spots besides pad
Pacing
anxious

Hi, My dog is 1 years and 1 month old. He is a chihuahua mix rat terrier.
He is 100% potty trained but He just started to pee a little in his bed and in a small spot in our living room. I'm pretty sure he has anxiety. My mom punished him for doing his business like that. She put him behind a baby gate. What should I do??

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1057 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining Grim, I can't say for sure what might be going on with him. It would be best to have him seen by a veterinarian and checked for an infection or another problem. If he has a urinary tract infection, he may not be able to help what is happening, and punishing him for it won't help. I hope that all goes well for him.

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Belle
French Bulldog
5 Months
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

anxious

I recently bought a 5 month old puppy, she came from the same home her parents were in. She will not pee on a puppy pad or outside she will only pee in het bed. Dhe can hold it for hpurs and drinks alot but then chooses to wee in her bed. Especially at night , she has a crate with her bed and a puppy pad but chooses to urinate on her bed. We need help please. She is an ancious dog and doesnt like to be on her own. At night she sleeps in her crate in our bedroom or she howls all night. She follows us round during day and just wants to be with us all the time.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
This issue is more behavioural than medical, you may need to restrict access to her bed during the day and leave her in her crate with puppy pads so that when she has no option to go you can praise her for the use of the puppy pad. You also may need to change her bed to a different one if she has associated the sight and smell of it with urination. You may also need to consult with a Trainer to help as well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jacob
Chihuahua
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Our chihuahua has never been 100% potty trained but it has suddenly gotten way out of hand and he has started peeing on our couch and blankets and I even watched him run to his own bed and pee. Does this sound medical related or out of spite? We have a new baby but she is 5 months old now and he just started this the past few weeks and she isn't the first either, it's baby #4! He rarely gets attention anymore because he doesn't let the kids pet him and we are always busy with the kids but this a new low :-\

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1057 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Jacob may have a medical condition that needs treatment. It would be best to have him evaluated by your veterinarian and have some testing done to evaluate his urine, kidneys, blood sugar, and systemic function. It may be all the changes in the house, but he may have a urinary tract infection or a disease that is causing him to urinate more. Your veterinarian will be able to examine him and guide you in any treatments that he may need.

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Flora
Husky
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Incontinence

My dog is a Dalmatian cross husky, she will be 7 in Jan. We adopted her 2 years ago from the spca. She came from a home where she was ignored into a busy loving home with 3 kids who walk and cuddle with her all the time. She is a great dog. There have been some changes the last few months with me going back to work and us adopting a kitten in June, she likes cats more then dogs and we didn't want her left alone in the house. The last 4-5 months she has been peeing in the house. Only in the front room on the carpet and her bed. We have taken her to the vet and they can not explain what is happening other then she is aging. How can we help our puppy!?!? We are really concerned because she won't even move after she pees, she just lays in it.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read and respond

Elizabeth

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2479 Recommendations
Cases of ‘incontinence’ may be due to ageing but many times are attributable to a behavioural issue like separation anxiety, stress or another factor. If the urination started after you went back to work or the introduction of the kitten, that may be a precipitating factor; you should think about other changes which have occurred around the home which may be causing distress. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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