Kidney Stones Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $800 - 7,500

Average Cost

$3,500

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What are Kidney Stones?

All dogs are susceptible to developing kidney stones, though some breeds are more susceptible to certain types of stones. Kidney stones can be painful and lead to urinary tract inflammation, infection, tissue damage and possible urinary tract obstruction. Kidney stones, also known as uroliths (or nephroliths), are crystal formations in the kidneys resulting from the concentration of mineral salts in the urine. Stones can also form in the bladder, ureters or urethra. If you suspect your pet is having symptoms of kidney stones, schedule an veterinarian appointment as soon as possible. If you can, collect a sample of urine in a container directly from the stream of urine.

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Symptoms of Kidney Stones in Dogs

Stones may not cause symptoms at all. Symptoms that may be observed are similar to those involved with urinary tract infections and include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Urinating in odd places
  • Licking at genitals
  • Pain during urination
  • Straining to urinate
  • Frequent urination producing only small amounts
  • Recurrent urinary tract infections
  • Abdominal pain
Types

Bladder stones form from the precipitation of mineral salts and can reach 3-4 inches in diameter. The type of salt that the crystal is formed from defines the kidney stone type, though some stones can be formed from more than one type of salt. Struvite and calcium oxalate stones make up approximately 85 percent of canine uroliths. Kidney stones can be made up of several types of minerals, including:

  • Uric acid
  • Calcium oxalate
  • Struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate)
  • Cystine
  • Calcium phosphate

Causes of Kidney Stones in Dogs

The normal urine of a dog is slightly acidic and contains dissolved mineral products. As long as the urine remains dilute and at the correct pH, mineral salts remain in solution. If the pH of the urine becomes too acidic or alkaline or the urine becomes too concentrated, crystals of salt will precipitate out and form stones. The causes of kidney stone formation can include one or more of the following:

  • Increased mineral salt concentration in the urine (can result from diet or urinary tract infection).
  • Increased water reabsorption by the kidneys
  • Changes in urine pH (can result from diet or urinary tract infection)
  • Urinary tract infection – bacteria produce urease, an enzyme that breaks down urea in dog urine resulting in a more alkaline urine pH.
  • Long term use of diuretics
  • Dehydration
  • Genetic predisposition - breeds include (but are not limited to) the bichon fries, lhasa apso, miniature schnauzer, and Yorkshire terrier.

Diagnosis of Kidney Stones in Dogs

If you suspect your pet is having symptoms of kidney stones, visit the veterinarian as soon as possible. If you can, collect a sample of urine in a container directly from the stream of urine. Keep the urine in the refrigerator until your appointment. Samples over 24 hours old may not be useful for analysis. Try to collect a sample first thing in the morning the day of your veterinarian visit.

A history of symptoms will be noted. A complete physical examination can detect an obstructed bladder and/or abdominal pain. The definitive diagnosis of kidney stones is made using abdominal x-ray or ultrasound.

If you are not able to collect a sample of urine from home, the veterinarian can collect one at the clinic. A urinalysis can detect the presence of blood in the urine, abnormal pH and the presence of crystals. A guess as to the type of stone can be made based on microscopic observation of urine, however detecting the true makeup is through submission of a stone or stone fragment to the laboratory for analysis.

Treatment of Kidney Stones in Dogs

Method of treatment will depend on the size, type and location of the stones.

Medications

Medications or supplements can be prescribed to acidify the urine and aid in dissolving the stones. Medications may be prescribed to increase water intake in an attempt to dilute mineral salts in the urine. Antibiotics may be required to prevent urinary tract infection or treat a current infection. Pain medications may be prescribed.

Dietary Adjustment

When risk of urinary tract obstruction is low, and depending on makeup of stones, a specialized diet may be prescribed to increase thirst (dilute the urine) or bring the pH of the urine to a normal level. These diets are normally low in protein, phosphorus and magnesium. A proper diet can result in stone dissolution within 2-12 weeks.

Urohydropropulsion

When the risk of urinary tract obstruction is high (or the pet is already obstructed), and the stones are relatively small, urohydropropulsion may be performed. Under general anesthesia or heavy sedation, a urinary catheter is passed through the urethra and the stones are flushed out with a sterile saline solution.

