Jump to section

What is Fluid In The Abdomen?

Fluid in the abdomen is also known as abdominal effusion or “ascites”. This is not a disease, but a reaction to an underlying condition. All cats have a certain amount of fluid in the abdomen, to protect the internal organs. When this fluid builds up to dangerous levels, it is known as ascites.

Cats can have a variety of medical conditions that may require treatment. While most cats do not encounter serious health problems, some develop conditions that will require medical intervention. If you cat has fluid in his abdomen, he may exhibit specific symptoms that must be investigated by a veterinarian to ensure your cat’s recovery. 

Fluid In The Abdomen Average Cost

From 362 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,000

Average Cost

$850

Symptoms of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

Ascites causes your cat to be uncomfortable and he may display certain symptoms that relay that message. Here are some of the most common symptoms associated with fluid in the abdomen in domestic cats:

  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Overall weakness
  • Groaning noises while in a lying position
  • Abdominal distention 
  • Discomfort when the abdominal area is pressed
  • Male cats may have swollen scrotum
  • Difficulty breathing
arrow-up-icon

Top

Causes of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

There are a variety of medical conditions or diseases that can cause your cat to develop fluid in his abdomen. Below are some of the most common causes of abdominal effusion in cats:

  • Bleeding in the abdomen
  • Cancer
  • Diseases of the liver such as hepatitis or cirrhosis
  • Excessive loss of albumin due to kidney failure
  • Diseases of the heart, especially right sided heart failure
  • Infectious diseases such as feline infectious peritonitis
  • Nephritic syndrome
arrow-up-icon

Top

Diagnosis of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

In order to diagnose your cat, your veterinarian will need to obtain important information from you. He will need to know any information regarding your cat’s birth, pre-existing health conditions and the symptoms he has been exhibiting. Your doctor will also need to know when you first noticed symptoms, so he can determine how long the condition has been present. Vital signs will be taken at your doctor visit. Your doctor will check your cat’s weight, temperature, heart rate and rate of respiration. He will then examine your cat. The doctor will observe your cat’s behavior, neurological function and gait. He will palpate your cat’s abdomen, as well. 

Diagnostic tests will help your veterinarian determine the cause of abdominal effusion. He will draw a blood sample and run a complete biochemical profile and a CBC or complete blood count. A urine sample will be taken and evaluated, as well. 

arrow-up-icon

Top

Treatment of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

If your cat has a significant buildup of fluid in his abdomen, the first order of treatment is to remove it so he can be more comfortable. Your veterinarian will most likely perform a procedure known as abdominocentesis. During this procedure, your doctor will tap the abdomen with a fine needle and drain the fluid. If your cat does not have a large buildup of fluid and is otherwise stable, your doctor may treat him with diuretics to help him eliminate the fluid.

Once the fluid has been removed, your doctor will work to treat the cause of the condition. If your cat has bleeding in his abdomen, your doctor may perform surgery to stop it. This will prevent the blood from re-accumulating in the abdomen. Cancer causing tumors may require surgery, as well. Medications such as antibiotics may be necessary to treat conditions such as bacterial infections. 

arrow-up-icon

Top

Recovery of Fluid In The Abdomen in Cats

The length of time it will take your cat to recover depends on several factors. Some cats will undergo abdominocentesis and the problem will be resolved. Those cats feel better almost instantly and return to normal activity levels within a day or so. Cats that require surgery to remove tumors or to stop bleeding, will need several more weeks to recover. Your doctor may keep your cat in the hospital for a few days to give him medication and monitor his condition. Once he is stable enough to go home, your doctor will provide you with detailed instruction on how to care for him. If your cat has a bacterial infection that requires IV antibiotics, your cat may need to stay in the hospital for a few days, as well. Your doctor will send any needed medications home with you after discharge along with instructions on how to give them.

