Bladder Inflammation Average Cost

From 431 quotes ranging from $200 - 2,000

Average Cost

$350

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What is Bladder Inflammation?

The most common condition of the feline bladder is inflammation of the urinary bladder, or cystitis. This condition in cats is called feline idiopathic cystitis, and it often indicates that there is another problem present in the urinary system.

Problems in the urinary system are difficult to miss in felines, but these issues can be difficult to diagnose and manage due to the complicated causes that may be present. Affecting both male and female cats whether they are intact or altered, inflammation of the bladder causes many irritating and painful symptoms and is typically a chronic condition for cats who experience it.

Symptoms of Bladder Inflammation in Cats

Owners most frequently recognize the symptoms of bladder inflammation when they become frustrated with changes in their cat's behavior both inside and out of the litter box. The signs of cystitis can be subtle initially, but cats frequently will urinate outside of their litter box when suffering this painful condition because they begin to associate the litter box with those feelings of discomfort.

If your cat is displaying any of these signs, it is important to schedule an exam with your cat's veterinarian as soon as possible to determine and treat the cause of their cystitis:

  • Inappropriate urination outside of the litter box
  • Straining to urinate
  • Blood in urine or near litter box
  • Smaller than average output of urine
  • Frequent urination attempts
  • Vocalizing while urinating

Causes of Bladder Inflammation in Cats

Idiopathic cystitis by definition has no known cause, but there are conditions that felines can have that will cause inflammation of the bladder. Medical conditions such as crystalluria, or the formation of crystals in the urine, as well as environmental factors, can cause cats to experience cystitis.

Causes of feline cystitis can sometimes include:

  • Crystals or stones forming in the urine
  • Bacterial infection
  • Tumors or lesions of the urinary bladder
  • Stress from other cats or environmental alterations
  • Moderate to extreme obesity

Diagnosis of Bladder Inflammation in Cats

Diagnostic imaging is a vital part of determining the potential cause of feline cystitis. Some veterinarians have access to ultrasound machines and can utilize these to study the thickness of the bladder walls and see any floating debris in the bladder that would indicate the presence of crystals. Masses on the bladder wall will also be visible with ultrasound technology. Radiology may also be used to determine if there is a stone present in the bladder. If a stone is the cause of the cystitis, it will need to be surgically removed as soon as possible to alleviate the inflammation and prevent obstruction of the urethra.

If there is a physical cause for your cat's cystitis, the most useful test will be a complete urinalysis. This test studies the chemical and microscopic properties of urine that indicate medical issues; a urinalysis tests for the presence of blood and protein, considers the pH and specific gravity of the urine in relation to the cat's hydration status and microscopically inspects the urine for the existence of crystals, bacteria, and red and white blood cells. If infection is noted, many veterinarians may run a basic blood panel to determine if the infection is affecting the kidneys.

Treatment of Bladder Inflammation in Cats

The treatment of feline cystitis involves relieving the cat's discomfort and treating the underlying cause of the inflammation if there is one. Immediate treatment for cystitis often includes a course of pain medication to reduce the inflammation and keep the cat happy while any potential causes are treated. In addition, efforts should be made to reduce the cat's stress at home.

If the inflammation is caused by an infection, the veterinarian will prescribe a course of antibiotics to treat a general infection. Persistent infections often require a culture and sensitivity test to determine the type of bacteria present and the antibiotic it is sensitive to.

Crystals may need to be handled surgically to prevent obstruction of the urethra, a fatal condition in cats. If the condition is minor at this time, the veterinarian may prescribe a diet designed specifically to dissolve these crystals. Stones must be removed surgically, and a prescription diet may be needed to prevent the reformation of these stones.

Recovery of Bladder Inflammation in Cats

Feline cystitis is often a chronic condition that must be managed effectively. Stress factors in the cat's environment should be limited, and many cats require a prescription diet to prevent medical issues that cause inflammation of the bladder. An ultrasound examination and a urinalysis test should be repeated by the veterinarian with your cat's annual wellness visit to ensure no issues are occurring without the presence of symptoms.

Bladder Inflammation Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Max
domestic short hair
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

Medication Used

Buprenorphine

I just took my cat the vet today the vet said his bladder is enlarged but he took an x ray and theres no obstruction. He But he cant keep his food down so im not gonna feed him tonight and will try again tomoro morning. Also he went pee when he got home so i dont understand hopefully the pain meds help if not hes gonna prescribe antibiotics?

