Hysterectomy in Dogs

Veterinary reviewed by: Michele K.

Hysterectomy in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention

Veterinary reviewed by: Michele K.

Hysterectomy in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention

What is Hysterectomy?

A hysterectomy, or “ovary-sparing spay”, is a procedure in which a dog's entire uterus is removed, but the ovaries are left intact. This surgery contrasts from the traditional spay, or ovariohysterectomy, with which both the uterus and the ovaries are removed. A hysterectomy may be performed in large or giant dog breeds, as recent studies have shown possible benefits to these breeds keeping their hormone balances. The ovaries are a key part of hormone regulation in the body. By retaining them in the body, the risk of developing certain diseases can be significantly reduced. This can lead to a longer life for the dog.

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Hysterectomy Procedure in Dogs

Like with a regular spay, the dog will first have to have its blood work run to ensure that it is a good surgical candidate and that it will be able to handle general anesthesia. If the dog is deemed suitable, the surgery will be booked. A larger incision will be made than with a traditional spay, so that the uterus can be fully visualized throughout the operation. 

It is pulled to the surface so that the entire uterus can be tied off and removed right at the cervix, generally between the ovaries and the uterine horn. It is paramount that the whole of the uterus is removed to prevent stump pyometra from developing. The procedure may take slightly more time than a full spay due to the fact that it is not performed as often and the incision will take longer to close, as it is bigger. Either sutures or staples may be used to the surgical incision.

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Efficacy of Hysterectomy in Dogs

A hysterectomy is completely effective at rendering the dog incapable of breeding. If performed correctly, there should be minimal risk of stump pyometra. The dog will still go into heat, and mild discharge or blood may be seen. This procedure is permanent and will only need to be done once. The chances of resulting health issues are low, with the dog being at lower risk of developing many cancers and diseases than with an ovariohysterectomy. 

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Hysterectomy Recovery in Dogs

The recovery for a hysterectomy is very similar to that of a traditional spay. The veterinarian will prescribe painkillers and all activity should be reduced for several weeks while the animal heals. Putting an Elizabethan collar on the dog will keep it from licking or biting at its incision. Food should be slowly introduced within the first two days after surgery. If the dog begins to vomit, report this to your veterinarian. Monitor the incision site for any signs of infection. Any breathing difficulties should also be made known to the vet.

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Cost of Hysterectomy in Dogs

An ovary-sparing spay tends to cost significantly more than a standard spay. Prices may range from $750 to $5,000 depending on the size of the dog and the veterinarian you see. Not all vets offer this surgery, so finding one near you may be a challenge. The procedure might be gaining popularity, so more and more locations should be adopting the technique. Because it is often done in giant breeds, it can be paired with a gastropexy (tacking of the stomach) to prevent gastric dilation-volvulus (GDV). The cost may not be much more to have both procedures complete, as they may be done through the same incision.

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Worried about the cost of Hysterectomy treatment?

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Dog Hysterectomy Considerations

As with any surgery, complications may arise from the use of general anesthesia. If any of the uterus remains after surgery, the dog may be susceptible to stump pyometra, which can be life-threatening. Leaving the ovaries in the dog may contribute to the growth in mammary tumors. As the dog ages, she will be more at risk for this problem. Adopting an annual mammary gland ultrasound into your vet care routine may help identify these tumors in their early stages.

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Hysterectomy Prevention in Dogs

Hysterectomy is an elective surgery that is performed to prevent the onset of many adverse health issues such as bone cancer and joint problems. In addition to the prevention of pregnancy and serious health conditions, it can also lessen the likelihood of the dog becoming obese or being incontinent. Intact females will remain at risk of developing pyometra, which is often difficult to diagnose until it's too late, and will also experience a full heat if no spay is performed.

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Hysterectomy Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Pit Bull

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Seven Months

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9 found helpful

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9 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Prolapse

How much does a hysterectomy for a dog with a prolapse usually coast

Aug. 6, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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9 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, the cost of surgery varies greatly depending on where you live, who is doing the surgery, and the degree of complications. Without knowing more about your dog, there is no way that I can give that estimate for you. What you can do, is call a veterinarian in your area, give them the situation, and get an estimate for surgery from them. I hope that all goes well for your dog.

Aug. 6, 2020

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Rodeshian ridgeback

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Ten Years

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10 found helpful

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10 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Not Eating Whiny After A Hysterectomy A Week Ago

Full hysterectomy she developed pyrometry and she not eating well cut her antibiotics down thinking her tummy upset so vet giving her probiotics but she still not eat much and now carries her toy in her mouth and whines

July 22, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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10 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. At her age, that infection and surgery is a major procedure. It may take some time for her to recover from the surgery and the anesthesia. If she is having troubles, the best thing to do maybe to have a recheck with your veterinarian, as they can assess her, examine her, and see if she is okay. She may need further antibiotics, or pain medications. I hope that all goes well for her.

July 22, 2020

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