Hyphema Average Cost

From 303 quotes ranging from $300 - 2,500

Average Cost

$750

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What is Hyphema?

These sudden types of hyphema may be caused by many things such as glaucoma, retinal tears, or uveitis. There are several different ways this disorder may present itself such as tiny blood clots in the eye, a redness of the entire eye, or several layers of recurrent hyphema which shows as purple and bright red areas. Hyphema may be just an annoyance or a severe debilitating condition, depending on the cause and severity. Some of the secondary complications are adhesions, permanent blurred vision, and blindness.

Even if your dog’s eye is only a little bit red and does not seem to be painful or affecting vision, it could be a sign of an underlying disorder. For example, your pet may have high blood pressure or a clotting disease such as Von Willebrand’s Disease, hemophilia, or thrombocytopenia. If your dog has blood or discoloration in the eye, you should see a veterinary professional as soon as possible to prevent serious complications.

Hyphema is a hemorrhage in the eye between the cornea and the iris that causes the area to fill with blood. This condition usually occurs because of an injury but may happen spontaneously.

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Symptoms of Hyphema in Dogs

The symptoms of hyphema are varied, depending on the cause. However, some of the most common are:

  • Redness in the eye
  • Cloudiness of the eye
  • Pool of blood in the iris or cornea
  • Squinting
  • Eye pain
  • Keeping eye closed
  • Vision loss (bumping into objects)

Types

  • Traumatic hyphema is a condition caused by an injury to the head or eye
  • Secondary hyphema may be caused by many different diseases and disorders

Causes of Hyphema in Dogs

  • Trauma
  • Uveitis (inflammation of the eye)
  • Intraocular neoplasia (tumor)
  • Retinal detachments or tears
  • Systemic hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Coagulation factor abnormalities
  • Platelet disorders such as leukemia, anemia, lymphoma, and blood loss.
  • Hyperviscosity
  • Congenital ocular anomalies
  • Anterior segment neovascularization
  • Glaucoma

Diagnosis of Hyphema in Dogs

It is important to have your pet checked out by your veterinarian as soon as possible if you suspect hyphema because it could be a sign of a secondary condition that may be  serious. In fact, it may be an early symptom of an illness that could be life threatening, so it is best to get it checked out. The veterinarian will need to discuss your dog’s medical history and recent vaccination records. Be sure to let the veterinarian know if you have given your pet any medication or supplements of late because some products can mimic or mask symptoms and affect the treatment plan.

A comprehensive physical examination will be done including reflexes, pupil reaction time, mucous membrane color, blood pressure, respirations, and breath sounds. In addition, the veterinarian will do a detailed optical assessment and run some diagnostic tests. Some of these tests include a fluorescein stain test, tonometry, ocular ultrasound, Schirmer tear testing, cytology, x-rays, and slit lamp examination. Laboratory tests needed include a urinalysis, fungal and bacterial cultures, and additional blood marker evaluation to investigate secondary causes.

Treatment of Hyphema in Dogs

The treatment depends on what is causing the hyphema and how severe it is. For example, if your dog had an eye injury and there are no other complications, there may be no need to treat the eye because it will go away on its own. For other causes of hyphema, the underlying problem has to be treated.

Ulceration

Treatment usually includes antibiotic drops, topical atropine, and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). If there is an underlying cause of the ulceration, this will need to be treated as well.

Glaucoma

To treat glaucoma, prostaglandin, mannitol, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor may be prescribed. Surgical options include laser cyclophotocoagulation, anterior shunts, evisceration, or enucleation.

Uveitis

Topical atropine, prednisone drops, NSAIDs, or systemic steroid cream may be used.

Intraocular Neoplasia (tumor)

In this case, the tumor will need to be removed, which sometimes includes evisceration of the eye as well. Other treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation, may be used in some situations.

Systemic Hypertension

If your dog is found to have high blood pressure, beta blockers or ACE inhibitors may be prescribed. The veterinarian will also want to look into the cause of the hypertension.

Other Causes

Other causes of hyphema will require further examination and possibly a visit to a specialist. Your veterinarian will refer you to who you need to see.

Recovery of Hyphema in Dogs

After treatment, you may need to keep your pet in a crate or a small room to prevent accidents. Exercise will be limited; each case will be individually assessed as to return to normal activity. In some instances, eye drops or medicated ointment will be required on a daily basis during the recovery period or longer. Return for follow up must always be adhered to, per the veterinary team’s recommendations.

