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What is Hyphema?

These sudden types of hyphema may be caused by many things such as glaucoma, retinal tears, or uveitis. There are several different ways this disorder may present itself such as tiny blood clots in the eye, a redness of the entire eye, or several layers of recurrent hyphema which shows as purple and bright red areas. Hyphema may be just an annoyance or a severe debilitating condition, depending on the cause and severity. Some of the secondary complications are adhesions, permanent blurred vision, and blindness.

Even if your dog’s eye is only a little bit red and does not seem to be painful or affecting vision, it could be a sign of an underlying disorder. For example, your pet may have high blood pressure or a clotting disease such as Von Willebrand’s Disease, hemophilia, or thrombocytopenia. If your dog has blood or discoloration in the eye, you should see a veterinary professional as soon as possible to prevent serious complications.

Hyphema is a hemorrhage in the eye between the cornea and the iris that causes the area to fill with blood. This condition usually occurs because of an injury but may happen spontaneously.

Hyphema Average Cost

From 303 quotes ranging from $300 - $2,500

Average Cost

$750

Symptoms of Hyphema in Dogs

The symptoms of hyphema are varied, depending on the cause. However, some of the most common are:

  • Redness in the eye
  • Cloudiness of the eye
  • Pool of blood in the iris or cornea
  • Squinting
  • Eye pain
  • Keeping eye closed
  • Vision loss (bumping into objects)

Types

  • Traumatic hyphema is a condition caused by an injury to the head or eye
  • Secondary hyphema may be caused by many different diseases and disorders
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Causes of Hyphema in Dogs

  • Trauma
  • Uveitis (inflammation of the eye)
  • Intraocular neoplasia (tumor)
  • Retinal detachments or tears
  • Systemic hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Coagulation factor abnormalities
  • Platelet disorders such as leukemia, anemia, lymphoma, and blood loss.
  • Hyperviscosity
  • Congenital ocular anomalies
  • Anterior segment neovascularization
  • Glaucoma
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Diagnosis of Hyphema in Dogs

It is important to have your pet checked out by your veterinarian as soon as possible if you suspect hyphema because it could be a sign of a secondary condition that may be  serious. In fact, it may be an early symptom of an illness that could be life threatening, so it is best to get it checked out. The veterinarian will need to discuss your dog’s medical history and recent vaccination records. Be sure to let the veterinarian know if you have given your pet any medication or supplements of late because some products can mimic or mask symptoms and affect the treatment plan.

A comprehensive physical examination will be done including reflexes, pupil reaction time, mucous membrane color, blood pressure, respirations, and breath sounds. In addition, the veterinarian will do a detailed optical assessment and run some diagnostic tests. Some of these tests include a fluorescein stain test, tonometry, ocular ultrasound, Schirmer tear testing, cytology, x-rays, and slit lamp examination. Laboratory tests needed include a urinalysis, fungal and bacterial cultures, and additional blood marker evaluation to investigate secondary causes.

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Treatment of Hyphema in Dogs

The treatment depends on what is causing the hyphema and how severe it is. For example, if your dog had an eye injury and there are no other complications, there may be no need to treat the eye because it will go away on its own. For other causes of hyphema, the underlying problem has to be treated.

Ulceration

Treatment usually includes antibiotic drops, topical atropine, and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). If there is an underlying cause of the ulceration, this will need to be treated as well.

Glaucoma

To treat glaucoma, prostaglandin, mannitol, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor may be prescribed. Surgical options include laser cyclophotocoagulation, anterior shunts, evisceration, or enucleation.

Uveitis

Topical atropine, prednisone drops, NSAIDs, or systemic steroid cream may be used.

Intraocular Neoplasia (tumor)

In this case, the tumor will need to be removed, which sometimes includes evisceration of the eye as well. Other treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation, may be used in some situations.