Some cats may need to be placed on a special diet that restricts sodium. This is because consuming excessive amounts of salt may cause your cat to retain water and cause fluid to re-accumulate. It is important that you follow these instructions to be sure your cat recovers fully. In addition, your doctor may want to see your cat every week or so to check for signs of fluid build-up. At these visits, it is important for you to tell your doctor about any unusual symptoms or changes in your cat’s eating pattern or behavior. Your cat will have a better chance of recovery when you and your veterinarian work as a team to care for him. 

arrow-up-icon

Top

*Wag! may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. Items are sold by the retailer, not Wag!.

Fluid In The Abdomen Average Cost

From 362 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,000

Average Cost

$850

arrow-up-icon

Top

Fluid In The Abdomen Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

question-icon-cta

Ask a Vet

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

short-hair tabby cat

dog-age-icon

Three Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Concave Chest

My male cat has quite severe fluid build up around his stomach area. His stomach has very slowly been increasing with more and more fluid over the past 3/4 months and I am now getting concerned. What would your diagnonses be? Thank you.

Sept. 29, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

1 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, without being able to see your cat, I can't say what the diagnosis might be. Common causes for fluid buildup in the abdomen include heart failure, liver disease, infection, or protein losing diseases. Since this seems to be getting worse, it would probably be best to have your cat seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. They will be able to examine your cat, see what might be going on, and give you an idea as to what treatment might be available. I hope it all goes well for your cat.

Sept. 29, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Mutt

dog-age-icon

old

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Belly Fluid, Very Boney, Dry Flaking Coat, Lethargy

I have been feeding scraps to an old feral cat on my porch. He is beginning to trust me, but I can't imagine getting him into a carrier. He is skinny, with a soft distended belly. He was eating wet can food, but now he only wants chicken and some days acts really hungry but won't eat. He drinks and urinates ok. He is old, with only one eye, and I am not looking to take him to a vet; I just don't think the trauma is worth it. But I do want to know if there is any food or supplement I can give him. He doesn't seem to be in pain.

Sept. 28, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I apologize for the delay in response, there is a delay in receiving these emails sometimes. Without knowing what might be going on with him, I think the only thing that you can do is continue to feed him canned food, as that seems to be something that he can eat. He may have dental disease or gingivitis that is making it impossible to eat, in which case there isn't really anything that you can do for him, unfortunately. I hope that he continues to have some quality of life.

Oct. 6, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Black cat

dog-age-icon

Ten Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Bloated Stomach, Legs Swollen With Water

He has vomited some of his food, his stomached is bloated, and his legs are retaining fluid.

Sept. 28, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Gina U. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

0 Recommendations

Hello I'm sorry to see that your pet is not feeling well. Vomiting can be caused by dietary intolerance or indiscretion, an infection, or some type of organ dysfunction. Leg swelling could be caused by heart disease. I recommend that you take him to a veterinarian for an exam as soon as possible. They will want to run diagnostic tests like lab work and x-rays. Good luck.

Sept. 28, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Mixed

dog-age-icon

One Week

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Yellow Fluid Heavy Breathing Lumps On Stomach

It has been like this for 20 min now. Was have been feeding it water with a dropper. It is a little calmer now. Before this one we found an already dead kitten. Also has been yelping a little. Is drinking water but refused mother’s milk. Responses but by bit. Is also having rapid breathing.

Sept. 27, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I apologize for the delay in answering, this venue is not set up for urgent emails. It would be best to have your pet seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get any treatment that they might need.

Oct. 13, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

medium hair

dog-age-icon

One Year

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Bloated Round Stomach

My one year old male smokey, has been really bloated for a few days so i took him to the vet yesterday. He seemed normal, he was still doing his everyday activities, being lovable like usual, still eating/ drinking regularly. They pulled a clear pinkish liquid from his abdomen and said that he had a lot in his stomach. they ran test and everything came back negative for diseases. The vet told me it was due to his low protein levels. Told me i needed to change his diet and they sent me home with medication. How long will it take for him to get back to normal?

July 14, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Without knowing why he has low protein levels, it is hard to know when to expect him to improve. It is unusual in a 1 year old cat, and I might ask a few more questions of your veterinarian as far as what they think is going on, what is causing it, and what to expect as far as recovery. I hope that all goes well for him and that he is back to normal soon.