Hyphema Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Puppy
Labrador Retriever
7 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Redness

A day ago my 7 week old lab puppy fell from a very tall place onto the floor. He didn't have any obvious injuries, he was only very scared and agitated. He's back to his normal self, eating and chasing balls. He doesn't whine about anything and nothing seems to be hurting him. I noticed the white of his eyes are a subtle shade of red in the white of his eyes though, he seems to see just fine I'm only concerned that the trauma may have caused something serious. He doesn't scratch at his eyes, he does shake his head a lot, vigorously. Please help. Many thanks.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2478 Recommendations
Any traumatic injury should be seen by your Veterinarian as brain injury may be delayed with symptoms presenting after days or weeks; without examining him I cannot say whether or not he is alright, the eyes may be just a sign of something more serious. You should keep a close eye on him but visit your Veterinarian for a full examination to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Snoopy
Poodle
5 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Bright red blood shot eyes

I took my dog (a 5 month old Royal Poodle) to the groomers and 5 minutes later she calls saying I need to pick him up. When I arrive she recommends I leave him with her for 3 days for training, when I return in three days my puppy had bright red blood shot eyes. Both eyes, no discharge, no crying, scratching or itching.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2478 Recommendations
There are various causes for bloodshot eye in dogs which may include infections, allergies, irritation from chemical cleaning products, trauma, foreign objects among many other causes. You should flush the eyes out with sterile saline and apply an ophthalmic antibiotic ointment to the eyes to be on the safe side; if there is no improvement over the next day or so you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kimmie
Shih Tzu
10 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Blue fog, cant open her eye,

About 2 weeks ago i noticed my dogs eye had a blue fog to it. I took her to the vet that same night. They prescribed antibiotics and eye ointment. A week later she was doing much better and i took her to her primary vet and they suggested i lower the amount of times i give her the medication. Now its back! She cant open her eye and the blue fog is back! What is wrong with her? What can i do? I cant afford to take her to the vet every week and im worried about my dog!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2478 Recommendations
There are a few different causes for a blue haze in the eyes, some are serious and other are not; these causes include nuclear sclerosis, corneal dystrophy, cataracts, uveitis, glaucoma among others. You should continue with the drops as directed, but call your Veterinarian to say that the blue haze has returned so that they can recommend a different dosage or course of treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bogey
Boston Terrier
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Hyphema

My 1 yr old Boston Terrier was staying at the 'Bed & Breakfast' at his vet. When we dropped him off, the vet techs came out and put him on a slip lead, which he didn't like. My husband and I didn't feel right about leaving him there so we picked him up after spending 2 nights there. When we picked him up, his eyes show what I now know is called hyphema. I'm worried because the ER vet said my dog wouldn't allow them to check his eye pressure. I'm so worried about his eyesight. Shouldn't they have sedated him? What if he has torn retinas. Then they tell me the hyphema could have resulted from strangulation with the slip lead. In reality, we don't know how severe it is because they didn't test him.But, it appears really bad.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2478 Recommendations
Hyphema may be something simple or something complex and without a thorough examination of the eye including with an ophthalmoscope and tonopen it is difficult to determine the severity of any injury; choke chains are not something I agree with as they can cause severe injury especially if used badly. Sedation is not always an ideal solution since we like patients to be as ‘normal’ as possible during an examination so that we don’t pass over a symptom. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bean
Chihuahua
4 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Bloody eye

We noticed our Chihuahua Bean has blood pooling under his eyelid. He's four years old. In perfect health other than the eye. No preexisting conditions. Yesterday he tried jumping on the couch but missed and hit is face off the glass coffee table. The glass didn't break.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2478 Recommendations
It is possible that the presence of blood is just due to a ruptured capillary, you should monitor the eye for any changes and for the blood to disappear. But any trauma to the head should be checked by your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Shelby
Chihuahua
7 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Red Eye

My 7 year old chihuahua has had poor vision since I rescued her when she was a puppy. Her right eye has cataracts for the last couple of years. Recently (past 2 weeks) her left eye has taken on a red color and it sounds like Hyphema from everything I have read online. Other than the limited vision issue, she seems totally fine. Eating, playing, snuggling, going on walks, etc. Shows zero signs of pain. If she appeared to be in any pain, we would have already taken her to the vet. Any thoughts? Thank you so much.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1054 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. If Shelby has blood in the chamber of her eye, she will need medical treatment, as she is at risk of glaucoma without resolution of that condition. it would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian. I hope that all goes well for her.

