How to Bathe a Dog With a Yeast Infection

  • Home >
  • Grooming >
  • How to Bathe a Dog With a Yeast Infection
Medium
20 - 45 Minutes
1 Week

Introduction

It’s summertime!  It’s 100 degrees Fahrenheit in the shade, and a great way to cool off is a trip to the lake--time for some fun with your water-loving pooch who loves to swim! But a few days after your trip to the lake your dog is scratching himself all over, his skin is red, he's developing sores, and he smells awful!  

Unfortunately, your dog has probably picked up a yeast infection. Although bacteria and other microorganisms like yeast live naturally on your dog, and many are beneficial, when circumstances conspire to put your dog's natural microflora out of balance, yeast on your dog's skin can overpopulate causing an infection characterized by inflammation, redness, itchiness and smelly sores. Moisture is one of the number one causes of yeast infection development; lake water is a major culprit. Also, your dog sweats on his paws and can get yeast infections between his toes or in his ears. Hot summer months make yeast infections more common, and skin that is overheated by the sun is especially susceptible. Parasites, diet, and allergies can also contribute to yeast infections. If your dog has an invasive infection or one that covers a large part of his body, you should seek veterinary attention as oral and topical medications may be required.  You can also bathe your dog to treat yeast infections and relieve symptoms.

Dog's Perspective

If your dog has a yeast infection he will be one unhappy pooch. Yeast infections are irritating and itchy, and your dog may be sensitive about his skin, so be cautious when handling and bathing to see how your dog reacts and adjust accordingly. Also, remember that several health conditions can contribute to a yeast infection, such as dietary issues, metabolic conditions, and parasites.  If your dog is suffering from another condition that a yeast infection is secondary to, he may require medical care.

The Medicated Baths Method

Effective
0 Votes
Shampoo
Dryer
Towel
Step
1
Use medicated anti-fungal shampoo
Obtain a medicated anti fungal shampoo from your veterinarian or pet supply store. Follow the directions on the product.
Step
2
Wet down
Wet your dog down with a hand held shower or by pouring water over him. Avoid immersing in hot or warm water unless directed to do so, as this can aggravate yeast.
Step
3
Apply medicated shampoo
Apply commercial anti-fungal shampoo all over your dog's body, starting at the head and working back to the tail.
Step
4
Use washcloth on face
Apply shampoo on a washcloth and wash the face, carefully avoiding eyes, nose, mouth and ears. If ears are infected these can be addressed separately with a commercial anti-fungal ear wash. Avoid getting water in your dog's ears during bathing.
Step
5
Rinse and dry
Rinse as directed by your shampoo product. Pat dry with a towel, taking care not to rub irritated skin. Allow your dog to air dry somewhere that is not too hot or too cold or use a blow dryer on a cool setting.
Recommend grooming method?

The Natural Treatment Method

Effective
0 Votes
Shampoo
Dryer
Towel
Step
1
Prepare vinegar or tea tree shampoo
Prepare a vinegar shampoo, dilute apple cider vinegar with water. If necessary, you can add Dawn dish soap. A mixture of 1 cup water to ¼ cup vinegar and ¼ cup soap is common. You can put the mixture in a squeeze bottle like an empty, clean ketchup bottle. Another option is to use a tea tree oil-based shampoo.
Step
2
Wet down dog
Wet your dog with a handheld shower, or by pouring water over him. Avoid immersing him in water.
Step
3
Apply shampoo
Apply vinegar or tea tree oil shampoo and work all over body from neck to tail, ensure the abdomen and legs are well shampooed.
Step
4
Rinse
Rinse thoroughly with water. You can put a small amount of vinegar in rinse water to further address the yeast infection, or to address itching you can dissolve baking soda, 2 tbsp per gallon of water, and rinse your dog with the mixture. However, remember that baking soda and vinegar react so do not use these products together. If using baking soda rinse after vinegar shampoo, rinse well in between.
Step
5
Treat affected areas between baths
Swab ears with witch hazel on a cotton ball after a bath and between baths as necessary. Between baths, massage melted coconut oil, about 8 oz mixed with 1 drops lavender oil and 2 drops of lemon oil, into affected areas.
Recommend grooming method?

Caution & Considerations

  • Remember your dog may be experiencing discomfort, make adjustments as necessary when handling a dog with a yeast infection.
  • Get veterinary attention and medication for serious infections with sores and widespread yeast infections. Medication may be topical or oral.
  • Be sure to address the cause of the yeast infection. Check to see if diet, medical disorder, allergies or parasites are a contributing factor and address root causes.
  • Avoid hot sun and moisture and excessive exercise in hot conditions to reduce yeast infection flare-ups. Bathe your dog after swimming in ponds or lake water to prevent microorganism growth on the skin. 
  • Be careful with commercial and herbal products. Test an area of your dog's skin with the product first if you have concerns about sensitive skin and possible adverse reactions.

Conclusion

Yeast infections are uncomfortable for your dog and unpleasant for you, as dog scratching and smelly skin make your pup a poor roommate. Get medical attention for severe cases, or when medical conditions are suspected. Bathing your dog with commercial antifungals, tea tree shampoos or vinegar will help put yeast organisms back in their place. Rinses to keep yeast at bay or address itching are also useful to ensure your dog's comfort  Remember, prevention is the best way to address yeast infections, so avoid factors like moisture and other contributing factors to avoid flare-ups in the first place.

Success Stories and Grooming Questions

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!