Surgery

When the risk of urinary tract obstruction is high (or the pet is already obstructed), and the stones are too large for urohydropropulsion, surgery may be required. Surgery may also be necessary if dietary changes are not resolving the stones. Surgery may involve removing a kidney or cleaning stones from the bladder and flushing the bladder and urethra.

ESWL

Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has the advantage of removing stones without invasive surgery. High-energy sound waves break up the stones into small enough pieces to be flushed from the urinary tract.

Recovery of Kidney Stones in Dogs

Follow up appointments for urinalysis and/or abdominal x-rays should be done every 4-6 weeks after treatment initiation to ensure stones are dissolving and new ones are not forming. Pets with recurrent kidney stone issues may need to be examined by x-ray or urinalysis every 3-6 months long-term.

A therapeutic diet may need to be fed for life depending on the stone type and predisposition to urinary tract infections and stone formation. Some urinary diets are not advised for long term use because they are not complete diets. There are other urinary maintenance diets that the pet will need to transition to once the stones are dissolved. Dietary changes are normally very effective in treating genetic predisposition to kidney stones.

Kidney stones tend to recur. Routine monitoring for symptoms of urinary tract infection and kidney stones is essential. Always treat urinary tract infections as soon as you notice symptoms.

Kidney Stones Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Isabella
Standard Schnauzer
age 10 today
Serious condition
2 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

frequent urination with obvious blood
Frequent urination, thrist

My 10 year old Standard Schnauzer has a kidney stone(seen on X-ray) Can an ultrasound exam determine the type of stone? I was told that there is only one type of stone that can not be treated with medication. Is this true? If so I would definitely will have an ultrasound to avoid surgery if possible. My girl is 10 years old today.She is having frequent bloody urination. She currently on an antibiotic and tramadol for pain. [email protected]

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

Ultrasound is another diagnostic test for detecting stones; if you are looking for a specific type of stone, a urinary sediment test would give crystals which may be analysed to determine the type of stone present. Calcium oxalate stones cannot be dissolved medically or with changes in diet and require surgical removal. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Z-RO
Dalmatian
20 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Hello! I'm here down in texas and before the hurricane i noticed my dog wasn't peeing very well. just drips. I took him to the vet the day before the hurricane and they gave me antibiotics considering they couldn't do anything else due to the storm. The vet told me it could be a UTI and he couldn't feel stones because you need an x-ray and his bladder didn't feel big so he was emptying it.
Now it has been about 2 weeks after the storm and i notice he has a small amount of blood in his pee. he is still dribbling and has no appetite. My question is... what should i do? is there any over the counter things i could do? i just changed his food to a Urine health food today. We have no money to spare due to Harvey. Should i wait and see if the food helps? should i buy some cranberry pills to dilute his pee? Please help me. i'm stressing out over this. Should i create a GoFund Me and get a surgery done??

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations
Firstly it would be best to try and narrow down a possible cause as difficulty urinating may be caused by many different causes including infection, urinary stones, trauma, tumours, nerve damage, prostate disorders among others. A relatively simple test which isn’t going to break the bank is urinalysis where dipsticks are used to determine if values are outside of physiological range and microscopic examination of the urine for urinary crystals is performed; depending on the findings, your Veterinarian may be able to recommend medical management or may recommend surgery but at least you would have a better idea before raising funding. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you for your response Doctor. i got the test before the storm and he didn't see anything abnormal that's another reason he said to try the antibiotics. i paid about $65 for the test. is there cheaper then that or is that about average?

Hello doctor, I have a 16 year old cockerspaniel. We found a stone around 1.5 inches in her bladder 3 days back through an X-ray. She had a surgery 6.5 years back for stones but the problem has cropped up again. The vet has advised against surgery because of her age, and our city doesn't have any facility for laser treatment of stones for animals. What would you recommend as the best solution for this?

