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What is Peach Pits Poisoning?

Believe it or not, peach (apricots, cherries, and plums) pits can be fatal to your dog. These pits are dangerous for three reasons. For one thing, your dog can choke on them, causing strangulation and death within minutes. In addition, the pits can cause a blockage in your dog’s intestine, which can also be fatal. However, the main reason that peach pits are dangerous to your dog is that they have amygdalin in them, which is toxic, and can cause kidney failure and death within a few days. The foliage of the peach tree is poisonous as well, so if you have any peach (apricot, cherry, or plum) trees on your property, you should be sure your dog is not able to get to the downed fruit, stems, or leaves. Your dog can get acute poisoning if a large amount of peach pits or foliage is consumed at one time, or chronic poisoning if a small amount is eaten over a period of time. The latter is equally as toxic because a dog’s body is unable to process or rid the body of the amygdalin, so it just builds up until a toxic amount is reached.

Peach pits are poisonous to your dog because they (as well as apricots, cherries, and plums) have something called cyanogenic glycosides (amygdalin) inside them, which is a form of cyanide. This toxin slows down the enzymes in your dog’s body that are essential to transport oxygen in the blood. If your dog eats enough of them, amygdalin poisoning can be dangerous and even fatal. For example, if you have peach trees, and your dog eats the peaches off the ground, it will not take too much to make him sick. As a matter of fact, the stems and leaves are also toxic, and can be dangerous for your dog if he consumes them.

Peach Pits Poisoning Average Cost

From 25 quotes ranging from $300 - $3,000

Average Cost

$650

Symptoms of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

The symptoms of both acute and chronic peach pit poisoning are similar, but with chronic poisoning, the symptoms are much milder and come on slower. This makes chronic poisoning much harder to diagnose. The most common symptoms of peach pit poisoning are:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Anorexia
  • Breathing problems
  • Bright red gums and mucous membranes
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Coma
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions (seizures)
  • Coughing
  • Death
  • Dehydration
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Drooling
  • Fever
  • Gastrointestinal irritation
  • Hyperventilation
  • Lethargy
  • Panting
  • Shivering
  • Shock
  • Skin irritation
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness

 Types

  • Acute peach pit (amygdalin) poisoning occurs when your dog ingests a toxic amount of peach pits (or foliage) at one time
  • Chronic peach pit (amygdalin) poisoning occurs over time if your dog is eating a small amount of peach pits (or foliage) over a period of time
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Causes of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

The cause of peach pit poisoning in dogs is the accidental or intentional ingestion of peach pits, which have toxins in them. The amygdalin (cyanogenic glycosides and amygdalin) slows down the body’s ability to deliver oxygen through the blood to the tissues and organs. This slowly suffocates the body, causing loss of consciousness, coma, cardiac arrest, and death among others.

  • Peach pits
  • Peach tree leaves
  • Peach tree foliage
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Diagnosis of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

Your veterinarian will be able to diagnose your dog through your description of his symptoms and what you believe he ate. Additionally, the veterinarian will need to know about your dog’s medical history, any previous illnesses and injuries, and changes in behavior or appetite. The veterinarian will do a complete physical examination, which includes heart rate, respiration, blood pressure, body temperature, height, weight, and reflexes.

It is also necessary to complete some tests on your dog, such as a complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry profile, blood gas, and urinalysis. The veterinarian will also perform liver and kidney function tests, as well as some radiographs (x-rays) to determine the amount of damage that has been done. Kidney and liver biopsies may also be needed.

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Treatment of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

Even if you get your dog to the veterinarian right away after the symptoms have started, treatment may not be successful. By the time the symptoms are evident, the damage done by amygdalin is not reversible, and can be fatal. However, the veterinarian will admit your dog to the hospital and provide oxygen and IV therapy. There are several medications that are effective for peach pit poisoning, which are hydroxylamine hydrochloride, dimethylaminophenol, and amyl nitrite.

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Recovery of Peach Pits Poisoning in Dogs

The chances of recovery are poor, since the medication to treat peach pit poisoning is toxic as well. If your dog recovers, lifespan is shortened depending on the amount of kidney and liver damage that is already done.

