Cherry Poisoning Average Cost

From 45 quotes ranging from $200 - 1,000

Average Cost

$250

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What is Cherry Poisoning?

Cherry trees are used as ornamental trees or as trees to help break the wind. They are members of the Prunus species, which include the chokecherry, peach, apricot, and the cherry laurel. The toxins of the cherry tree are not found within the actual fruit, but in the leaves and the seeds. Not only do the leaves and seeds of the cherry contain cyanide, a deadly agent, the seeds can cause obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract. Cyanide is a chemical that can prove deadly if ingested. Cyanide can be found in the forms of gas and salt crystals, and both forms are highly toxic. Cyanide is not only found in the seeds of specific fruit, but also in materials that are man-made. Cyanide is a known agent in cigarette smoke, extermination products, and plastic that is burning.

Cherry poisoning in dogs occurs when dogs eat various types of cherries’ leaves and seeds. Cherry seeds contain the chemical cyanide that is highly toxic to dogs.

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Symptoms of Cherry Poisoning in Dogs

Unfortunately, dogs that ingest cherry seeds may collapse and die from the time period of minutes to hours. Symptoms of cherry poisoning include:

  • Bright red mucous membranes
  • Hyperventilation
  • Abnormal heart rate
  • Seizures
  • Convulsions
  • Tremors
  • Collapse
  • Death

Types

Cyanide poisoning can occur not only from ingesting cherries seeds, but also other natural foods. Types of other natural foods that contain this toxic substance are:

  • Fruits with pits (cherries, almonds, peaches)
  • Apples
  • Pears
  • Elderberry
  • Various forms of grass
  • Clover
  • Legumes (vetches)

Causes of Cherry Poisoning in Dogs

The main cause of cherry poisoning in dogs is from the ingestion of the cyanide-containing seeds of the cherry. The hydrogen cyanide produced by the cherry tree is a natural deterrent to protect itself. Causes can include:

  • Natural production of the hydrogen cyanide to protect against herbivores
  • The storage of the cyanide by the tree in an inactive form, waiting to be activated by predator
  • When a leaf is chewed upon by the dog, cyanogenic glycoside immediately combines with an enzyme to activate it, causing the poisonous agent to form
  • Once ingested, cells are not able to use oxygen to convert food to energy, thus causing a form of asphyxiation

Diagnosis of Cherry Poisoning in Dogs

Since cyanide poisoning can be lethal, it is important to get to the veterinarian or emergency veterinarian very quickly. If you know that your dog has consumed cherries it is vital to tell the veterinarian approximately how many were ingested and how much time has passed since he consumed them. The veterinarian may do a urinalysis, blood work, along with a complete examination. The blood work may show the amount of cyanide being above 3 mcg/mL. If this is the case, treatment will need to be started immediately, as this amount can prove lethal. 

If your dog is having severe clinical signs of cyanide poisoning, namely tremors, hyperventilation, convulsions, difficulty breathing, or mucus membranes that are bright red, the veterinarian will need to assess the situation and begin treatment. Diagnostic specimens of the fluid of the stomach will effectively check for HCN. When the veterinarian is collecting food from the stomach by way of trocarization, he will need to wear safety gear and respirator due to the cyanide gas. Using a detection tube may also collect fluid from the stomach.

The physician may also test samples of tissue from the liver and stomach. While the veterinarian is running tests, he may give an antidote along with oxygen therapy. Successful antidote may include sodium thiosulfate or sodium nitrate.

Treatment of Cherry Poisoning in Dogs

Since the bonding of the chemical compound of cyanide must be stopped as soon as possible, treatment will be the top priority at this point. The induction of Fe3 into the dog’s hemoglobin, in addition to IV fluids with nitrates along with amyl nitrates that are inhaled will be a good start towards recovery. 

Inhalation of Nitrates

Amyl nitrate and sodium nitrate are effective antidotes of cyanide poisoning. Many times this is one of the first actions the veterinarian takes when a dog is brought in after ingesting cherries or other toxic fruit seeds. 

Detoxification

Thiocyanate and rhodanese aid in detoxifying dogs that have been poisoned. Either one of these methods of detoxification are given through IV fluids.

Sodium Thiosulfate 

Sodium thiosulfate may be given to the dog orally. Sodium thiosulfate helps halt any more production of cyanide in the dog. Sodium thiosulfate is effective in assisting the cells to convert the cyanide into a specific type that can help the body remove it by way of urination. 

Other Antidotes

There are other antidotes that the veterinarian may use to detoxify cyanide by helping it form another receptor, making it equally. Antidotes are currently being researched for effectiveness and safety.