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Samson
Chorkie
9 Months
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Piddle straining to urinate straining to deficate
Stones on top of pee
Suddenly urinating

Medication Used

none

My chorkie puppy is 9 months old. And weighs 2.8 lbs. Yesterday i noticed piddling in his pen. He has always had dark urine and a problem drinking water. Today he piddled and strained to urinate. His legs also shook. After dinner we noticed a fresh urine spot on my couch with 2 CHIA SEED size black (stones?) On the top of the spot. I saved the stones to bring to the vet. Seeing that he is urinating fine now, my question is. What should i do to keep him urinating ?
Samson is tired but, seems back to his old self. We are getting hit by a hurricane tomorrow so, it is impossible to bring him to an emergency vet this weekend.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations
We cannot be 100% sure on the type of stones until they have been checked by your Veterinarian and urinalysis has been done; during this time until Irma and the aftermath has passed it is important to ensure that Samson remains hydrated and comfortable during this time. When you manage to get to a Veterinarian they will give you dietary recommendations and possibly some supplements to give to Samson to help dissolve and prevent stone (depending on the stones). The link below is a reputable site with useful information which may give you a better idea of the problem. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

Oh, as far as the bladder stones. Seems like that was an isolated problem. Vet took an xray and found nothing. I am monitoring his PH

Samson was neutered last week. Seems his testicles did not drop. And that was the cause of the inflammation of his urethra

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Shadow
Shitzu
14 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Drinks a lot. Pees a lot.

My dog had surgery to remove kidney stones last May. This year the doctor saw 2 stones in his bladder again. His blood work is good and there is no blockage. We just changed his diet as per the vet's instructions, but she is leaning towards surgery again to remove these 2 stones. I am concerned about another surgery at his age and was wondering if I can closely monitor this instead with x-rays, etc.?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1408 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Whether Shadow needs surgery or not depends on the type of stones that were previously removed. It would be best to ask your veterinarian whether surgery or diet will be appropriate for him, as they know what type of stones he had, the details of his lab work, and his physical status at this time. I hope that he is okay.

How long does it typically take a kidney stone to form?

My yorkie was diagnosed with a Struvite stone in the kidney. We tried C/D and W/D and antibiotics. Today's x-ray showed the stone is getting larger. I am told surgery, if possible, is risky and extremely expensive. Trying to research other options. Any other diet suggestions?

Thank you for your help!

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Bud
Dalmatian
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

"Bladder failure"

My Dalmatian has lots of kidney stones. They have damaged his bladder so much he can no longer pee. We may have to put him down. My question is this: would the xrays and ultrasounds have shown us the damaged bladder and saved us a $4000 surgery bill to be told the same thing? Wouldn't something have shown up before the surgery or was the surgery necessary to diagnose this problem? Thank you!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

Urinary stones show up nicely usually on x-ray no matter where they are in the urinary tract; the damage they cause may be difficult to see: on ultrasound you may see some thickening of the bladder but many times a visual inspection during surgery (or necropsy in some cases) is required to assess the extent of the condition. The biggest question is: what is bladder failure to you? A ruptured bladder can be diagnosed with x-ray with contrast media, damage to epithelia or sphincters are more difficult to see unless surgery is performed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.vetsurgerycentral.com/images/urogenital/bladder_stones/fig1.jpg

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Lucas
Chihuahua
6 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

can't pee
Blood in Urine

My question is: How will I know of my dog is recovering from kidney stones? Will I see a difference?
When we went to the vet, the doctor told us he had kidney stones and that one way that could help was the medication and a diet.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

If the blood in the urine and the urination difficulties are caused by stones, you would start to see an easing of symptoms over a week or so; x-rays can be useful diagnostic tools in these cases and you can compare an image before treatment and after treatment. Not all types of stones can be dissolved with medication and dietary changes so that type is important to; some stones need to be surgically removed. Other causes of blood in the urine and urination difficulties are infection, trauma, tumours and poisoning. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Pandora
Mixed
9 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

small amounts of urine
Frequent Urination
Dark Urine

Pandora has never showed signs of pain or discomfort. She has had a couple of UTIs in the past and have been treated for them as them come. Recently the Vet found a mass in her abdomen and an ultrasound was done to determine the significance. Turns out there is a large stone/blockage at the base of her ureter right before the bladder from the right kidney. The mass ended up being her right kidney and we were told that it is expanded and most likely dead/non-functional. Her blood values are completely normal.

