Fluid In The Abdomen Average Cost

From 362 quotes ranging from $200 - 2,000

Average Cost

$850

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What is Fluid In The Abdomen?

Fluid in the abdomen is also known as abdominal effusion or “ascites”. This is not a disease, but a reaction to an underlying condition. All cats have a certain amount of fluid in the abdomen, to protect the internal organs. When this fluid builds up to dangerous levels, it is known as ascites.

Cats can have a variety of medical conditions that may require treatment. While most cats do not encounter serious health problems, some develop conditions that will require medical intervention. If you cat has fluid in his abdomen, he may exhibit specific symptoms that must be investigated by a veterinarian to ensure your cat’s recovery. 

Symptoms of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

Ascites causes your cat to be uncomfortable and he may display certain symptoms that relay that message. Here are some of the most common symptoms associated with fluid in the abdomen in domestic cats:

  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Overall weakness
  • Groaning noises while in a lying position
  • Abdominal distention 
  • Discomfort when the abdominal area is pressed
  • Male cats may have swollen scrotum
  • Difficulty breathing

Causes of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

There are a variety of medical conditions or diseases that can cause your cat to develop fluid in his abdomen. Below are some of the most common causes of abdominal effusion in cats:

  • Bleeding in the abdomen
  • Cancer
  • Diseases of the liver such as hepatitis or cirrhosis
  • Excessive loss of albumin due to kidney failure
  • Diseases of the heart, especially right sided heart failure
  • Infectious diseases such as feline infectious peritonitis
  • Nephritic syndrome

Diagnosis of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

In order to diagnose your cat, your veterinarian will need to obtain important information from you. He will need to know any information regarding your cat’s birth, pre-existing health conditions and the symptoms he has been exhibiting. Your doctor will also need to know when you first noticed symptoms, so he can determine how long the condition has been present. Vital signs will be taken at your doctor visit. Your doctor will check your cat’s weight, temperature, heart rate and rate of respiration. He will then examine your cat. The doctor will observe your cat’s behavior, neurological function and gait. He will palpate your cat’s abdomen, as well. 

Diagnostic tests will help your veterinarian determine the cause of abdominal effusion. He will draw a blood sample and run a complete biochemical profile and a CBC or complete blood count. A urine sample will be taken and evaluated, as well. 

Treatment of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

If your cat has a significant buildup of fluid in his abdomen, the first order of treatment is to remove it so he can be more comfortable. Your veterinarian will most likely perform a procedure known as abdominocentesis. During this procedure, your doctor will tap the abdomen with a fine needle and drain the fluid. If your cat does not have a large buildup of fluid and is otherwise stable, your doctor may treat him with diuretics to help him eliminate the fluid.

Once the fluid has been removed, your doctor will work to treat the cause of the condition. If your cat has bleeding in his abdomen, your doctor may perform surgery to stop it. This will prevent the blood from re-accumulating in the abdomen. Cancer causing tumors may require surgery, as well. Medications such as antibiotics may be necessary to treat conditions such as bacterial infections. 

Recovery of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

The length of time it will take your cat to recover depends on several factors. Some cats will undergo abdominocentesis and the problem will be resolved. Those cats feel better almost instantly and return to normal activity levels within a day or so. Cats that require surgery to remove tumors or to stop bleeding, will need several more weeks to recover. Your doctor may keep your cat in the hospital for a few days to give him medication and monitor his condition. Once he is stable enough to go home, your doctor will provide you with detailed instruction on how to care for him. If your cat has a bacterial infection that requires IV antibiotics, your cat may need to stay in the hospital for a few days, as well. Your doctor will send any needed medications home with you after discharge along with instructions on how to give them.

Some cats may need to be placed on a special diet that restricts sodium. This is because consuming excessive amounts of salt may cause your cat to retain water and cause fluid to re-accumulate. It is important that you follow these instructions to be sure your cat recovers fully. In addition, your doctor may want to see your cat every week or so to check for signs of fluid build-up. At these visits, it is important for you to tell your doctor about any unusual symptoms or changes in your cat’s eating pattern or behavior. Your cat will have a better chance of recovery when you and your veterinarian work as a team to care for him. 