Recovery of Cherry Poisoning in Dogs

If your dog has consumed cherry seeds and does not have time to get to the veterinarian, the prognosis poor. If your dog is able to receive medical attention in time, the treatment methods are quite effective. It is important to always keep a watchful eye over your dog, especially if he goes outdoors in the midst of cherry trees (or other specific fruit trees).

Once your dog is home from treatment, the veterinarian will provide you with the information you need to take care of your dog effectively. In terms of medications, the medical professional will communicate with you the importance of sticking to a schedule and giving the correct dose. When you are home, it is important to keep an eye on your loved one for any behavioral changes for new symptoms need to be addressed with the physician as soon as possible.

Cherry Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Teeny Marie
dachshund chihuahua mix
17 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No symptoms

My 10.2 Lb. little dog ate a single cherry pit kernel about an hour ago. I gave her as much as I could get her to swallow of a tsp. of 3% hydrogen peroxide about 40 minutes ago. She is not showing any symptoms and is playful. I don't know what else I can do for her. I don't have a vet, because I can't afford one, since I live on a fixed income and use most of it, except for my rent and electricity payments, to buy food for her and me.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

Symptoms of cherry poisoning are not immediate and usually present after 24 hours hours with symptoms of breathing difficulty, bright red gums, dilated pupils and in severe cases death. Mixing some 3% hydrogen peroxide with some wet food usually gets them to gulp it down (although makes a larger mess when it comes up - place her in the bath or in the garden for example). Whilst a single cherry pit may not cause much damage, toxicity levels vary cherry to cherry and Teeny Marie is relatively small. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/cherry/

Hello!
My 2 stone dog has just eaten a cherry seed, she’s showing no signs yet but what would be the best thing to do?? It was only one. Do we take her to vets try make her sick??

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Lexi
Labrador Retriever
1.4 years old
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None

We have a 16 mo. old Lab.
I accidentally dropped a bing cherry pit on the floor. She is so quick that she got it and swallowed it. Lexi weights between 55-60 lbs.
Should I be concerned that she may get poisoned? Do I need to take her to an emergency vet now when she doesn't really have any symptoms?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

Symptoms of cherry poisoning are not immediate and take as long as 24 hours to present due to the type of poisoning; a single cherry pit is unlikely to have an effect in a dog Lexi’s size, but being extra vigilant is important. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/cherry/
www.akc.org/content/health/articles/can-dogs-have-cherries/

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Belle
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
8 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None. Diagnosed during regular check

Medication Used

none

My Cavalier KC Spaniel just ate one cherry stem. She weighs 10lbs and is 8 months old. Should I induce vomiting with hydrogen peroxide or will she be okay? I gave her salami as it has sodium nitrate in it, but am not sure if its enough or whether one stem will do much of anything?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

There is varying opinions in literature regarding cherry stems being poisonous to dogs; in saying that a single cherry stem is not likely to do any harm but if you notice any worrying symptoms visit your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/cherry/

Update: we gave her a small dose (1 tsp/10lbs as noted before) of hydrogen peroxide which seemed to do the trick; she threw up, stem included. Had some water a few minutes after throwing up three times and seems fine now. Will update if necessary but it looks as if all is well now. Thank you for this page and thread! Very helpful

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Bailey Ann
Beagle mix
2 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None

My dog got into the trash and ate cherry seeds this evening while I was out. Yesterday she was having mucus in her poop and throwing up and my husband said she had gotten ahold of cherry seeds in the trash on Sunday. I have been watching her for about 5 hours and haven't given food. She has access to water but won't drink. No symptoms yet. Would they show up by now if she ate a toxic amount?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

The toxicity of each cherry pit varies from pit to pit and the number of pits consumed; if this is becoming a common occurrence it would be best to dispose of the cherry pits elsewhere to prevent Bailey Ann from getting hold of them. I would keep a close eye on her and visit your Veterinarian if you notice any severe symptoms listed on this page. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I was not aware that cherry pits were poisonous to dogs. I fed my dog about 5 whole cherries about an hour ago! It's late and she's asleep. She's also a beagle. I'm so worried I can't fall asleep. What severe symptoms should I look for?

Thank you. She still seems okay as of this morning. We are never bringing cherries in this house agian lol. 2 scares is enough. We are also getting a better trash can.