July 14, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

KiKi

dog-breed-icon

tabby

dog-age-icon

13 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

My sweet Kiki has had a bloated belly for a few weeks now. She has been eating and drinking normally and showing no signs of pain. I was still concerned so I called my Veterinarian. At her direction, she urged my to take her into the ER. While in the ER, she mentioned a heart murmur, they performed an ultra sound, found fluid around the belly and took a sample of it. The doctor came back and said that it wasn't bloody, however it was quite yellow in color. They asked if I wanted to leave her overnight for more testing. I declined and they sent us home with pain medication and an estimate for further testing which came to $2,000. In tears, I returned home to tell my husband it may be time to put her down since its so expensive and she's an old girl. It's been two days now and she is back to acting like her normal self. Yelling at me at 5:30 in the morning for breakfast. The ER doctor mentioned the testing for liver disease, cancer, Corona and FIP. Does anyone know of a way to do this or treat whatever it may be without spending thousands of dollars? I love my sweet girl and I'm not ready to say good-bye yet. Any advice would be appreciated.

dog-name-icon

Baby

dog-breed-icon

Short hair tabby

dog-age-icon

11 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

She Still Eats And Sleeps The Same

My 11 year old female Tabby, Baby, had a large sac hanging from her belly recently. One day she was laying in my bed and when she got up and walked away there was a puddle. I noticed a water substance leaking from the bottom of her belly. She wouldn’t let me touch her so I just laid out a towel in her favorite hiding spot where she laid and I monitored her. The next day no sack and she seemed fine. It’s now 2 weeks later and I can see the beginning of another build up of liquid in the same place. The vet said it was ‘normal’ which I find hard to believe. Baby is still her feisty self but I don’t think a repeat is healthy for her. What is this and what do I do. She eats, drinks and sleeps the same but I’m still worried. What can we do.

dog-name-icon

Meowmi

dog-breed-icon

Domestic cat

dog-age-icon

6 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Swollen Abdomen
Swollen Joints

My cat has a swollen tummy for about a month now. She doesnt like to eat solid foods so i gave her cat.foods for a year old. She now has swollen legs too. She's too thin now and has difficulty breathing. Her tummy is too big and she doesnt want it to be touched. She is now 6 years old. What can i do?

dog-name-icon

Gus

dog-breed-icon

Bengal

dog-age-icon

12 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

thumbs-up-icon

2 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Anemia
Lethargy
Ascites
Loss Of Appetite
Listless
Hypoxia