Fluid In The Abdomen Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Kenny
Maine Coon
13 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Increased Urination
Gas
liver inflammation
Tense abdomen

Medication Used

Cosequin
Prednisolone
Viralys

My cat Kenny is a 13 yo Maine Coon. He’s been on a wet food diet due to a FLUTD scare about 5 years ago. He’s been drinking more water lately and both urinating and defecating outside the cat box. He’s been urinating more also. His vet diagnosed him with Kidney Disease on Tuesday after running a Urinalysis and awaiting complete blood panel. When his blood work came back, it was normal - creatinine was 1.1 and BUN 19. He has a tense abdomen and his vet said he peed when she pressed on it. We are waiting on his urine culture to come back to see if he has an infection since his urine was diluted (USG was 1028). His blood work also indicated a slightly inflamed liver (alkaline phosphatase 135, in May was 111). His AST, ALT, WBC, platelets and Thyroid levels were normal. We are waiting on his urine culture to come back but am a worried cat mom and wondering why his abdomen would be tense and what tests or recommendations you might suggest. They suggested an ultrasound but that is $600 and I just spent the same on all of these tests. Am also wondering if he actually has kidney disease if his diagnosis seemed to be only based on his USG and litter box habits and increased water consumption. He has also been gassy and have heard his tummy rumbling a few times. He’s been lethargic also for quite some time but he has arthritis, allergies, and asthma. No change in eating habits. He’s on a small dose of prednisolone given every few days or when he gets sneezing fits. Any ideas would be much appreciated.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
The two important kidney values are well within physiological range, but the increase in alkaline phosphatase may be indicative of another condition which may include liver, kidney (but unlikely), intestine or bone. With the tense abdomen; it may be due to tenderness of the liver, gas or another issue. Sometimes conditions with these vague symptoms and slightly elevated values can be misleading; I would try him on Denamarin for his liver to see if that helps to bring down his alkaline phosphatase level. An ultrasound would be valuable, but it is expensive; it would however allow your Veterinarian to look at the structure of the liver, kidneys and other organs. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM http://veterinarycalendar.dvm360.com/diagnostic-approach-dogs-with-increased-alp-activity-proceedings

Thanks for the quick response! His culture came back today and tested positive for E. coli. Started him on 25mg Zenequin, which he will be on for 2 weeks. After that we will be doing another round of tests to make sure everything cleared up. Overall good news as he may not have kidney disease after all! Not sure why he would be defecating outside the box but his digestive tract might just be irritated.

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Kelso
Domestic shorthair
16 Weeks, Born June 21, 2017
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

I have a kitten that I rescued from a shelter at 14 weeks. He is now about 16 weeks old. When we adopted him, we knew he was sick and had ringworm so we decided to nurse back to health. When we got him, he had had a bloated belly for a few weeks before we got and and still has one. He has been to the vet 4 times and 3/4 of the vets did not think it was FIP. We went to the vet last night to get his final vaccination and she was very concerned that it was FIP and we did not do the vaccination. She did a fecal test and it was negative but she said that it was a tan color instead of dark brown. She has he was also very dehydrated but he's been drinking a lot of water. She also poked his belly for fluid and she found clear fluid, not sticky yellow. This vet is very concerned that our kitten has FIP. One of the kittens in the shelter died from FIP but that kitten was kept completely separate from ours so we do not believe he could've been exposed from that. Since we have got him, he has been slowly gaining weight, has gained so much energy and is acting like a kitten, his ringworm is clearing up, he eats well, he does not have diarrhea or vomiting. The shelter also told us last night that he fell from the stairs about 8-9 weeks ago and his abdominal fluid may have resulted from that? We don't want to believe that it is FIP since he eats well, is super energetic and playful, the fluid was clear, and the other vets weren't convinced that it was FIP. We have no idea what our next steps should be and do not have an absurd amount of money to spend since we our college students. We really need some advice on what our next steps should be. We thought he was doing so much better so this diagnosis was a huge surprise to us. Any advice will help, thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
Faecal testing for FIP isn’t reliable and a cat must be tested monthly for a period of five or six months to verify that it is either truly positive or negative for FIP. A cheaper test is a Rivalta’s test which is performed with distilled water, acetic acid and a drop of abdominal fluid (ascites); if the drop of abdominal fluid dissolves then the test is negative, if the drop floats/sinks intact/looks jellyfish like then the test is positive. Other causes of ascites need to be determined including peritonitis, liver disease, tumours, congenital anomalies among other disorders. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/generalized-conditions/feline-infectious-peritonitis/overview-of-feline-infectious-peritonitis

