Pesticides Poisoning Average Cost

From 23 quotes ranging from $300 - 6,000

Average Cost

$950

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What is Pesticides Poisoning?

Pesticides are either chemical or natural substances that are produced naturally or scientifically to kill pests. These agents are created to attract, entice, and then kill unwanted predators or substances. These biocides are used to kill a variety of unwanted bugs, plants, fungi, rodents, larvae, and bacteria. Unfortunately, pesticides are prevalent; they are found in a variety of places such as in homes, garages, on farms, in sheds, in the yard, and on plants. Pesticides should not be used outdoors when the dog is present, as this is one way poisoning can occur.

If the dog has come into contact with a very small amount of pesticide, such as a whiff of spray from a spray can, general irritation may occur and may not be a cause for alarm. However, if the dog is showing any signs of distress or if you know that your dog has ingested a form of pesticide, it is imperative to get him to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

Pesticides poisoning in dogs transpires as a result of consuming or inhaling various forms of pesticides. Pesticide poisoning in dogs is not uncommon, namely because pesticides are readily used in and around the home or in public areas.

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Symptoms of Pesticides Poisoning in Dogs

Since there are many types of pesticides, there are a wide variety of symptoms due to poisoning. Symptoms of pesticide poisoning in dogs include:

  • Vomiting
  • Rapid breathing
  • Distress
  • Diarrhea
  • Drooling
  • Confusion
  • Excessive drinking 
  • Pawing at the face or eyes
  • Dilation of pupils
  • Lethargy
  • Tremors
  • Skin irritations
  • Skin rashes
  • Burns
  • Seizures
  • Arrhythmia
  • Collapse
  • Coma
  • Death

Types

There are many types of pesticides, and these poisons are characterized by the types and usage. Types of pesticides are:

  • Herbicides, used to kill unwanted plants or vegetation
  • Insecticides, used to kill insects
  • Rodenticides, used to kill rats and mice
  • Fungicides, used to kill fungi
  • Bactericides, such as disinfectants or antiseptics to kill bacteria
  • Larvicides, used to kill mosquitoes or larvae

Causes of Pesticides Poisoning in Dogs

The cause of pesticide poisoning in dogs is from the ingestion or inhalation of a specific type of pesticide. Pesticide poisoning negatively affects the dog by:

  • Adversely affecting the central nervous system
  • Inhibiting central nervous system enzymes
  • Causing chemical burns on the skin, and the mouth, or in the eyes
  • Adversely affecting enzymes of other organ systems, such as the heart, liver, and kidneys

Diagnosis of Pesticides Poisoning in Dogs

If you suspect your dog has come into contact with a pesticide, immediately take him to the veterinarian. It is important to communicate with your veterinarian about your dog’s history of contact with any pesticide, even if you are not positive that he ingested or inhaled any of the compound. Even if you suspect any contact, the veterinarian will have more of an idea on what to do in terms of diagnosing and treating your companion.

The veterinarian will do a complete examination including any blood work, urinalysis, and a biochemistry profile. The biochemistry profile will be used to evaluate the functions of your dog’s kidney, pancreas, sugar processes, and liver. Another very important part of evaluating your dog will be the careful monitoring of his clinical signs. The veterinarian will also test your dog’s electrolyte levels to be sure the poisoning is not dehydrating him or causing an electrolyte balance abnormality.

If you are completely sure that your dog ingested a type of pesticide, your veterinarian may choose to begin treatment immediately as he is waiting on the results of testing. Each situation is different, and your veterinarian is trained to look at the symptoms and make a diagnosis of toxicity.

Treatment of Pesticides Poisoning in Dogs

Depending on the type of pesticide your dog ingested, and the severity of his condition, your veterinarian will begin treatment. Treatment may include the following methods:

Removal of Residue

If your dog has come into contact with the pesticide on his skin and fur, he will need bathing to remove any residue from the pesticides. Your veterinarian will use the proper shampoo or detergent to effectively remove the pesticide.

Emesis

If your dog ingested type of pesticide that is not a hydrocarbon, the veterinarian may induce vomiting to help him get rid of the poison. It is important to not use vomiting if the dog has consumed hydrocarbons since much damage, such as aspiration into the lungs, can occur.

Activated Charcoal

Activated charcoal may be given to absorb the toxic substances that have been left over even after vomiting. Activated charcoal prevents the poison from entering the dog’s system.

Drugs

Depending on the type of pesticide ingested, the veterinarian will make the decision on the types of medications that are needed. For example, atropine is used in many poisonings to stabilize the central nervous system.

IV Fluids and Oxygen Therapy

IV fluids may be given if the dog is dehydrated and oxygen therapy is effective in assisting the dog with breathing during times of respiratory distress.

Recovery of Pesticides Poisoning in Dogs

Recovery depends on the type of pesticide, the amount ingested, and the response time for treatment. If your dog has positively responded to treatment, your veterinarian will want to keep a watchful eye on him for at least 24 hours. The physician will tell you any information you need in regards to your dog’s recovery and prognosis.