As hard as it is for me to write this, I feel that by sharing my experience, and my mistakes, I may help someone out there facing similar illness in their beloved cat-friend-child. My ~12years old Bengal friend, Gus, has always been a high energy and very affectionate cat - like a little boy. (We got him from a cats foster-home in 2012) He had a little bloody diarrhea episode on 26th Dec 2018, which made us take him to a VCA specialty clinic for a checkup (doctors at this clinic referred to as 'A' in below) They did a complete blood-work/ultrasound which was unremarkable for most part. His ultrasound showed some thickening in intestinal walls, and a possibility of a hypoehoic mass (darkened region on ultrasound) between his pancreas and spleen. They didn't find it to be too concerning at that point, and sent him home with some antibiotics. The meds helped and he was back to his normal solid-poop self. However starting 2nd week of Feb, we started noticing a little bulge in his abdomen, which I ignorantly attributed to him possibly eating more and gaining weight. (Mistake #1: Knowing how athletic a cat he was, I should have not imagined him gaining belly-fat, and taken him in for a check-up right away). Over next week, I changed his diet a little (he was always fed canned wet food, Wellness for most part) to use high-protein/less-fat, but his abdomen kept getting bigger over next week. I finally took him to a vet (this doctor referred to as 'B' in below) for a checkup on 21st Feb. Gus had gained about 3 pounds since Dec, and Dr. 'B' confirmed that he had fluid in his abdomen. Dr B drained about 3/4 pounds of fluid out and sent it for cytology, as well as, did a complete blood work (CBC, and renal profile). The blood work was good, except for the WBC being slightly higher than upper range). Dr. 'B' suspected FIV, but since the drained fluid was more pink in color and not milky, he wasn't sure. The cytology report two days later confirmed that it was not FIV. There was no clear diagnosis in the cytology report except for a possibility of some kind of neoplasia (cancerous growth) due to uneven RBC sizes observed in cytology test. At this point, looking at Gus' previous ultrasound report from Dec, Dr. B suspected that the hypoechoic mass noticed behind his pancreas back then could have been some kind of cyst, and if that was the case, he'd recommend taking it out surgically. We took Gus back to clinic 'A' on Mon 25th Feb for another echo/ultrasound. The echo was excellent, no issues in the heart. The ultrasound turned out to be better than before - no signs of hypoechoic mass behind his pancreas, but there was still some thickening noticed in his intestinal walls, and the radiologist at 'A' also noticed some nodules like formations in there. Based on these findings, the vet at 'A' suspected a possibility of some kind of neoplasia/lymphoma, and recommended doing a needle-biopsy on live for further evaluation, followed by starting Gus on Predinsole steroid tablets. They also recommended not to drain all of fluid in Gus' abdomen out, as that might have put pressure on his heart. I consulted with Dr. 'B' about this, and Dr. 'B' stressed that doing an exploratory biopsy surgery on Gus would be a better option than the needle biopsy as that may not get the affected tissue sample. I was so paralyzed in my mind that evening that I agreed to Dr. B's recommendation of invasive biopsy surgery (Mistake# 2 !), without making him discuss the pros/cons of the invasive surgery, vs. starting with steroid/anti-biotics treatment, and impact on Gus's remaining quality of life. Dr. B claimed that the biopsy surgery was not a big deal, and was as simple surgical procedure as neutering a cat. In hindsight, if I had known that the surgery could make it harder for Gus's immune system to fight on two fronts (the possible lymphoma, and healing surgical wounds), and that the prognosis would be no better than simply starting him on steroid treatment advised by 'A', I would have said no to the invasive procedure. But I just wasn't thinking clearly at that fated Monday evening. The Dr. 'B' arranged the surgery on Tue the 26th Feb, and asked me to not feed Gus after midnight. I dropped Gus off at ‘B’ around noon. However, the surgery didn’t start until around 4pm that evening. Originally Dr. B was planning to keep him overnight at his clinic for observation of his recovery, but then he changed his mind around 7pm and asked us to take Gus home as he wasn’t willing to eat. I picked Gus up around 7:30pm and took him home with only instructions to give him Entyce syringes if needed. Dr. ‘B’ seemed to have just assume that Gus would start eating at home, and didn’t give us any guidelines on force-feeding him. Gus was extremely weak and wobbly that night, and just laid on his side with eyes open all night. It seemed that he was in pain, and still not willing to eat. I did not try to force-feed him worrying that he might vomit, imagining