I'm taking him in to get blood work done this afternoon.

From what I explained above, if you were his vet, would you be overly concerned that its FIP?

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Diablo
domestic short hair
15 Years
Serious condition
2 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Diarrhea
cancer

Hi I have a 15+ year old male cat with lymphoma(large cell I believe) He's very thin, has diahrrea a lot, but is still eating like a champ. Right now the vet has told me he is pretty much in hospice care. His abdomen is huge and filled with fluid but they didn't want to train because they said it would just fill back up. Wondering if it would still benefit him/make him more comfortable to do it, how much on average does it cost, and in your opinion, at this point, would it be of benefit? I feel like I'm just letting him die:( Thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

Draining the abdomen will give some short term relief (easier to breath and less weight to carry around), but would fill up again and require regular draining if diuretics are not effective. Cost can vary widely depending on your location and Veterinarian but a call to your Veterinarian would clear this up. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you Dr. So much!

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Mingming
Persian
6 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Big tummy

Hi we dont know why our cat have big tummy seems like she is pregnant. She just gave birth few months ago and normally we leave him outside our villa. How i will know it she is pregnant or have some problem in her stomach.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations
A bloated or enlarged abdomen may be caused by another pregnancy, fluid accumulation or gas; it is possible to determine pregnancy by palpation but shouldn’t be attempted by owners. The link below offers some information on pregnancy detection in dogs and cats and is a useful guide to read through; ideally if you suspect that Mingming is pregnant, if is always best to check in with your Veterinarian. If you suspect that Mingming may be ill, again a visit to your Veterinarian is advised. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/management-and-nutrition/management-of-reproduction-small-animals/pregnancy-determination-in-small-animals

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Mimi
Tabby
15 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

No appetite
Weakness
Vomiting

Our 15 year old cat had fluid in her abdomen which was drained yesterday. A blood test was done which was normal (other than slight hyperthyroidism) and an ultrasound did not show any issues. Before the fluid was drained she was eating very well and in good spirits. However now that the fluid is drained, she refuses to eat and only drinks water which she immediately vomits out. She is also very weak and has trouble walking. The vet said to wait it out a day and return tomorrow if it is not better but I am wondering what could be causing such a change in the cat after the fluid was drained?
Thank you!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

The removal of fluid from the abdomen will cause lethargy in a cat (especially in a geriatric cat) due to an increase in cardiac output due to splanchnic hyperemia. The vasodilatation that occurs in the spleen leads to a lowering of blood pressure and a compensatory an increase in cardiac output causing the lethargy. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Briar
Shorthaired domestic
1 Year
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy
Fluid In Abdomen

Hi, I have a one year old cat. He just started showing signs that he has fluid in his abdomen a few days ago. We took him to the vet yesterday, and they did an ultrasound. They said that the fluid wasn't blood. They suspect that he has FIP. I've done some research, and I can't figure out why they think that since he's not showing any of the signs, except the abdominal swelling and lethargy (I'm guessing because moving with all that fluid in you is uncomfortable). He still purrs when I pet him. He even still likes getting his belly rubbed. We got him from a shelter, but he was only there for maybe 5 days tops, and that was a year ago. We don't have much money, so I'm trying to find out as much as I can before spending all kinds of it.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