Since there are many types of pesticides, the severity of the toxicity will vary, as will the recovery process. If your dog is recovering at home, it is important to contact your veterinarian if any symptoms develop that cause alarm. Your veterinarian will give you instructions on your dog’s aftercare and management. He will also want to see him at a follow-up appointment to be sure he is recovering properly.

Pesticides Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Dexter
Boxer
10 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

No symptoms, sudden death.

Our ten-year-old boxer passed away over night, two days after we had the house and yard professionally sprayed for fleas/ticks. I had applied Frontline to him about a week or two prior to having the home treated. There were absolutely no signs of distress or illness! Is it possible that he died from the pesticide, or is this likely just due to old age and a coincidence? I am torn up not knowing!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
Without know what your house was sprayed with specifically, I cannot determine whether or not it may have contributed to his passing; I would recommend that you ask the company which performed the spraying to give you the MSDS documents and check them over as they would normally indicator dangers towards pets and time frames between application and allowing pets in the area. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Pup-Pup
Cocker Spaniel
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Jerking, tremors severe

My pup started having severe jerking a few hours after application of advantix multi. It is more noticible when he is at rest. I washed the area with soap and water. This is the 3rd night he has been affected. I didn’t go to the vet because I knew they’d run a bunch of tests I really can’t afford right now and I’m sure it’s the advantix. Is there anything I can do to help him or should I take him on to his vet? I thought it would be out of system by now and I feel horrible for letting this baby suffer.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1385 Recommendations
The best thing to do is to continue to wash the advantix, with a shampoo to get rid of all of it on his skin. The chemical can take time to leave his body, and if he is eating and drinking and slowly improving, you may be okay to continue to monitor him. IF he is not getting better, isn't eating or drinking, starts vomiting or having diarrhea, or starts seizuring, he needs to be seen by a veterinarian immediately. I hope that all goes well for Pup Pup.

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Nas
pitbull
9 Months
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

Both my dogs seem to have gotten into bug spray for the yard. One is a 9 month old pitbull about 45 lbs, the other is a 1 year beagle about 25 lbs. my pitbull seems to have the most symptoms as he has vomited 4 times all smell of the insecticide, not too strongly though, he was also coughing & gagging. He also seemed to have hiccups. My pitbull stopped vomiting but he is still coughing a bit. My beagle was coughing & hacking no vomit. I gave them activated charcoal as recommended by my vet but I wanted a second opinion. I gave my pitbull about 4 pills & my beagle 3 but I wanted to know if I should do something else I should do besides activated charcoal & monitoring them for 24 hours. The insecticide is called Spectracide with Gamma-Cyhalothrin

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1385 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Typically, therapy for oral toxins is decontamination and activated charcoal, as your veterinarian has recommended. Signs of most insecticides include vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures. I'm not sure what time frame has passed since they were exposed to the spray, but monitoring them for ongoing signs is a good idea, and seeking supportive care from your veterinarian if the vomiting persists, if they develop diarrhea, or if they appear to have any neurologic signs.

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Sandie
Chihuahua
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My dog is about 4lbs and 10 years old. She was exposed to bug pesticides and has vomited 3 times. I bathed her and gave her about a 1/4 cup of milk not sure if that was ok. She has stopped vomiting just rubbing her eye and is laying in her pillow. She seems to be doing ok. Anymore recommendations?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1385 Recommendations
Whether you need to be concerned for Sandie depends on what type of pesticides she has been exposed to. Since I don't know that information, it would be a good idea to call the pet poison control hotline, have the product information available, and find out what actions you need to take, it any. This website has the phone number and information that you will need: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control

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Angus
Pit bull
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting
Vomiting blood and grass

Angus vomited a small amount of mucus and blood earlier this evening. It also had grass in it. It was only the one time and has no other symptoms. He got through the fence into the garden this morning. My husband sprayed the area with barrier weed killer on Sunday. We have had some rain since the area was sprayed. What should I do and what should I watch for? We cannot afford a vet bill right now so I'm concerned and want to do all I can to help him.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
I would recommend contacting Gordon’s USA (816-421-4070) to ask them about the problems in pets and how long is needed after application for it to be safe, generally a few hours or a day is sufficient but best to ask. It is possible that the grass only was enough to cause vomiting, but I would recommend calling Gordon’s USA to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Choco
pit bull terrier
5 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Disorientation

My 5month old pitbull came in contact with raid bug spray inside the house. A few hours after he started acting different. I noticed that his mouth or throat are swollen. His having a hard time eating. Is there any medication over the counter that I can give him?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
You should try to rinse out Choco’s mouth if recently exposed, but there is no over the counter treatment for this type of poisoning and may be fatal in some cases. You should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian for an examination and supportive or symptomatic care as appropriate; you should also call the manufacturer (800-558-5252) or the Pet Poison Helpline for product specific (Raid has many products) information on animal poisoning. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/pesticides/

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Lulu
Shisu
7 years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Symptons are listed above.