I have a cat that has had blockages and has constant difficulty urinating, no infection, no crystals, etc. His issue is bladder inflammation. Stress makes them create the inflammation themselves, unwittingly of course. He pees very tiny amounts constantly. The best thing I found so far is gabapentin in royal canin s/o canned food - just a bit am and pm. He's a large cat, 16lbs, so about 50mg am and pm really help him. Friskies and some so -called high protein foods can cause trouble. He's on urinary foods only but still has issues. If you syringe feed gabapentin, they usually vomit. Hide it in food. This was better over all the pain meds and urethra relaxers. He also does better confined to a room where it is very quiet. Make sure you feel your cat's bladder area constantly to ensure it is not enlarged. They can die in 24 hours or less from a blockage.

My cat is going through something similar.

Just imagine what your cat is going through pain wise. Have you ever had a bad urinary tract infection? To summarize, it feels like your bladder and urethra a burning 24/7, you lose your appetite because the pain is so immense and when you do eat you throw it up because it just makes you uncomfortable and in more pain.

This is what your cat is going through currently.

My cat was throwing up due to having his medications on an empty stomach. It explicitly says on the bottle to take with food, but when they're not eating, what can you do?

I wish you all the best. Try and focus on making his environment as stress free as possible.hopefully with limited stress, he will start to heal and be in less pain.

Please help me figure out whats going on and why he cant keep his food down and swollen bladder but the x rays were clear

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Spaz
American short haired
15 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Little to no Urine
Loss of Appetite
Urinating In House
Frequent Urination
Blood In Urine
Urination Pain
Irritable
Urinating Outside Litterbox

Medication Used

Prazosin
Buprenorphine

My cat Spaz is 15 years old.

A few weeks after a benign tumor was surgically removed from the side of his neck, he started showing symptoms. It started with him urinating outside of the kitty litter box.
Then, he was very standoff-ish, which is very unusual for him. He lost his appetite after a few days. I knew something was wrong. I watched him try to use the kitty litter box. He strained and little to no urine came out. He was frequently licking his genitals.

At first I thought it was crystals. I worried he had a blockage and I took him to an animal hospital. The vets figured it was a UTI. They gave me the medication with Buprenorphine (To help with pain and immflamation) and Prazosin (To loosen his tight urethra).

The Vet did multiple tests:
Ultra sound: No bladder stones, no crystals, no blockages. Looked inflamed.
Urinary Test: Blood in the urine, extra protein, no infection, ph balance was normal, no crystals.
Blood tests: Kidneys were working fine, everything is fine except for the stress hormones.

The two vets figured that is was inflammation of the bladder or cystitis. This is cause by stress, changes in the home, diet or mix of all three.

Must have been due to the surgery he just went through.

All I can do is change his food so it has more water, to help pass the urine and to give him pain medication so he isn't hurting all the time.

The medication is supposed to be given with food. But its frustrating when he doesn't eat. I tried giving him his medication, but it was too hard on his tummy and he threw it up a few minutes later.

Poor kitty.... I wish there was more I could do to make it go away...:(

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Penny
Exotic short hair
9 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Urinate

Our 9 month old Exotic Shorthair urinated on the bed a few weeks ago. I took him in and they diagnosed him with a uti. Gave antibiotics and anti inflammatory meds by injection. About a week later he still seemed to be straining. I locked him in the laundry so I could see if he urinated. Come morning there was nothing so I took him to the vet again. On the way there he urinated all over the carrier. No blood, no crystals. They recommended meloxicam for a few days. He seemed to recover and then today I noticed him licking himself excessively and straining to urinate once more. He has access to wet food 2x a day, dry 24/7. Several water sources. He will go backtot the vet tomorrow but we feel awful for him.

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Bug
domestic short hair
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Difficult urinating

My 3yo female dsh has a recurring inflammed bladder. Every couple weeks she strains to urinate and when she does it is bloody. She has been on anti inflammatory and anti biotics several times. She is a happy and active cat but requires a lot of attention that i am sometimes unable to give. Her vet is suggesting an antianxiety medication but i am hestitant. Has anyone had success with this?