Systemic Hypertension

If your dog is found to have high blood pressure, beta blockers or ACE inhibitors may be prescribed. The veterinarian will also want to look into the cause of the hypertension.

Other Causes

Other causes of hyphema will require further examination and possibly a visit to a specialist. Your veterinarian will refer you to who you need to see.

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Recovery of Hyphema in Dogs

After treatment, you may need to keep your pet in a crate or a small room to prevent accidents. Exercise will be limited; each case will be individually assessed as to return to normal activity. In some instances, eye drops or medicated ointment will be required on a daily basis during the recovery period or longer. Return for follow up must always be adhered to, per the veterinary team’s recommendations.

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Hyphema Average Cost

From 303 quotes ranging from $300 - $2,500

Average Cost

$750

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Hyphema Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Ask a Vet

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Pekingese

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Seven Years

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Unknown severity

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Redness

A month ago my dog bumped her head and her eye went from being a cloudy blue color, to a green color, and then eventually a red/purple color. I took her to the vet they said she had a high blood pressure of 79. They prescribed two different eyedrops which we applied for 14 days and then took her back to that same vet. The second time the eye pressure came out at 55 they said to continue the eye drops 3 times a day. A week later we took her to a different vet were they told us she could have hyphema, is anything we can do at home to help her, she doesn't seem to be in pain, but she can't see.

Oct. 13, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Those eye pressures are very high, and I believe at this point it would be best to see a specialist if there is one in your area. Glaucoma is a very hard disease to manage, and hyphema can lead to further problems. There are no home treatments for this, and close attention needs to be paid to help resolve this problem. I hope that she is okay.

Oct. 14, 2020

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Pit Bull

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Three Months

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Unknown severity

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Depressed Wont Eat Cant Move

pup has a huge pool of blood behind his left leg toward his back he got bit by a dog the blood blister is about 30 of his size he is very thin now and refuses to eat is this fatal if left untreated? i found the dog and i dont have the kinds of funds for a surgery for him

Sept. 26, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I apologize for the delay, this venue is not set up for urgent emails. It would be best to have your pet seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get treatment for them.

Oct. 15, 2020

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Spanierd

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Eight Years

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Unknown severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Vision Problems

My pup was diagnosed with Lymphoma in January of this year and we were told we didn't have much time left with him. He's exceeded the timeframe we were given and up until about 3 weeks ago, his energy was great and he was his normal self. All of a sudden he lost his energy, but now has suddenly loss his vision. His eyes are not bloodshot, but when the light hits his eyes, his eyes look red. Is this a side effect to his lymphoma? He is still eating and doesn't seem to be in pain. His normal vet didn't seem worried and said we'd have to see an ophthalmologist to determine what is going on.

July 17, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, without being able to see your dog, it is very difficult for me to comment on what might be going on with his eyes. Lymphoma can affect the retina, and that may be what is going on for him. If he seems to be comfortable otherwise, this may be something that he can learn to live with, but if you want to be sure if there is anything that can be done, having him seen by a Veterinary ophthalmologist would probably be best. Without seeing him, I can't say for sure, but he may benefit from steroid eye drops, as well. That is something that you can discuss with your veterinarian. I hope that he continues to do well.

July 17, 2020

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Dachshund

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Thirteen Years

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Unknown severity

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Glaucoma

Why is her eye this red and why does it have that in the middle our vet told us she had glaucoma we’ve been treating her with drops and pain meds she is an older dog she started having trouble seeing a couple years ago but got worse then her eye done this

July 17, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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Thank you for your question. Glaucoma can be a difficult disease to treat, and if her eye is still red or painful, and it would be best to have a follow-up with your veterinarian. It is often recommended in the early stages of treatment for glaucoma to have very frequent rechecks, regardless. They will be able to check the pressures of her eyes, see what else might be going on, and get treatment for her. I hope that everything goes well for her.