I think my dog might have been poisoned by bug spray, or possibly bit by something, not real sure. She is a 7 year old female, small dog. She is very, very restless for the past 4 to 5 hours. Very disoriented. Jerking some, wining, and unusual growling. I sprayed my house today, but left her in closed room for about 6 hours were I had not sprayed. A hour ago I gave her a bath in dawn soap. Then I mopped all of the floors. No veterinary's are open this late, Its midnight here in Texas.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
I would recommend reading the instructions on the bug spray and calling a helpline number found on the can or by calling the Pet Poison Helpline; there are many different products with different ingredients which have different effects and cause symptoms of varying severity. The ingredients in a spray and the level of exposure are important. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/pesticides/

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Erica
Caucasian Shepherd (Mountain Dog)
1year and 2 weeks
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting ..eye reddish and too weak

I used Amitraz animal spray on my dog and it has really affected her and she's been down . She's been treated but vomits and can't cough well . What more can I do ?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
Amitraz poisoning has various symptoms which may include vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy, neurological symptoms as well as a slowing of the heart rate; treatment is mainly supportive which includes fluids and management of symptoms, atipamezole and yohimbine may be used by a Veterinarian as an antidote. Other than this it is just continued supportive care, if you haven’t visited your Veterinarian I recommend that you do. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chewy
Shih Tzu
6 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

my dog was in a yard full of pesticide today,so far he isnt experiencing any symptoms within the last 10 hours.He may have sniffed the yard a little but nothing more.Should I be worried? How long does it take for the symptoms to take effect?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1385 Recommendations
Most pesticides cause GI signs - vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, decreased appetite. If Chewy is not showing any of those signs 10 hours later, he probably did not actually lick any of the pesticides, but it would be a good idea to keep a close eye on him for the next couple of days.

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Bear
Yorkie
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Not Moving

Dog had fleas all over him like hundreds we used some Bens mosquito spray on him and the fleas just started falling off dead . Afraid it might have poisoned him this was like 2 weeks ago .

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
I couldn’t find a specific mosquito repellent manufactured by Ben’s, but there are a few different products some which contain DEET and others which do not. I would highly recommend you call Ben’s on 1-800-241-6401 or the Pet Poison Helpline on 1-855-764-7661 for product specific information so that you can follow up with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/condition/deet-toxicity www.benmeadows.com/custserv/ www.petpoisonhelpline.com

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Dag Finnius
Miniature Australian Shepherd
2 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Restless
scratching
Breathing Difficulties
Wheezing
Running Nose

I treated my dog with Frontline Plus, then treated the house with Diatemacious Earth to get the fleas from the carpets, left on for a few hours then vacuumed. As the fleas are dying, he is distressed, rapid breathing of 30-60 breaths/min. I've combed a good amount of dead fleas off, and that seemed to help but his breathing has not slowed much. I've used DE around the house before, and he never reacted this way. Can I clean inside his nose with a Qtip? Thanks for your help.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
You shouldn’t try to clean out Dag Finnius’ nose with a Qtip since the nose will drain naturally if it is running and nature is already flushing it out; you should hover the carpets one more time and try using a fipronil (same active ingredient as Frontline) based spray next time and for now air out your home a little bit as well (if it is not too cold). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Rolo
Mastiff Great dane boxer mix
2 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Discharge from the eyes
Swollen red eyes
Pussing, bleeding wounds

My dog has puss and bleeding around his mouth and under his chin and has developed what looks like an eye infection. I'm worried that one of my neighbors may have put a pesticide on their grass and that he's somehow gotten a chemical burn from it.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
If you’re suspecting that one of your neighbours has applied something to their garden you should ask them to be on the safe side and so you know what was applied; it is possible that Rolo may have come into contact with something but I cannot say for sure without examining him. You should visit your Veterinarian if there is severe irritation especially with him being so young. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Reavie
Longhaired Chihuahua and Pomeranian
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Looking around rapidly
Rubbing paws on face and nose
can't sit still
Whining
anxious

My dog was exposed to Raid max bug spray is there anything I can do at home to help my dog. I gave him a bath washed his paws with dawn dish soap and rinsed his eyes with water gave him food and water but he's still winning getting his paws and rubbing them on his nose and face.his also acting very anxious laying down getting up running back and forth like he can't get comfortable or stay still.I can not afford a vet right now. I just left a abusive marriage after 20 years I have no income nothing .will you please help me

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2959 Recommendations
Bathing Reavie with a mild soap was a good initial step, I would highly recommend you call S. C. Johnson’s consumer line on (800) 558-5252 for more information or the Pet Poison Helpline on (855) 764-7661 for specific help. Many times in exposure to these types of chemicals, bathing the animal and waiting out the symptoms is the best course of action; other times symptomatic and supportive care may be needed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://scjdmcdn.azureedge.net/~/media/raid/products/pdf/raid-max-bug-barrier-new.pdf www.petpoisonhelpline.com/

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