Whilst there are many causes of ascites in cats, there are very few in younger cats with FIP being one of them; the symptoms may not all appear at once. A simple test would confirm or rule out FIP, but a standard blood test would show any problems with liver, kidney or protein levels which could all cause ascites. Regardless of the time spent in the shelter, a cat only needs a moment in a shelter to pick up an infectious disease. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Maui
Shorthaired domestic
6 Months
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Ear wax
Diarrhea
Pain
Gas
Nasal Discharge

My 6 month old kitten had diarrhea for a while, went to the vet and had her dewormed. Took a fecal test and found she had giardia. We gave her medicine for this too, still had mild diarrhea, so we switched her to a vet recommended bland diet. STILL saw diarrhea and she was very gassy. We are now noticing mild bloating in er that tummy and she seems uncomfortable lying down. What could this be? No vomiting, lethargy, or weight loss. She doesn't seem to have difficulty breathing.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

It is difficult to determine the possible causes of diarrhoea and abdominal swelling in a kitten if other causes have been ruled out like food intolerances and parasites. One cause which comes to mind is feline coronavirus which may cause diarrhoea, upper respiratory tract disease (the nasal discharge), lethargy, abdominal swelling and poor growth. Without examining Maui, it is hard to think of different causes, but with the development of abdominal swelling I would recommend revisiting your Veterinarian for further tests. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Canimsin
Domestic longhair
13 Years
Critical condition
-1 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

ascites

Hello Dr.
I have a 13 years old indoor male cat. He has fluid in abdomen. He does not eat, drink very little water. He is dehydrated and lost weight.
Our Dr. drained the fluid (650ml) and tested could not find any FIP, cancer cell nothing. Blood test did not show any cancer or FIP. Then X-ray and ultrasound did not show any specific organ has problem. Dr said there are some cloudy sections around the heart but cat does not have any abnormal heartbeat. His heart rate is good and there is no skip. Also he is breathing very well without any extra afford.
Dr gave him Convenia and Dexameth Sod Phos injections and appetite pill. Also Dr suggested IVF LRS under skin around 300mL a day to keep my cat hydrated so we can keep the kidneys healthy.
I gave my cat fluid under the skin for 7 days recommended dosage and I went back to Vet to check. Second time we removed almost 1L fluid from his abdomen.
As long as I gave my cat fluid under the skin he goes to pee (no pain) but not much ball movement.
This is 2nd week and he lost some more weight, still does not eat and drink water. I try to force feed with syringe but he does not want to eat. I tried small amounts very gently still did not eat. His mouth is very dry so I am giving the fluid under the skin (as directed by Dr and I watched many videos online).
I am working with our Dr closely doing everything by the book also watching videos how to treat cat in his condition so making sure my cat is not under stress or pain.
However he is not getting better. I am searching everywhere for a good solution to make him better before it is too late.
Please let me know if there is anything else we can safely try or we are missing some treatment.
Thank you for your time
Regards
Omer

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

The usual causes of ascites in cats are infectious diseases (like FIP), portal hypertension, right-sided heart failure, peritonitis, kidney failure, low blood protein, cancer, urinary tract rupture or liver disease; if not carried out already, a full blood profile would be valuable to check liver and kidney function as well as blood counts and protein levels. Given his age, there maybe age related causes due to aging. Without a full blood test result, I am unable to assist further. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you very much for quick response. First blood test did not show any thing but that was 2 weeks ago. Also I am not sure if the test was full blood profile. I will check back his Dr. again Monday morning.
Thank you again for your help.
Regards
Omer

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Cree
Black
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Fluid in Abdomen
Burst

My cat had fluid in his belly. We had test done yesterday so I will get the results in a few days. Yesterday his stomach was very large and hard. We had the vet give him an enima to reliev some pressure since he has a lot of feces he couldn't push out. Well this morning I woke up and his belly isn't distended anymore and I feel other places are flabby....like his stomach leaked? He doesn't seem to want to move around now and I'm getting worried.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

