Peach Pits Poisoning Average Cost

From 25 quotes ranging from $300 - 3,000

Average Cost

$650

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What is Peach Pits Poisoning?

Believe it or not, peach (apricots, cherries, and plums) pits can be fatal to your dog. These pits are dangerous for three reasons. For one thing, your dog can choke on them, causing strangulation and death within minutes. In addition, the pits can cause a blockage in your dog’s intestine, which can also be fatal. However, the main reason that peach pits are dangerous to your dog is that they have amygdalin in them, which is toxic, and can cause kidney failure and death within a few days. The foliage of the peach tree is poisonous as well, so if you have any peach (apricot, cherry, or plum) trees on your property, you should be sure your dog is not able to get to the downed fruit, stems, or leaves. Your dog can get acute poisoning if a large amount of peach pits or foliage is consumed at one time, or chronic poisoning if a small amount is eaten over a period of time. The latter is equally as toxic because a dog’s body is unable to process or rid the body of the amygdalin, so it just builds up until a toxic amount is reached.

Peach pits are poisonous to your dog because they (as well as apricots, cherries, and plums) have something called cyanogenic glycosides (amygdalin) inside them, which is a form of cyanide. This toxin slows down the enzymes in your dog’s body that are essential to transport oxygen in the blood. If your dog eats enough of them, amygdalin poisoning can be dangerous and even fatal. For example, if you have peach trees, and your dog eats the peaches off the ground, it will not take too much to make him sick. As a matter of fact, the stems and leaves are also toxic, and can be dangerous for your dog if he consumes them.

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Symptoms of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

The symptoms of both acute and chronic peach pit poisoning are similar, but with chronic poisoning, the symptoms are much milder and come on slower. This makes chronic poisoning much harder to diagnose. The most common symptoms of peach pit poisoning are:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Anorexia
  • Breathing problems
  • Bright red gums and mucous membranes
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Coma
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions (seizures)
  • Coughing
  • Death
  • Dehydration
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Drooling
  • Fever
  • Gastrointestinal irritation
  • Hyperventilation
  • Lethargy
  • Panting
  • Shivering
  • Shock
  • Skin irritation
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness

 Types

  • Acute peach pit (amygdalin) poisoning occurs when your dog ingests a toxic amount of peach pits (or foliage) at one time
  • Chronic peach pit (amygdalin) poisoning occurs over time if your dog is eating a small amount of peach pits (or foliage) over a period of time

Causes of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

The cause of peach pit poisoning in dogs is the accidental or intentional ingestion of peach pits, which have toxins in them. The amygdalin (cyanogenic glycosides and amygdalin) slows down the body’s ability to deliver oxygen through the blood to the tissues and organs. This slowly suffocates the body, causing loss of consciousness, coma, cardiac arrest, and death among others.

  • Peach pits
  • Peach tree leaves
  • Peach tree foliage

Diagnosis of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

Your veterinarian will be able to diagnose your dog through your description of his symptoms and what you believe he ate. Additionally, the veterinarian will need to know about your dog’s medical history, any previous illnesses and injuries, and changes in behavior or appetite. The veterinarian will do a complete physical examination, which includes heart rate, respiration, blood pressure, body temperature, height, weight, and reflexes.

It is also necessary to complete some tests on your dog, such as a complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry profile, blood gas, and urinalysis. The veterinarian will also perform liver and kidney function tests, as well as some radiographs (x-rays) to determine the amount of damage that has been done. Kidney and liver biopsies may also be needed.

Treatment of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

Even if you get your dog to the veterinarian right away after the symptoms have started, treatment may not be successful. By the time the symptoms are evident, the damage done by amygdalin is not reversible, and can be fatal. However, the veterinarian will admit your dog to the hospital and provide oxygen and IV therapy. There are several medications that are effective for peach pit poisoning, which are hydroxylamine hydrochloride, dimethylaminophenol, and amyl nitrite.

Recovery of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

The chances of recovery are poor, since the medication to treat peach pit poisoning is toxic as well. If your dog recovers, lifespan is shortened depending on the amount of kidney and liver damage that is already done.

Peach Pits Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Harry
German Shepherd Dog
6 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My 6 year old German shepherd has been eating un ripe peaches off of a backyard tree. I think that that could be making him sick. I cut the little peach open and the pit hasn’t fully grown as the fruit is quite small/green.
He is eating way too much grass and keeps trying to vomit.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
The peaches most likely will be causing Harry to be sick; fruit is not part of a dog’s diet and large quantities of fruit may cause gastrointestinal upset especially if you spray insecticides on your peaches. I would recommend getting a temporary fence to put around the peach tree or block that part of your garden off. Also, the pit (whether developed or not) contains a toxin which can be lethal in large quantities; I would recommend a visit to your Veterinarian for an examination and supportive and symptomatic care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Roxy
Labradoodle
11 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Loose stool

My 11 month old Labradoodle (50 lbs) figured out how to open the cupboard and got into the trash. She ate the peel and a pit of a peach. This was about a week ago. She threw up yesterday after lunch and has had loose/soft poop (not diarrhea) for several days, but is playful and seems fine otherwise. I just found out now that peach pits are toxic. Since it has been about a week, do you think she will be ok? This morning her poop was more normal.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