We stopped giving her scraps of food but in the long run we like giving her treats now and then such as peanut butter, some fruits (blueberries, apples, bananas), and the occasional (once/year) red meat dinner (no salt or seasoning). How likely is it that her diet was the root cause of the stone and how long has she had the blockage? How long would the stone had to have been there for her kidney to lose all function? How can the vet tell that the kidney is non-functional based on an ultrasound alone? What are some good 'human' foods or fresh foods that we can give her for meals/treats? I don't want to just give her kibble everyday with no other food type.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

Dogs can lose up to 75% of their kidney function before biochemistry values are affected. If the ureter has been affected, it is possible that hydronephrosis has affected the kidney which looks like a lot of empty space inside the kidney (google hydronephrosis photos). Whilst kidney function is still overall normal from a physiological point of view, moving to a renal diet would be a wise move so you don’t stress the remaining kidney. There are commercially produced treats which are made specifically for dogs with kidney disease (you may need to buy online), otherwise a bit of carrot or other vegetable would be OK. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Gizmo
pomeranian cross
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Urinate
goose noise coughing
Frequent urinating, even through the night

Hi, I don't know if this is kidney related, my dog has a appointment with the vet in couple of days but I was wondering if you might have an idea as to what I may be dealing with. My dog is 14 yrs old pomeranian mix. He has been making a goose sound for the past few months like he's coughing. Also the past month he's been urinating everywhere. I have to keep him in the bathroom at nigh so he doesn't damage my floors. He keeps asking for the door two minutes after I just put him outside. He seems to be straining to urinate when he is outside, sometimes nothing comes out at all and when he does urinate it's always in little piddle like amounts. Any ideas? I'd hate to have to put him down....

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

It sounds like two separate conditions; a goose honk is suggestive of tracheal collapse which is common in small breed dogs and urination difficulties may be caused by infection, tumours and urinary stones. Your Veterinarian will probably run some urinary tests and x-rays to see the cause of the urinary trouble and the cough; it may be a case of simple treatment with antibiotics or may require dietary management and supplements. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cooper
Pomeranian
7 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None

I have a pomeranian that had an xray done that showed kidney stones. He was given antibiotics, pain meds. How will i know that he has passed or is passing them?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

Kidney stones can be quite painful when passed, the best way to determine if they have passed is to have another x-ray done. In addition to pain medication and antibiotics, dietary management should be considered too possibly along with supplements depending on the type of stones present. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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tinky
Shitzu pekignese
7 Years
Moderate condition
-1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

back pain

my dog has a pinched nerve in her back and is walking alittle better then the vet said she has a kidney stones any way how much it would be

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

Prices vary widely depending on your location, preoperative tests (blood work in a dog over seven), postoperative care, further analysis on the stone(s) removed and dietary management etc… To remove the bladder stones, prices between $700 - $2,000 are possible; again depending on your location. Your Veterinarian would be able to quote you better. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Dolce
Maltese
7 Years
Serious condition
2 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Frequent Urination

Hi, I have a 7 year old male Maltese who was diagnosed with more than 20 stones blocking his urethra. The vet wants to make an additional hole for him to pee and remove the stones that way. He shows no other signs, just frequent urination. My dog also has elevated calcium levels but has a normal chest and abdominal x-ray. Can this be attributed to the stones and am I able to avoid surgery and just have medication/diet?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations
With some cases of urinary stones, dietary changes and some supplements may be enough to manage the condition either alone or with surgery to remove the stones from the bladder which may include propulsion of the stones back into the bladder for removal. Twenty stones in the urethra are too many to generally manage in a normal way, but each case is different; a perineal urethrostomy is normally then performed to remove any stones and to allow a new opening to be created for urination. No two cases are the same and if you are concerned about the surgery, get a second opinion from another Veterinarian in your area; don’t leave it too long as this is a painful condition and may lead to rupture of the bladder. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/treatment/perineal-urethrostomy

Thank you! They ended performing the urethrostomy and so far he is reacting well. Now they want to test his parathyroid hormone levels to see if this is the cause. I thought stones were common in toy dogs.