July 17, 2020

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Collie

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Thirteen Years

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Unknown severity

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pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Redness

My 13 collie Suddenly got hyphema swollen lymph nodes and a knot in his throat. He has been to two vets and we are waiting on test results. In the meantime he is getting Augmentin the vet thinks it could be Lymphoma. I just had him in for a check up all clear. How can he suddenly just have cancer? Is there anything else you think i could be doing or a course of treatment till the lymph aspiration comes back. His blood work came back today unremarkable. His platelets are a little low. Should i have him tested for thyroid of Thrombocytopenia. Im not ready to lose my baby. grateful for advice

July 16, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Gina U. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Hello So sorry to hear about your pup. Cancer can be fast-growing. It can start growing slow then pick up pace and suddenly a lymph node is enlarged. It is recommended to continue the course of antibiotics while you wait for the lab results. Good luck.

July 16, 2020

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Lulu

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English Mastiff

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2 Years

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Moderate severity

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Blindness

My 2 year old English Mastiff has traumatic hyphema level IV due to being run over from a truck. Complete blindness at present time. We are on day 3. We will visit with our vet in 4 more days to check condition. She presents with no pain. She is able to open her eyes in a non lighted room. She is eating and drinking and urinating and pooping. One eye looks very swollen and one her pupil is huge!!

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Moose

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French Bulldog

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10 Months

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Moderate severity

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Redness
Pain
Cloudieness
Blood Pooling
Eye Buggers

My dog recently scratched his eye, we are not sure how but he has seen the vet and has gotten the eye drops and cream that goes in his eye along with a painkiller. But a day or so after we went to the vet the scratch started to develop what looks like hyphema, it appears to be blood in the area that he was scratched, should I be worried and notify the vet or should I just let the antibiotics run its course and see if it heals it's self?

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Snoopy

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Golden Retriever

dog-age-icon

9 Years

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Serious severity

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1 found helpful

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Hyphema
Uveitis

After a few back to back vet visits over a couple of weeks, our dog has been diagnosed with uveitis resulting in bilateral hyphema. At this time he seems to be completely blind. The hyphema covers his entire pupil and iris on LT eye and only his entire pupil in RT eye. He is currently being treated with amoxicillin twice daily, antibiotic/decadron combo eye drop twice daily, and carprofen once daily for 14 days. Will he regain his vision? The initial hyphema was first noted 10 days ago and the other eye seemed to start about 5 days ago.

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Ginger

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Mixed

dog-age-icon

4 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Low Platelets
Blindness

My four year old mixed breed female was suddenly blind within 5 minutes she went from fine to no vision ineither eye. Both eyes were dark red and appeared to be full of blood. We immediately took her to our local emergency after hours vet. They examined her eyes and could see renital response but said her eyes were very cloudy and blood filled. They ran blood work and believe she ingested rat poison as her blood platelets were under 30. They gave her a vitamin k pill and prescribed her vitamin k for the week. They did run a tick born disease and also heart worm test. Everything was fine except her platelets. Should we have done more for her eyes? They did not have an ophthalmologist or ability to do any further testing. What should I look for to see if her eyes are healing? Will her eyesight return?

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Spurrier

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cockapoo

dog-age-icon

12 Years

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Blood In Eye

12 year old cockapoo with glaucoma. Our 12 year old dog has been diagnosed with glaucoma in both eyes. When he had cateraks we spoke to vet and because he had another issue with his retina possibly detaching she said that it was a high risk that even if we got cateraks surgery he would lose sight within months due to rentinal displacement. A few days ago our dogs eye was all red. Looks like blood in his eye I assume his retina detached He is acting fine for the most part. Playing and eating. Not avoiding our young boys I am getting him into the opthamologist ASAP Assume his eye will need to be removed? The pressure doesn’t seem to be high based on the way he is acting though. What do they do for retinal displacement t when the dog has glaucoma?

Hyphema Average Cost

From 303 quotes ranging from $300 - $2,500

Average Cost

$750

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