The biggest concern with peach pits is an intestinal obstruction rather than poisoning; peach pits contain cyanide but usually not enough to cause a poisoning event especially if it was swallowed whole (more risk of poisoning if chewed up). Poisoning from peach pits would occur within hours not after a week, dogs may vomit and have loose stool due to infection, dietary changes, licking something nasty on the road among other causes; if the problem persists or you notice any other symptoms visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lucky
Golden Retriever
6 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None as of yet

My dog just ate a peach pit whole without swallowing. He is looking perfectly fine and no choking but we are worried it will cause poisoning or something much worst. We don't know how bad it can get since he only ate one. What can we do

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

A peach pit, especially if swallowed whole, wouldn’t be of much concern from a poisoning point of view but the pit may cause foreign body obstruction or irritation whilst passing through the intestinal tract. When consumption is over two hours, inducing of vomiting is generally unrewarding; keep a close eye on Lucky for signs of pain and discomfort and if you see any signs of pain or straining visit your Veterinarian and the pit may require surgical removal. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hav a dog here now that eat peach leaves n plus roaches this hm is in fested with roaches n this dog is nit doing nithing eyes real watery n blood shoot n voting fever n these people yav no $ for vet any suggestions

Where do I begin? First, I need to know how he ate the peach pit whole without swallowing it. Lol

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Maya
Golden Retriever
6 Months
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Tired

My my 6 month old puppy eat a peach pit that was laying around by accident she seems to be visably fine but I am worried is this something I should worry about or do you think she will be fine this happened 2 nights ago but I’m still unsure

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

If the peach pit was chewed up and in pieces when it was consumed, Maya should be fine; if it was swallowed whole, then there may be a problem passing it (you would be surprised what may be swallowed whole by a dog). At this point, keep an eye on Maya and if you notice any discomfort, loss of appetite or diarrhoea visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Canelo
American Pit Bull Terrier
8 Weeks
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None as of yet

8 and half week old Dog chewed on a peach pit but did not consume. I am really worried.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Peach pits, like cherries, apple seeds and other contain a form of cyanide which varies in concentration but may be high enough to cause symptoms of poisoning or even death in some instances. Another problem is they may obstruct the gastrointestinal tract if swallowed. If he was just chewing, I wouldn’t be too concerned, but watch out for signs of vomiting, diarrhoea, tremors, depression or any other symptoms on this page; if you notice any symptoms visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My puppy, who is a 9 weeks old Puggle has just eaten a peach stone that was lying around by mistake. I think she chewed it and it broke into pieces and then she ingested it. What should I do?

My seven month old Boxer cross ate a peach pit one day ago - I believe whole. He seems to be fine, naturally he is a sleepy dog. He has been eating normal but his poop was a bit runny (He did recently have the runs - he eats lots of grass). What are the chances of him being able to pass the pit - should I be worried/take him to the vet?

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Sock
Mixed
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No symptoms yet

My two year old small crossbreed dog ate the flesh of the peach and I found the pit and the stem on the floor It doesn't look broken or chewed and I didn't find crumbs on the carpet.Wat should I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

In small quantities, the flesh of the peach is not normally dangerous for dogs; the pit when chewed may cause poisoning or if swallowed whole may cause an obstruction. I wouldn’t be too worried, you may notice some diarrhoea if Sock isn’t used to fruit; just keep an eye on him, however if you are concerned you could induce vomiting using 3% hydrogen peroxide. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My dog (who is a shorkie, a Shih Tzu and Yorkie) may have eaten a stone from a broken pit. He's small, what do I do

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Miesha
Rottweiler
11 Weeks
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Tired
Thirsty
Panting

My 11 week old Rottweiler puppy ate some of the flower buds on a peach tree. She has been very thirsty and had diarrhea two days after she got ahold of the buds. She is eating normal and she did have a solid poop a few hours ago but I am just still concerned

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

I do not have any toxicological data on the flower buds of peach trees; but if you are noticing an improvement it is a good sign. Given the severity of peach pit poisoning, I would recommend having Miesha having a check over by her Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Elise
Puggle
4 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None as of yet

Medication Used

none

My puppy, who is a 4 months old Puggle has just eaten a peach stone that was lying around by mistake. I think she chewed it and it broke into pieces and then she ingested it. What should I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Given the size and age of Elise, it would be best to visit your Veterinarian straight away as ingestion can lead to symptoms of poisoning, but large pieces can cause obstruction or (if there are sharp edges) rupture of the gastrointestinal tract. Inducing vomiting can cause problems with sharp edges coming back up and it has passed two hours since ingestion (from when you asked the question). Please take Elise to her Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Rex
Staffordshire Terrier
2 Years
Mild
Has Symptoms
Vomiting
My dog ate an unknown number of peaches when outside, threw up this morning and nothing came up. he just threw up a whole peach seed up and it doesn't look damaged. Should I be worried? He's 60lbs and is acting perfectly fine and happy.
Jack
Flat Coat Retriever
10 Years
Fair
Has Symptoms
Nothing Yet
My dog, Jack found a mostly eaten peach in the park and swallowed it entirely. Is there anything I should feed him that might help? What should I do?
Jack
Flat Coat Retriever
10 Years
Fair
Has Symptoms
Nothing Yet
My dog Jack found a mostly eaten peach, only the pit was there and he swallowed it. He is ten years old and is a flat coated retriever. Is there any thing I could feed him that might help? What should I do?