that his symptoms must be effects of the anesthesia. (* Mistake# 3!). Gus did drink lots of water next morning, but still no willingness to eat. I took him back to ‘B’ for a follow-up checkup, and ‘B’ simply sent him home with another buprenorphine, and cerenia injection. Gus had not eaten for more than 36hrs at this point, but ‘B’ did not have any concerns. We trusted ‘B’ and did not still try to force-feed Gus all day. Gus did lick about 0.5oz of wet food from my fingers, but that was it all Wed the 27th. Gus remained very weak and laid on his side with eyes open for most part all day/night again. Worried that he had eaten so very little in almost 50hours, I took him to ‘B’ again on Thu 28th morning. Dr. ‘B’ still did not say anything about force-feeding him, did not bother to do any follow-up blood work on Gus, and sent us home again with another higher dose buprenorphine injection, claiming it’d help him sleep. He also gave us a buprenorphine syringe to give to Gus after 12 hours. Gus condition did not improve much all day. We got him to lick more food off our fingers, but still not much – maybe another 4 oz or so all day. Gus kept drinking lots of water throughout the day. I gave buprenorphine syringe to Gus around midnight, and it seemed that oral dose helped him a bit, and he did sleep that night. Gus seemed just a little better on Friday morning. I decided to force-feed him with a syringe, and he did not seem to mind too much. He was walking around a little, and went to lay by our another cat (a 14yrs old tabby), and got a tongue-bath from her as well. We started feeling better that he was recovering a bit, and that his weakness/no-appetite was probably just surgery after-effects. But that evening Gus had a urinary incontinence episode on the bed. We consulted with. Dr. B that evening, but Dr. B ignored the urinary incontinence episode. He focused on the fact that the biopsy report had indicated strong possibility of spreading Carcinoma in Gus’ intestines. Dr. B said that he had already consulted with his oncologist vet friend, and recommended starting chemo, Carboplatin infusion directly into Gus’ abdomen, starting Monday. I said yes – again without forcing Dr. B to give me pros/cons of the treatment, or asking to consult with the oncologist ourselves for any alternate options. (Mistake# 4!). Dr. B also suggested to start Gus on ¼ of ‘Mirtazapine’ tablet to help with his appetite next morning. So, on Sat morning, I force-fed about 2.5oz of Hill’s prescription diet A/D food to Gus, and mixed 1/4th Mirtazapine tablet in that food. A few minutes after eating, Gus started having some light tremors in his body, and his head was shaking visibly. In panic, I had the after-hours/weekend service page Dr. B. Dr. B called me back an hour later, and suggested to wait-and-watch, unless the tremors got worse. At this point Dr. B wasn’t still too concerned about our observations that Gus’ weakness had increased, and he was visibly having hard time walking to the water and/or litter box to pee. Still no advice on checking Gus’ blood-work to make sure that the biopsy surgery hadn’t deteriorated his condition, and no concerns about our mention of Gus’ progressing weakness. The after-effects of Mirtazapine sub-sided after a couple of hours, but it still hadn’t helped Gus with the appetite. I continued to force-feed Gus on Sat/Sunday (about 4oz of a/d food each day). What I was unware of at that point was that we should have been feeding a lot more quantity of a/d food to Gus. The online published guidelines (I found later) are about 2000 calories a day for ~12 lb cat, which would have been almost two cans of a/d food every day. On Sunday, Gus’s weakness had worsened, but trusting Dr. B’s feedback so far, I, once again did not rush Gus to emergency clinic for a check-up (Big Mistake# 5!). On Monday, the 4th March morning, Gus had lost weight, muscle mass, and was wobbling in getting to the litter-box. I was very worried at this point, but was hoping that Dr. B would check on him before the chemo appointment that afternoon. I took Gus in around noon to Dr. B. I was informed by his staff that he was running behind due to some urgent calls that morning, and he might not have time for a consultation before the chemo procedure on Gus. Once again, trusting Dr. B judgement, I agreed to whatever Dr. B suggested, and they took Gus in. As I was worried about Gus not eating, and had just found out about esophagus feeding tube from online browsing, I asked Dr. B’s staff to ask Dr. B about possibility of feeding tube for Gus. Three hours later. Dr. B asked me to his consultation room, and said that the carboplatin chemo/fluid-drainage/feeding-tube was all done, and Gus was recovering from anesthesia. He then mentioned that the fluid-drainage indicated lot more blood in the fluid than a week before, and that Gus’ CBC blood-work (that was done by him during past three hours) indicated severe regenerative anemia, with