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Peach Pits Poisoning Average Cost

From 25 quotes ranging from $300 - $3,000

Average Cost

$650

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Peach Pits Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Mixed breed

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Three Years

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1 found helpful

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My dog probably ate a nectarine pit. He is 55 lbs and it was only one pit. I am hoping it won't cause a blockage because of his size but I am also concerned about the potential cyanide effects. Everything I read provides symptoms but does not indicate how soon putt how long after ingestion these symptoms can occur. I need to know when I should be looking for them. Thank you.

Sept. 28, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. If he did not chew the pit, the cyanide effects should not occur. If he did chew the pit, it would not take long for the effects of cyanide to occur, and it would be best to have him seen by a veterinarian if you see any of those signs.

Oct. 8, 2020

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Rhodesian Ridgeback

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Twelve Weeks

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I think she ate a whole peach pit.

Sept. 28, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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2 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. There is a high possibility that she will have a foreign body if she did swallow the peach pit, and she may need x-rays. If she starts vomiting, having diarrhea, is lethargic, or doesn't want to eat, then it would be best to have her seen right away by a veterinarian.

Oct. 8, 2020

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Beagle

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Five Months

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Noisy Breathing

I think my dog may have chronic peach pit poisoning she is very lethargic and restless how can I be sure

Sept. 27, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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Thank you for your question. . There are many things that can cause that in a puppy, including parasites and infectious diseases. If you think that she has a problem, It would be best to have your pet seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get any treatment that they might need.

Oct. 13, 2020

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Great dane pitbull mix

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4-5 months old

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He ate 2 pieces of frozen peach slices

Sept. 27, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I do not believe that that small amount of peach will cause any toxicities or GI upset for your dog.

Oct. 14, 2020

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Beagle

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5-6 years

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2 found helpful

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My dog ate one peach pit . About 4 hours ago. He has no symptoms what should I do

Aug. 6, 2020

Owner

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Jessica N. DVM

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2 Recommendations

Hello- Thank you for your question. I would recommend taking him to your vet right away. The pits can be toxic, but my other concern would be that depending on its size it could become lodged in your dogs stomach or small intestine and cause an intestinal blockage that would require surgery. If you go to your vet now they can take x-rays to see if they can visualize it in the stomach. If it's still there they may be able to make him vomit to get it up. Take care!

Aug. 6, 2020

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Mungtas

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Rottweiler

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4 Years

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Nothing Yet

I was feeding my dog a small peach because she enjoys eating them. she was nearly finished eating her peach when I noticed she has accidentally eaten the whole peach pit.nothing bad has happened yet but I'm worried something will happen to her overnight while everyone is asleep and she sleeps outside. I'm worried something bad will happen to her in the next few days, should I be worried? please get to me asap

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Greysen

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Jack Russell Terrier

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2 Years

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Tired
No Clear Symptoms Yet

Greysen accidentally swallowed a peach pit whole that was lying around and he has a good appetite and doesn't seem to have any serious symptoms yet but I am extremely worried and don't know what to do. Please get back to me as soon as you can.

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Mushu

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French Bulldog

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1 Year

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Fair severity

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Fair severity

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Hello, I have a 1.5 year old French Bulldog he weighs 28 lbs and I just found him chewing on a peach pit (10 min ago). It was left in pieces but I have no idea if he ate any of it. He normally throws up when he drinks water too fast or eats to fast. Should I take him to the vet? He hasn't yet showed any signs but I am worried as I seen they were poisonous.

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Coco

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Bernedoodle

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7 Months

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Vomiting

Yesterday at about 7:00 pm , coco accidentally swallowed a whole nectarine pit . We tried giving him the hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting but woke up vomiting about 3:45. He weighs about 50lb and the only symptom is vomiting. He is acting normal and has eaten like he has always done. So far in all the vomiting he has done the nectarine pit has not come out yet. Do you think he might be able to digest it and It might come out I’m his stool or should we take him to the vet to induce more vomiting. He hasn’t vomited this morning yet and his stool is kind of loose sometimes.

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Little Man

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miniature dachshund

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4 Years

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None Yet

My 10 lb miniature dachshund just ate an entire peach. He didn’t eat the pit (I found it in tact on the ground). In case it’s pertinant - he’s had pancreatitis in the past (several months ago) and I’ve been feeding him a low fat diet for about a month now because he seems to have sensitive digestion. I can’t get ahold of my vet. Please advise.

Peach Pits Poisoning Average Cost

From 25 quotes ranging from $300 - $3,000

Average Cost

$650

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