Thank you for your help. I will have her eye looked at and hope for the best. I appreciate your quick response.

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Xena
Razorback Pitbull
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

No Pain
Normal discharge
Loss of vision
Dark redness in pupil and iris
no swelling

Our 2 1/2 year old Pitbull woke up several days ago with her iris and pupil blood red. She got in to a fight with a cat about 2 months where the cat scratched her eye, but she was only in pain for one day. Several weeks ago she had pink eye, but that cleared up within a few days. She does not seem to be in any pain, but has shown signs of significant vision loss in that eye. After doing my own research, I believe she has hyphema, but am not 100% sure. What is your professional opinion and what steps should we be taking to help her?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1054 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. WIthout examining Xena and looking at her eye, I cannot give my professional opinion on what might be going on with her eye. It could be an infection, trauma, or systemic disease causing that change. It would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine her eye, determine what might be going on, and recommend appropriate medications. If she does have hyphema, it needs to be treated fairly aggressively, as she is at risk of developing glaucoma. I hope that everything goes well for her.

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Kane
Bichon Frise
2 Years
Mild condition
-1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

hypema

My Bichon had a Retrobulbar Hemorrhage 4 weeks ago. He healed well with no obvious complications other than loss of vision in that eye. Now he shows signs of hypema. Since he already lost vision in that eye and appears to not be bothered by it, is this an emergency or can I just watch it?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1054 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Hyphema is a condition that does require attention - the blood in the chamber of the eye can lead to glaucoma, and needs to be treated. Regardless of vision, you want to maintain comfort. Your veterinarian can prescribe medications to help keep that eye healthy and prevent any unwanted effects.

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snowy
Labrador Retriever
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

I have a six year old lab who use to be really active and loved running and playing fetch.
About four weeks back he was hurt in his right eye while playing ball. Two days after that he started bumping into things after which, we rushed him to a nearest vet where he was diagnosed with corneal opacity and was treated for the same for next three weeks but during this time his condition continued to worsen since by now his eyes started to appear first marble like and then red, also now he didn't want to move at all and preferred to sleep al the time.

After that we changed the vet, where we were told that he's got Hyphema and was prescribed Xalacom and further asked to get his blood test, urine culture, head X-ray, CT scan and stomach and chest ultrasound done. Which we did and found out that he had tic fever, enlarged liver, 5.5 HB and platelet count at 61k. Upon further questioning by the vet we realised our pet had been on the slump side of his energy levels since many months before he got injured, though his food intake had not been yet affected. Further we were told that he had a dormant Tic virus in his blood and because of the trauma of eye injury it may have triggered haemorrhaging in his eyes.

As of now we are giving him medication for tic fever and to boost liver besides supplements to improve his HB. His platelet count has come up 260K and he is 30% back to his active self. He is due for next round of blood test and LPT in another ten days when we'll know the state of Tic fever and his liver.

But as of now the major concern for us remains his eyes since he still hasn't recovered his vision back. The CT scan report stated- 'No intracranial lesion seen. Note is made of hyperattenuating areas in the posterior chamber of both eyes(? Retinal detachment)'. The vet has asked us to continue with Xalocom eye drop and also start with Genteal eye drop for as many months as possible.

Please advise if there is any other course of treatment for his eyes to recover complete or partial vision And if not then how long before we can expect results with the on going treatment.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2478 Recommendations
Eye injuries can be unpredictable and many problems may occur secondary to a primary condition. Injuries to the eye may result in retinal detachment, lens luxation, glaucoma among other problems which would need to be assessed regularly with an examination; it is encouraging to see platelet counts increase and for Snowy to be improving, however I cannot give you any assurances that Snowy will regain his sight especially as I haven’t examined him. Long-term vision loss may becomes permanent depending on the underlying primary cause regardless of whether a CT scan is clear; I would advise you speak with an Ophthalmologist for a better evaluation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you, will refer to an ophthalmologist.

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Junior
Cockapoo
5 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Redness,
Hyphema

my dog went to the groomers and he came back with "Hyphema" the groomers claim that it was because of stress; I have researched it and there is no where that it says its "stressed"induced. He is more subdue, and is defensive when we go touch him.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2478 Recommendations

Hyphema is hemorrhaging of blood behind the cornea and may be attributable to many causes including trauma, uveitis (inflammation of iris), glaucoma, clotting disorders, increased blood pressure among other causes. I do not want to use the word trauma because I wasn’t there, but the symptom coupled with behaviour would be indicative of that. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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