Was the distension caused by fluid or gas? Did your Veterinarian perform an abdominocentesis? If it was caused by gas it would make sense that the bloating went down after an enema; if the cause was due to fluid which has now disappeared, I am not sure on the reason for fluid disappearing after an enema unless pressure on the upper urinary tract prevented the normal flow of fluid to the bladder. I would return back to your Veterinarian tomorrow to reexamine Cree to make sure everything is in order and possibly take some blood tests. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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kitt
domestic short hair
10 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

fatigue not eating

Medication Used

IV Fluids

cat has fluid in tumm was drained 2nd time yesterday has traces of cancerous cells

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1200 Recommendations

There are numerous causes for fluid accumulation in the abdomen, including low protein levels in the blood, right sided congestive heart failure, tumours, leakage from the urinary tract as well as hormonal conditions and infections. The treatment is cause dependent and unless the cause is found, your Veterinarian will be only treating the symptoms and not the primary condition. Blood tests and x-rays would be useful in helping to determine a cause, the presence of cancerous cells in concerning and an x-ray or ultrasound followed by exploratory surgery is probably the next course of action. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

After more than one year of sporadic vomiting of bile and recent discomfort my cat had an ultrasound followed by an xray. the stomach could not be viewed b/c of fluid in stomach. He had bloods drawn and urinalysis done 4 months ago, but after all this still no dx.