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Lucky
German shepherd mix
2
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None as of yet

Hi I am Ethan again. You may remember me from a "plum accident" yesterday. I have been observing my dog lucky for a while, and she does not have any symptoms, so should I still go to a doctor, or should I just relax? (PS this happened yesterday)

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

I remember Lucky from yesterday; the effects of any toxins would have taken effect by now if they were going to but Lucky isn’t out of the woods just yet, keep a close eye on her and if you notice any symptoms listed on the page linked below visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.vetary.com/dog/condition/plum-poisoning

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Lucy
Beagle
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None

I was not aware that cherry pits were poisonous to dogs. I fed my dog about 5 whole cherries about an hour ago! It's late and she's asleep. She's also a beagle. I'm so worried I can't fall asleep. What severe symptoms should I look for?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

Symptoms of cherry poisoning usually present after 24 hours hours with symptoms of breathing difficulty, bright red gums, dilated pupils and in severe cases death. Whole pits may pass through without incident but chewed ones may not; it may be best to call the Pet Poison Helpline for more specific information regarding toxicity levels of cherry pits (I have different values from different sources). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/cherry/

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Lucky
German shepherd mix
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Thirsty

OMG My dog just ate a plum core. She chewed on the plum pit and broke into it and started chewing the flesh inside. Right now she has no symptoms, but she is quite thirsty, what should I do?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

If Lucky has consumed a plum pit it would be best to visit your Veterinarian or Emergency Veterinarian immediately for treatment which may include gastric lavage and administration of supportive and symptomatic care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.vetary.com/dog/condition/plum-poisoning

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Whuppy
Brussels griffon
1yr 7months
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

No symptoms as of yet she is up ann

My little Brussels griffon/Japanese chin just ate 2 cherries no symptoms as of yet. I'm in a panic what should I do? Will she be ok? She ate the cherries in their entirety she didn't chew up the Pitt

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

Two cherries shouldn’t cause much harm but it would be best to induce vomiting with 3% hydrogen peroxide if you have it to be on the safe side. Look out for symptoms of poisoning listed on this page and if you have any concerns visit your Veterinarian or Emergency Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bruno
Dachshund
8 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None
no symptoms

My 35 pound standard dachshund just ate a small cherry pit should I be concerned about poisoning?? 8 years old and a little overweight. Right now he's acting normal.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

I wouldn’t be concerned about a single cherry pit, it will probably pass without incident; if you want to be on the side of caution and it has been less than two hours, you could induce vomiting with 3% hydrogen peroxide but Bruno should be OK. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My pug just ate 6 cherries pits she is 3 months old please help

My 48lb pit bull just ate 8 cherry pits; should I induce vomiting, should she go to the vet?

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Hunter
Dachshund
6 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

no symptoms

My 15 lb dachshund swallowed a cherry pit that dropped on the floor. This was about 10 mins ago and has shown no symptoms. Is there any course of action I should take? Is one pit concerning?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

I wouldn’t be concerned about a single cherry pit being consumed; I would just keep an eye on Hunter and if you notice anything different, visit your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

You won't get much help here. :-(

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Rocco
Pittbull mix
3 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None so far

I mistakenly gave my 70 lb pit bull the remains of an average sized nectarine including a pit. Is this enough cyanide to hurt him? He has detoxifies from other mishaps surprisingly well before. This was about 10 minutes ago and he shows no problem. He also chewed the pit three or four times.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

A single nectarine pit (or stone) wouldn’t have enough cyanide to hurt him; however if the pit was swallowed whole, there is a chance that an intestinal blockage may occur. If the pit was chewed up, it should pass without incident although some symptoms of gastric irritation may show. If you have 3% hydrogen peroxide you could try to induce vomiting to be on the safe side. If you have some concerns, visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you very much for your quick response! He's been the same great dog he always is. It's very comforting knowing what I should and shouldn't expect now.

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Bear
Labrador Retriever
7 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Black Diarrhea
Throwing up

My dog ate wild cherries, amount unknown. Could he have eaten enough to kill him? Threw up some and has diarrhea. Still alert and walking around. Now very energetic wants to just lay around.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

Wild cherries (the pits) are poisonous to dogs and the black diarrhoea may be indicative of digested blood in the stool. I do not have any data about quantities consumed in relation to toxicity, the Pet Poison Helpline would have more information for you (at a $59 charge) or visit your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.petpoisonhelpline.com

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Hank
pitbull
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

None

My dog ate a cup of about 20 cherry pits and didn't just swallow them he actually chewed them up. He is about 65 lbs he is not showing any signs of being sick as of now. This happened about 3 hours ago.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations

Twenty cherry pits for a 65lb dog isn’t too concerning if swallowed whole, but chewing them up makes them more dangerous; there is no set number of cherry pits that are toxic because they vary in toxicity from cherry to cherry. It would be best to induce vomiting with 3% hydrogen peroxide and give some activated charcoal if you have it and to visit your Veterinarian, especially if you see his pupils dilate, having breathing difficulties or his gums go bright red. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/cherry/

Do the leaves of tree contain cyanide? My dog eats leaves from ornamental tree that bass pink blossoms in spring but no cherries later It seems he is addicted to leaves as he will not come back in house till he eats his fill He is Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. 10 yrs old weighs 25-29 lb was just checked for heart lung problems negative now but could develop later Thank you for your advice

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