Smoke Inhalation Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $300 - 6,000

Average Cost

$1,500

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What is Smoke Inhalation?

There are different degrees of smoke inhalation in dogs, and how much smoke has been inhaled determines the various symptoms and required treatment options. When your pet inhales smoke, they are breathing in harmful chemicals, such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and cyanide. Inhalation of these chemicals affects delivery of oxygen to tissues, leading to many serious conditions—up to and including death.

Smoke inhalation is caused by the inhalation of dangerous chemicals found in smoke and soot caused by fire. The severity of the smoke inhalation largely influences the symptoms, treatment and recovery. When smoke inhalation occurs, the delivery of oxygen to tissues, especially in the lungs, is affected. Symptoms typically result from this lack of oxygen, including trouble breathing, irritated eyes, and extreme coughing or wheezing. Possible treatments include oxygen therapy, medications and rest.

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Symptoms of Smoke Inhalation in Dogs

The degree of smoke inhalation determines the severity of symptoms and likelihood of recovery. Some common symptoms to watch for include:

  • Extreme coughing or wheezing
  • Red, irritated eyes
  • Lethargy and weakness
  • Increased, difficulty breathing
  • Inner mouth burns, swelling, or inflammation
  • Foaming at the math
  • Seizures
  • Burns to the skin and eyes
  • Singed or burnt hair
  • Vomiting
  • Abnormal behavior
Types

Smoke inhalation in dogs is largely classified by degree of smoke inhalation and chemical makeup of the smoke itself. What chemical components the smoke contains depend primarily on the type of burning material. The most fatal chemical component in a fire is carbon monoxide. There are three specific classes of inhalation injury:

  • Inhalation injury focused in the upper airways
  • Inhalation injury focused in the lower airways and pulmonary parenchyma
  • System toxicity, caused by inhalation of toxic gases such as carbon monoxide and cyanide

It is possible to have multiple classes of injury, depending on the degree of inhalation and the composition of the fire.

Causes of Smoke Inhalation in Dogs

Most cases of severe smoke inhalation come from house fires. The fire causes chemicals in smoke and soot to be inhaled by the pet, restricting oxygen delivery to the tissues of lungs. Depending on the materials being burned, additional dangerous toxins—such as acrolein or cyanide—may enter the body.

Diagnosis of Smoke Inhalation in Dogs

When you take your pet to the veterinarian, be sure to tell them of all symptoms you’ve noticed and if you are aware of any possible smoke inhalation. Give them specific details to aid in their diagnosis. The veterinarian will conduct a physical exam and likely run blood and/or urine tests to determine the causation of the exhibited symptoms.

In cases of smoke inhalation, these tests will likely reveal cells that are experiencing an oxygen deficiency as a result of the various toxic chemicals inhaled. The veterinarian will then be able to determine the best course of treatment to help your pet heal. Treatments will vary depending on the severity of the smoke inhalation and any accompanying injuries. Additional concerns with smoke inhalation are any other burns or injuries associated with the fire from which the smoke was inhaled.

Treatment of Smoke Inhalation in Dogs

The course of treatment will depend significantly on the severity of the inhalation and damage to the airways, as well as any accompanying injuries that require treatment. There are a few treatment options that may be considered, depending on your dog’s individual condition:

  • Oxygen therapy: Much like it sounds, oxygen therapy provides your body with extra oxygen to accommodate the oxygen deficiency from smoke inhalation.
  • Antibiotics: The use of antibiotics can aid in pain management and overall recovery from smoke inhalation and other injuries.
  • Anti-inflammatory medications: Anti-inflammatory medications can assist in relieving damage to the airways caused by smoke inhalation.
  • Rest: As with any injury, rest will aid in recuperation.

Recovery of Smoke Inhalation in Dogs

Post-treatment recovery and management will vary depending on the severity of the damage. Recovery time can range from a short period of time to a lengthy recovery period.

Through the recovery period there will be numerous check-ups with the veterinarian to monitor oxygen levels in the body, healing of airways, and overall recovery. One of the largest risks during recovery from smoke inhalation is the development of pneumonia as a result of the damage done to the lungs. Paying close attention to your pet and relaying any unusual activity or symptoms to your veterinarian can aid in your pet’s recovery.

Smoke Inhalation Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Roderick
Golden Retreiver
3 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Sneezing and clear mucus

We have a 3 year old golden retriever who was trapped in our burning house for about 15 whilst it was full of smoke. He came out looking absolutely fine and has been given anti inflammatory injection by survey, but has started to sneeze lot and seems lethargic and sad. Is this normal or should we be insisting on a follow up from the vet, he is full of beans when taken for a walk but goes downhill when satdoing nothing

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Good to hear that Roderick made it out of your home, many pets (and unfortunately people) are not so lucky. The problem with house fires is the smoke, but more specifically the type of smoke; there are many different types of building materials and furniture materials which may have been manufactured decades ago before certain building codes and regulations were put in place. Some types of smoke or vapours from different materials may cause a variety of different symptoms; I would recommend you visit your Veterinarian for a general examination, x-ray and blood tests to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kloey
Yorkie poo
5yrs
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Runny Nose
Coughing and gagging
Warm to touch

