Wag! for Pet Parents

Five starsFive starsFive starsFive starsFive stars

43k+ reviews

Install

pet-parent-illustration

Pet Parent

Find Pet Caregivers on Wag!

Sign up

Already have an account?

Sign in

pet-parent-illustration

Pet Caregiver

Find pet care jobs on Wag!

Approved Caregiver?

Get the app

Fireworks Poisoning in Dogs

Written By Darlene Stott
Published: 06/26/2016Updated: 06/18/2022
Veterinary reviewed by Dr. Linda Simon, MVB MRCVS
Fireworks Poisoning in Dogs - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

What is Fireworks Poisoning?

Fireworks can be very dangerous to the curious or unwary pet. Not only is there a risk of injury or burns from the gunpowder going off, but the ingredients within explosives can also be toxic as well.

Metals such as copper and zinc are often used to create the spectacular colors of fireworks, and can be detrimental to your dog’s health. Ingestion of any amount of explosives should be considered an emergency, so contact your veterinarian immediately if your pet has ingested any part of a firework.

Fireworks Poisoning Average Cost

From 27 quotes ranging from $200 - $800

Average Cost

$350

Wag Compare logo

Get a free pet insurance quote in less than 60 seconds!

Easily compare quotes from the most trusted pet insurance companies in the United States.

Get a quote

background

Symptoms of Fireworks Poisoning in Dogs

Some symptoms of fireworks poisoning, such as burns and vomiting, will most likely occur immediately upon ingestion. Other symptoms, such as jaundice, uncoordinated movement, and diarrhea, may take several hours to present.

Symptoms of fireworks poisoning in dogs include:

Causes of Fireworks Poisoning in Dogs

Some of the toxins that may be present in fireworks include:

  • Aluminum: Adds silver and white colors
  • Barium: Adds green color 
  • Chlorine: Used as oxidizers
  • Copper: Adds blue color
  • Iron: Creates sparks
  • Lithium: Adds red color
  • Magnesium: Adds a brilliant white color
  • Potassium nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate: Common oxidizers
  • Sodium: Adds yellow color
  • Zinc: Used to create smoke effects

Diagnosis of Fireworks Poisoning in Dogs

If you suspect your dog has ingested all or part of any firework, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. Your vet will perform a physical exam and begin supportive care right away. If you have any portion of the firecracker that has not been ingested, bring that with you to the vet as well as any remaining packaging.

The vet will likely pay particular attention to the abdominal area to locate any palpable remnants or blockages. Blood, urine, stool, and vomit may need to be tested to identify the toxins and determine the severity of the condition and the best course of treatment. If a blockage is suspected, x-ray or ultrasound imaging may be recommended.

Treatment of Fireworks Poisoning in Dogs

Treatment will depend on how the fireworks have affected your pet and the amount of time that's passed since ingestion.

If the fireworks were ingested recently, your veterinarian may induce vomiting to prevent future blockages and absorption of any toxins. If it has been longer, a large fibrous or bulky meal, such as sweet potato or pumpkin, may be recommended to help push the toxins through the system with minimal absorption. 

Severe symptoms will require supportive treatment. This may include IV fluids for dehydration and medications prescribed to alleviate specific symptoms. These medications may be given either orally or via injection and could include any combination of gastroprotective, anti-nausea, or pain management medications.

Petted logo

Worried about the cost of treating your pet's symptoms?

Pet Insurance covers the cost of many common pet health conditions. Prepare for the unexpected by getting a quote from top pet insurance providers.

Get a quote

background

Recovery of Fireworks Poisoning in Dogs

Your dog's prognosis will depend on the amount of toxin ingested, the composition of the explosive, and the amount of time between ingestion and treatment.

Keeping your dog in a quiet and calm environment and giving their medication exactly as prescribed will help encourage a speedy recovery.

Medications such as laxatives, stomach protectants, and antacids may be prescribed to combat further symptoms, and your dog will likely need more frequent potty breaks than they normally would. Your vet may also schedule follow-up appointments to monitor your pup for signs of mercury or heavy metal poisoning.

Fireworks poisoning can be expensive to treat. To avoid high vet care expenses, secure pet health insurance today. The sooner you insure your pet, the more protection you’ll have from unexpected vet costs.

Fireworks Poisoning Average Cost

From 27 quotes ranging from $200 - $800

Average Cost

$350

arrow-up-icon

Top

Fireworks Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

dog-breed-icon

Bernese Mountain Dog

dog-name-icon

dog-age-icon

Three Years

thumbs-up-icon

17 found this helpful

thumbs-up-icon

17 found this helpful

My pet has the following symptoms:
None
Cought sniffing and licking a spent firework cardboard a couple inches long found in my yard.(neighbor I guess?) I took away still had grey pepples in it. Do i need to induce vomit

July 30, 2020

Answered by Dr. Michele K. DVM

17 Recommendations

From your description, I would not think that you need to induce vomiting at this point. The spent fireworks are not typically toxic unless a large amount are ingested and it does not sound like that happened. It would be best to monitor your dog closely over the next 24 hours first signs of vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, or loss of appetite, and if any of those happen, it would be best to have him seen by a veterinarian right away. I think, given your description, though, your dog should be okay.

July 30, 2020

Was this question and answer helpful?
dog-breed-icon

Pit Bull/Doberman/Great Pyrenees

dog-name-icon

dog-age-icon

Seven Months

thumbs-up-icon

5 found this helpful

thumbs-up-icon

5 found this helpful

My pet has the following symptoms:
None
Chewed an unused sparkler

July 25, 2020

Answered by Dr. Michele K. DVM

5 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Those can be quite irritating to the GI tract. If you notice any signs of vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy or loss of appetite, it would be best to have your puppy seen by a veterinarian right away for treatment. I hope that all goes well for your pup!

July 25, 2020

Was this question and answer helpful?

Fireworks Poisoning Average Cost

From 27 quotes ranging from $200 - $800

Average Cost

$350

Wag Compare logo

Get a free pet insurance quote in less than 60 seconds!

Easily compare quotes from the most trusted pet insurance companies in the United States.

Get a quote

background
Need pet insurance?
Need pet insurance?

Learn more in the Wag! app

Five starsFive starsFive starsFive starsFive stars

43k+ reviews

Install


© 2024 Wag Labs, Inc. All rights reserved.


© 2024 Wag Labs, Inc. All rights reserved.