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Stan
Tabby
14 Years
Critical
Has Symptoms
Weight Loss
Poor Appetite
Diarrhea
Weakness
Please help! Stan has always had mild diarrhea, but small amounts some what like a paste, around two months ago it became very watery and he was turning his nose up at his regular food (bland diet food to keep his stomach calm) He also began making a crunching sound whilst having to chew down on food. *xrays show its down to his old age* He had general blood work done all was fine except for low protein levels, possibly due to the diarrhea and eating abit less, His regular weight is 3.4kg he is now around 2.5/2.8kg, he is very skinny. Thyroid, Kidney tests showed nothing wrong, same for a stool sample that was tested. Has been on cortisone tablets to keep up appetite and regulate his insides, we had x-rays and ultrasound done, the x-rays show fluid in his abdomen, a sample was taken and we were told its linked to cancerous lymphoma, The build up of fluid isn't huge and isn't causing him trouble moving, breathing is normal and he is eating well currently, he only seems uncomfortable sometimes before he uses his tray, My questions are should we request to have the fluid removed to at least relive that feeling for awhile? We wasn't told there was any detected growth or tumour, would there be a growth to find for sure and remove? Also no word on any internal bleeding, What diuretic drugs are there we can ask the vet about to help remove/reduce/manage the fluid inside? **are there any drugs or treatments to help with his diarrhea? It seems like he can't gain any weight back or stay hydrated when the diarrhea is so constant, he has a powder in his food that acts as a pro-biotic to help but it hasn't made a difference Desperate to find solutions to at least halt this and make him build himself back up, seemingly wasting away due to bad diarrhea please any help is greatly appreciated
Halo
Cat
11 Years
Serious
Has Symptoms
Fluid In Abdomen
My cat, Halo has a very large abdomen. It is tight and extremely uncomfortable. She moves as little as possible but still eats and drinks as well as has bowel and urine. I took her to the vet where they took an x-ray and ruled out gas and tumors. He said it was fluid but when he tried to get a sample, he was unable to with multiple tries which led him to believe it was in the tissue not free flowing fluid. He then took a blood sample and the results were that she had a very high white blood cell count which indicated infection, but he said that something wasn't conducive and indicating kidney problems. His best thought was cancer. I feel helpless, like I'm just watching her function but very uncomfortably. Can I not do anything? Could it might not be cancer and possibly have something to do with her having a terrible ear infection that took 2-3 months of bouts of antibiotics to finally get rid of it? Ugh. Help me help her!
Bigfoot
Long Haired Gray
14 Years
Moderate
Has Symptoms
Fluid In Abdomen
My cat Bigfoot is 14, beautiful cat, as a senior he's lost weight but sudden weight loss, took him in for check up as had gook in eye, vet said fluid in abdomen, needle drained it, said could be heart, sent home with prednisone and diuretics, did blood work, went for recheck still had fluid, said 2 enzymes in workup were liver, did shots, needle drained, said needed hospital to drain more, I took him home, rest of bloodwork came back hyperthyroid, am treating for that now vet said NOT heart heart sounds good, needs to come in. Well he had reaction to the 2nd drain got real sick vomiting, week, but come thru with flying colors. Now vet won't do the hospital drain one says have to go to 911 clinic with 24/7 drs on staff, they charge $3,000 versus the $139.00 he does! I can't afford that and he just says take meds and pray thyroid works for liver! I'm so upset and hurt, and angry I can't give him a chance by getting all the fluid out. Any thoughts? Cat is eating, taking meds but it's only been 3 days for thyroid minus 1 dose when he vomited after procedure.
Jasmine
Russian Blue
13 Years
Serious
Has Symptoms
Coughing
Depression
Lethargic, Lessened Appetite, Some Difficulty With
Ascites
Jasmine's abdomen began to mildly retain fluid a few weeks ago. After a week-long business trip, we arrived home to see her abdomen was quite large. Blood work with snap tests were done, showing elevated leukocyte levels but nothing else . An x-ray showed the abdomen was completely filled with fluid, so we did an abdominocentesis and draining of the fluid in hopes of diagnosis. Unfortunately the tests came back with no diagnosing information--no cancer, infection, etc. At this point, she has become very distant and even more lethargic and is barely eating. The doctor I've been seeing proves unhelpful at this point. I would really appreciate a consult on what steps you would take next! We're trying everything we can but she seems to be quietly passing.
Hiro
Shorthaired Domestic
6 Months
Serious
Has Symptoms
Fluid In Abdomen
Lethargy
Frequent Urination
Constipation
My kitty has swollen abdomen. Upon checking with the vet, she said there's fluid in it and we're prescribed of antibiotics and diuretic for a week. The first few days we're seeing improvements. On the 4th day however, it stopped and we're unable to return to the vet for a week due to conflict of schedule. Once the meds have stopped, her abdomen grows again returning to it's previous size. Once we went back to the clinic, she was prescribed of a different brand of antibiotic w/ higher dosage, diuretic and iron plus bcomplex vitamins. On her 2nd day with these new meds, we noticed she hasn't pooped up until now 4th day. The other day I caught her eating her litter. Last night she suddenly became lethargic and somehow it appeared as if she is dizzy, has difficulty in sticking her head to her food or water bowl. I was able to give her a few bits of kibbles by holding it with my hand. We're going back to the vet today. It's 5am where I'm at and I just can't sleep because of worry. Should I request for an ultrasound? A heart exam or something? I'm afraid this is a very serious condition and would lose my baby like her brother when they were 3 weeks old.
COOMER
Cat
Serious
Has Symptoms
Constipation
My 18 yo cat has been getting thinner. In March this year he was showing signs of decreased appetite and vomiting ,voiding and drinking alot. Blood tests at time showed increased creatinine. ...not extremely elevated though. Did not get full panel done d/t lack of funds and his age. He was given sq fluids and seemed OK until last few days...not eating at all. Not drinking water and straining to have BM (which he would vomit after) and belly distended. More so on left side. He was given an enema last night in ER and given only 50 cc's fluid SQ. They didn't want to give more than that cause they heard a heart murmur. News to me! He did not show symptoms like my one cat from years ago did. Today...took him back to our vet...X ray...to my disappointment showed fluid in abd.....and fecal. We really thought "Coomer" was done back in March because he seemed worse than...until now. I didn't want to put him through another enema today. They just gave him SQ fluids. We brought him back home .Unfortunately tomorrow we have decided to lay him down. It still bothers me not knowing original cause of all this ....thats just me, but Cannot see spending hundreds of $'s just to find out cause which ultimately won't fix it. He was so alert and happy too until yesterday. He also had 3 tiny bumps in a row on his belly which I noticed 2 weeks ago. But ER dr. Didn't seem too concerned about it. Now I'm thinking we should have at least drained his belly to give him comfort. Thank you in advance for any feedback