Hemocrit being only about 11%. The CBC Idexx report indicated lots of new immature RBCs being generated, and strong possibility of Hemolytic anemia, possibly due to his intestinal carcinoma spreading all this while in last week. He said that at this point Gus needed immediate blood transfusion to get to the point where any other treatment could be undertaken. While Dr. B was discussing all of this, he was also wrapping a bandage around Gus’ neck, and then he taped the hanging feed-tube folded-upward on that bandage. I went out for a few minutes to call work for time-off, and inquire clinic ‘A’ about blood-transfusions (was quoted $3300 with no guarantee of Gus surviving the transfusion process). I made up my mind to take the chance anyway, and went back in. At this point Gus had started vocalizing and becoming agitated, trying to jump off the kennel. His jaws were chattering and he was exhibiting chocking like symptoms. Dr. B was just standing there discussing how it might be too late for blood-transfusion, ignoring Gus’ loud vocalizing. In panic, I asked Dr. B technician if anything could be done to alleviate Gus choking condition, and he finally put an oxygen mask to Gus’ mouth, which seemed to calm him a bit. But his body was still convulsing. Dr. B started to check on his pulse, and said that his pulse was sinking. I told him that Gus seemed okay before the neck bandage was put on, and asked him to loosen it, He did that, but it didn’t help Gus. In my panicked state, I forgot to ask Dr. B to also loosen the feeding-tube that was taped upward tightly to that bandage… To this time, I have a lingering feeling that the feeding-tube’s getting taped up was what was Choking Gus, because my later browsing the Internet indicated that the death due to not enough red blood-cells carrying oxygen (hypoxia) is supposed to be relatively painless – like fading away in sleep!! I’d never know for sure! Seeing how Gus’ body was convulsing on the table, his hind legs frantically kicking, I desperately wanted to ease it, and asked Dr. B (who was just standing by, not suggesting anything – I guess, vets, having seen many deaths, get hardened enough to not be bothered by vocalizing/pain/suffering in pets on death-bed) about if we could give him any anesthesia. Dr. B then shaved Gus’s neck and gave him euthanasia injection, all this while Gus’s body suffering, fighting, struggling! I watched him pass way over next minute – that seemed like an eternity to my in-shock mind! I had never wanted Gus’s last time to be so full of suffering – When there was time for Gus to go, I wanted the vet to come to our home for euthanasia, and I had hoped, based on Dr. B’s feedback the last week after biopsy, that we should have at least two weeks, and more likely two months with Gus, after chemo treatment started. I was so in denial about Gus’s condition all last week – and seems like that every decision I took was the wrong one for Gus. Should have listened to the vet at ‘A’ and started Gus on steroids, rather than accepting Dr. B’s recommendation of biopsy surgery, that Gus never recovered from. I still don’t understand how Dr. B could have gone ahead with Chemo/fluid-drainage that fateful Monday morning, when he say how weak/fragile condition Gus was in. Why didn’t he wait for the CBC results before putting Gus under anaesthesia for chemo? Was it purely for the thousands of dollars that those procedures generated that day, or was it because he was rushed that morning, or maybe he truly believed it to be the best course of treatment at that point. I’d never know – I should give benefit of doubt to Dr. B. After all, me being responsible for Gus, I am the one who should have been more through about evaluating pros/cons of invasive procedures on Gus’ quality of life. I should have gotten a second opinion before agreeing to biopsy. I should have rushed Gus to emergency clinic after noticing his weakening condition last weekend. If I had done that, possibly the blood-transfusion would have saved him for now. In the end, it was the sequence of my decisions that not only ended up shortening remaining time Gus had, but also made it a horrific painful last moments for that little magnificent friend. Sorry about the lengthy paragraphs. I sincerely hope that no one out there has to go through something like this – and that this would help someone in evaluating the invasive options more thoroughly.

dog-name-icon

Fat cat

dog-breed-icon

Black shorthair cat

dog-age-icon

18 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

thumbs-up-icon

0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Fluid In Abdomen
Lethargy
Poor Appetite

Elderly cat 18 years.fluid in abdomen.lethargic.picks at food.drinking a lot mostly cat milk.tender tummy.constipated. urinating frequently.lack of interest in toys and people.

Fluid In The Abdomen Average Cost

From 362 quotes ranging from $200 - $2,000

Average Cost

$850

How can we help your pet?