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What is Tooth Removal?

Whilst many canine dental problems can be solved with a proper cleaning of the mouth, sometimes a more drastic solution is required to ensure the dog's wellbeing. Surgical removal of a dog's tooth is usually seen as a last resort after all other treatment methods have been found ineffective. When a vet advises a tooth is removed, it is because they know it is the best thing for the patient.

Tooth pain can be expensive to treat. If you suspect your dog has dental problems or is at risk, start searching for pet insurance today. Brought to you by Pet Insurer, Wag! Wellness lets pet parents compare insurance plans from leading companies like PetPlan and Trupanion. Find the “pawfect” plan for your pet in just a few clicks!

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Tooth Removal Procedure in Dogs

A general anesthetic is required before surgery can proceed. The vet will then assess the root structure of the tooth using oral x-rays in order to plan the extraction. The tooth is usually pulled out by pulling back the gums and using a drill to dislodge the root from its mooring in the jawbone. An incision along the base of the gums may be required to assist in this. Once freed from the jawbone, the tooth can be pulled out and any root fragments removed. The final step is to suture the wound closed. The procedure should usually take no more than an hour in total.

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Efficacy of Tooth Removal in Dogs

By extracting the entirety of the affected tooth, surgical removal of a dog's tooth will usually eliminate the problem altogether (although antibiotics will be required in the event of infection). Whilst other teeth may be at risk of developing similar problems (especially if the dog has poor dental health in general), the vet will almost certainly go over some preventative options with the owner.

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Tooth Removal Recovery in Dogs

Following surgery, the dog will require a regular dosage of painkillers due to the fact that several nerve endings will have been severed during the procedure. Furthermore, owners should monitor their dog over the next few weeks to make sure that they are recovering properly. Warning signs include wincing and continued bleeding (caused by the wound opening up again), as well as facial swelling (which may be indicative of an infection). There will be a couple of follow-up visits required in order for the vet to check that the incision is healing properly. Sutures should dissolve with time and the vet will check to ensure this has happened.. All told, the healing process should take approximately two weeks to complete.

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Cost of Tooth Removal in Dogs

The price of tooth extraction can cost anywhere between $500 and $800. The cost of the procedure fluctuates depending on the overall health of the individual dog, their size and the potential complexity of the required tooth or teeth removal.

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Dog Tooth Removal Considerations

Whilst a tooth extraction is a relatively quick and straightforward operation, there are a couple of aspects that may give some dog owners pause for thought. The first is the necessity of general anesthetic - something that can be especially dangerous to older dogs (who are also the most likely to require the operation) or those with underlying health issues. Second is the question of whether extraction is appropriate in their specific case. Remember though, an extraction will only be advised by a vet when they feel it is in your dog' best interest. If your vet has told you your dog needs an extraction, the longer the tooth is left in their mouth, the higher the risk of significant infection and chronic pain.

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Tooth Removal Prevention in Dogs

Although some types of infections (such as those incurred from injuries or foreign bodies) are unforeseeable, maintaining a good standard of dental health in your dog will prevent the most common conditions that precipitate tooth extraction. Ensuring that your animal eats good quality food and receives regular dental cleaning will prevent the buildup of harmful grime and bacteria in the mouth, saving them from the pain of tooth decay and infection. 

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Tooth Removal Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Miniature Pinscher

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Four Years

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Unknown severity

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3 found helpful

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Infected Canine

My dog is between 20-30 pounds she has one bad tooth on the right side that needs to be pulled cause it hurts her and is possibly causing an infection

Sept. 26, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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3 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I apologize for the delay, this venue is not set up for urgent emails. That is not uncommon, and many dogs do need dental work. She will probably be more comfortable once the tooth is taken care of. It would be best to have your pet seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get treatment for them.

Oct. 16, 2020

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Beagle

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Nine Years

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Unknown severity

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2 found helpful

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Noisy Breathing

My dog recently has 11 teeth extracted. It’s two weeks later and now she is breathing heavily and seems to be struggling to get a breath. Why would this be ?

Aug. 11, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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2 Recommendations

Thank you for your question . I'm sorry that she is having these troubles. Without being able to see her, it is hard to say what might be going on, it sounds like it is possible that she may have some sort of infection or congestion in her nasal passages, if some of those teeth were on the upper part of her mouth. It would probably be best to have a recirc with your veterinarian, as they can look at her, see what might be causing this problem, and get her any medication she needs so that she is more comfortable again. I hope that all goes well for her and she feels better soon.

Aug. 11, 2020

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