I have a Yorkie poo, small 7lbs, she's 6yrs old. This evening she has started coughing and gagging like she's trying to clear her throat. To my knowledge there isn't anything stuck in there. She's warm to the touch, not really lethargic more than usual because she sleeps most of the time, her gums are warm and dark pink almost red. We have a wood burning fireplace and I'm concerned if maybe she inhaled smoke or if it's something else. Activity doesn't make it worse that I've noticed, but it just started this evening so I've not got much observation to go on. She's not on heartworm medicine either and hasn't had anyour preventative medicine for it at all. Any ideas other than just to monitor her and see if it worsens? Thanks.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Whilst the symptoms don’t match carbon monoxide poisoning; I will mention that if you have a wood burning stove, ensure that it is serviced annually to ensure you aren’t putting your life at risk, a small dog can be like a canary in a coal mine as they are more adversely affected by small amount of carbon monoxide than humans. Installation of carbon monoxide detectors can be life savers. Please read the Green Bay Press Gazette link below. Smoke, like anything from your wood burning stove shouldn’t leak and should go up the flue. Other causes of coughing and gagging maybe due to infection, fluid on the lungs, chemical irritants (did you change cleaning products recently?) or tumours. Whether you choose to monitor or visit your Veterinarian, I still recommend having your wood burning stove serviced and having carbon monoxide detectors in your home for precaution. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
https://www.vetary.com/dog/condition/carbon-monoxide-poisoning
http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/story/news/2016/11/30/carbon-monoxide-poisons-three/94655972/

Unfortunately me and my dog are stuck living in an rv with a smoker. Now I'm worried about my little chihuahua, he has started to get a cough. It sounds like he has mucus. How can I help him? I have two air purifiers, try keeping the window open, and keep him away from the smoke. We are trying to get our own place. Any ideas to help him would greatly help.

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Kuddles
Dalmatian
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Having trouble breathing vomiting

My boyfriend is trying to fix wood stove we have but everyday someone has the door open or a leak she has thrown up once and now her breathing is like she's having a asthma attack

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. If Kuddles is having problems breathing and vomtiing, she should see a veterinarian right away. WIthout examining her, I can't tell if she is okay or not, but a veterinarian will be able to examine her and determine why she is having those signs.

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Toby
Walker coonhound
1 Year
Critical condition
-1 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Not Eating
Excessive drool
Runny Nose
Heavy Breathing

Medication Used

Oxygen
Anti swelling medication
antibiotics

My dog was in a house fire, and he is breathing heavily, and just standing around. Sometimes he looks okay but sometimes he looks super bad. We are giving him antibiotics and oxygen and water and stuff to stop the swelling but he is not eating. Do you have any suggestions about what to do? Or how bad you think his condition may be? Please help. Also, he is a pretty big dog

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Smoke inhalation in dogs is thankfully uncommon but is very severe when it does occur; the mainstay of treatment is supportive and symptomatic care which may include oxygen supplementation, hydroxocobalamin (in case cyanide compounds were inhaled), albuterol (for bronchodilation) along with other care as needed (fluids etc…). Recovery can be slow, but I am unable to give you any specifics as I haven’t examined Toby and do not know how long he was exposed to the smoke for. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/smoke-inhalation/overview-of-smoke-inhalation

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Xanadu
Dutch Shepherd
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Coughing tired
Coughing

MY dryer melted and filled my house with smoke for about 2 hours last night. It was thick smoke but we let the dogs out right away. She's coughing a lot today and she seems to be coughing up nothing. My other 2 dogs seem fine. A little tired is all. What can I do to help her? The fireman said the house was safe and nothing burned, just the dryer and the things on top of the dryer melted.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Some dogs (like some people) are more sensitive to smoke than others, also the type of smoke and any airborne chemicals may also cause more severe symptoms. I would recommend that you visit your Veterinarian as Xanadu may require some medical management or may require some other therapy. Without examining him, I cannot say what he requires specifically. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/smoke-inhalation/ www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/smoke-inhalation/overview-of-smoke-inhalation

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Shadow
Basset Hound
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Hacking cough

On December 12th we had a house fire. One of our dogs passed due to smoke inhalation. The other dog was hospitalized but did make it. He was closely monitored and on a range of antibiotics and steroids then he was discharged to his normal vets care. His normal vet shared that they do not know a whole lot about smoke inhalation in dogs though they have done a great job researching.

My question is...will he always have this hacking cough? He did get a cold once a few weeks ago and had to go back on antibiotics and steroids but normally he will start hacking periodically throughout the day/night but worse with excretion. Is there anything we can do to improve this cough?

He is a Basset Hound/Australian Shepherd mix.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
It is possible that the cough may be a long term issue due to the irritation to the respiratory tract and all the toxic components of a house fire; we never quite know exactly what a dog has inhaled in these situations. The main problem is that the literature we have on smoke inhalation covers the emergency care but not the long term management or effects of smoke inhalation; also there are contradictory treatments in some literature which can make a decision difficult when cross referencing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/smoke-inhalation/overview-of-smoke-inhalation www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/smoke-inhalation/

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