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Lady Georgianna "Georgie"
Maine Coon
10 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Can this cause partial paralysis of the back legs . Cat has been to the vet twice in the past 2 days is on antibiotics and Anti-inflammatory medication for bladder infection. To the last 48 hours she's having difficulty walking. Her back legs don't seem to work and her back is a bit arched

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
It is possible that Georgie has an abnormal posture due to the discomfort from the bladder infection and is reluctant to walk; bladder infections are not associated with hind limb paralysis. You should keep Georgie rested as best as possible and visit your Veterinarian again (third time) for a check to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jazzy
American Shorthair
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Frequent Urination

My cat has been diagnosed with inflammed bladder. My vet has done an ultrasound and took a sample at the time too. She had no crystals and they didn't find anything else wrong besides the inflammed bladder. She still keeps peeing under my dining room table and on the side of my end table which I put a litter box there and she will pee outside of it. My vet also put her on a urine special diet but if i give her both the wet and dry she gets the runs. I'm at a complete loss of what to do for her.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
Sterile inflammation (no infection present) of the bladder is a difficult condition to treat as the underlying cause is generally unknown; although urinary stones, cancer and other factors may also cause inflammation of the bladder. Typically if no cause is found (no infection, stones/crystals, cancer etc…), the cat is given a higher ratio of wet to dry food and encouraged to increase water consumption; there isn’t they else I can recommend at this time. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Oscar
dsh
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

bladder distension, unable to void

Oscar (neutered male approx. 2 yrs. old) had crystals in his urine. At the vet's a few days ago some crystals came out and his bladder was drained. He was also given a cortisone shot and put on Aventiclav 62.5 mg OD for 10 days. Oscar has since been lethargic, anorexic and unable to empty his bladder (I help empty it by squeezing). I've also started feeding him with a syringe small amounts of baby food chicken puree mixed with a little water just to help nourish him a little as he is not eating anything and has only had small amounts of water. I noticed blood in his urine a couple of weeks ago, which seemed to clear up on its own but then reappeared. I suspect he suffered with bladder distension for several days before I realized that he was not urinating. There is still blood in his urine when I help him to void, the urethra appears unobstructed but he only leaks urine on his own. Will this gradually improve on its own or does he need further attention?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
You should complete the course of antibiotics, but it sounds like either the urethra is inflamed or the bladder sphincter muscles may have trouble relaxing to allow urination; either way it would be good to check back in with your Veterinarian since it isn’t healthy for Oscar if you need to physically expel urine for him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Milo
domestic short hair
2 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Going back and forth from each litterbox

Medication Used

Has been on pain meds the first time

My cat will have a big pee, but then will go back and forth for hours during the day peeing a little bit each time.
He does not have a blockage since we've taken him in before for this but it keeps happening. Why does it do this if he has a good pee already?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
This may just be a behavioural issue where he wants to keep urinating in the litter tray or may be indicative of a urinary tract infection, hormonal condition among other causes; I cannot really give you any concrete answer about a cause in this case. If the issue continues bring it up with your Veterinarian at your next visit. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Keyks
tabby
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Painful Urination
Pain
Peeing in random areas

Medication Used

antibiotics

My cat was in the vet today for an inflamed bladder he got pain med shots and antibiotics also a new food for his urinary infection. Is this something he can die from? Could his bladder explode? And how will I know if he is okay or not?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
In some cases, a severe urinary tract infection may lead to death but you would need to have neglected the problem for a long time; the bladder may rupture in severe cases where the urine is unable to void thereby building pressure in the bladder; generally once treatment has begun, you will notice improvements in urination and less discomfort during urination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ginger
American Shorthair
14 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My cat (14 year old female) has been urinating in places other than her litter box lately. She also goes in the litter box, though. She is acting normally and doesn't seem to be in pain when she urinates at all. I've noticed she pees mostly on my shoes or stuff that gets left on the floor. I've also noticed that she keeps peeing in the same spot, so I figured she just smelled something after I cleaned up. She's definitely acts her age most of the time, has difficulty jumping onto high places, and spends most of her days just lounging around and snuggling. I live in a small apartment and her litter box is just 8 feet from my bedroom, where she spends most of her time.
Is this probably a UTI? Is she just old and doesn't feel like walking the extra few feet to the litter box?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
This could be a medical issue or a behavioural issue, if there has also been an increase in the frequency of urination then a urinary tract infection is a possibility; other issues may be a weak bladder (age related), behaviour, hormonal issues among other causes. Urinalysis would be valuable to determine whether there is an infection/glucose/protein etc… present in the urine which would give an indication to a possible cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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