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Tiger
Mixed
11 Years
Moderate condition
3 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

He is leaking urine

Hello, my dog just had a kidney stone removal surgery, but he is leaking small amounts of urine all over the ground. This happens while he is standing and laying down. Is this normal? They said the stone was to big and they did surgery right away. Did they do something wrong if not normal?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

A little bit of urinary incontinence may occur after anaesthesia, the surgery to remove a kidney or bladder stone shouldn’t have a direct effect on the sphincter muscles or urethra. Give it a day or so, if the incontinence continues, visit your Veterinarian for a checkup. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a mini Australian Shepherd named Tucker. He is almost two years old and is deaf, doesn’t have a iris in one eye and just had a kidney stone removed. It was a calcium oxalate stone. He recently had surgery the first week of January. Since his surgery he has continued to lick at the incision (other dogs are even constantly attracted to it). The incision looks great and is a very minimal scar. He also has still been straining when urinating. It takes him awhile to pee and sometimes he will even stand there like he’s peeing when he’s not. Or sometimes he dribbles. He has been to the vet twice since and she checked him with a catheter both times. She said everything looks good and that his urine sample came back with no crystals but that he still has a bacterial infection which he had before surgery because of the stones. He has been on antibiotics for 5 weeks now and nothing has changed. Now she put him on a new medicine for sphincter muscles. Have you ever seen or heard anything like this happening before? Tucker is a very happy and playful dog. I’m just worried about him and don’t know what else to do. He’s just not getting better

Thank you, but it has been weeks and he hasn't stopped, now it's worse because he doesn't only leak he pees like If he has no control of it. We went to the vet but they told us to keep waiting.

Hi tiger owner,
I'm having the same issue as u. My dog leaks blood all day long, n he scream out after he pee. Please let know if something is wrong with ur experience

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Bentley
Shih Tzu
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Positive radiographs

My dog is one year post-cystotomy for removal of calcium oxalate bladder stones. Today in follow up radiographs, a new diagnosis of kidney stones was made. Comparing the radiographs from last year to today there were no calcifications notes in the kidneys. My dog is on a strict Urinary SO diet only. He is currently asymptomatic, with no grossly obvious abnormalities. My question is what are treatment options for kidney stones? Is extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) a reasonable treatment option?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations
Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a common procedure in human medicine but it isn’t so common in veterinary medicine with only a few specialist centres and veterinary schools having the equipment to do so; each case is evaluated individually and it is down to the Veterinarian whether Bentley is a good candidate for the procedure or not. You should discuss with your Veterinarian about this and whether there are any practices which offer this in your area. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Max
Miniature Schnauzer
15 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

cant see or hear very well
Legs shaking
Dark stools
Frequent Urination

Hi, my mini-schnauzer was diagnosed with having 2 large kidney stones, but no uti. The doctor recommended either surgery or a dietary change to try to dissolve the stones. The problem is he also has a heart murmur and he is 15 years old. Surgery is very expensive and he may not recover well or at all. We put him on the food and she gave him pain meds. She said I would need to bring him back every couple of weeks and at $200 per visit, we just can't afford that. The other option is humane euthination because of his age. :( Thoughts?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

Treatment of kidney stones can be a challenging and life-long process (to prevent recurrence); depending on the type of stone formed dietary management, supplements (to increase or decrease urinary pH) and surgery are options for treatment. In certain types of stones, supplementation to the diet of acetohydroxamic acid (decrease pH) or potassium citrate (increase pH) can be useful. Importantly cut out all human food (table scraps etc…) and find a commercial urinary diet (like Hills) to ensure that Max has a balanced diet as well as addressing the need for dietary change. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Shamus
Olde English Bulldogge
4 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

I have an English bulldog who had emergency surgery in Charlotte for kidney stones in February. He had 20 stones--5 the size of marbles and 15 the size of bb's. I have been returning when required for monitoring. Six weeks after his surgery his diet was switched to U/D for the treatment of future stones. He had developed 3 tiny stones in the time period, but the formation of crystals in his urine stopped since being on the new food. He gets NO human food anymore. I found a vet closer to home and he x-rayed Shamus yesterday and found two stones. His recommendation was to have them removed. I thought it was good news that one was gone. The stones are too large to pass. I am doing everything I am told to do. Any thoughts?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

It looks like a significant improvement since his surgery in February. In cases like this, dietary management is the most important aspect of treatment to prevent stone formation and it seems like you managed to tackle the biggest problem most owners have; cutting out scraps and other types of human food. Depending on the type of stones, it may be possible to dissolve the stones by increasing the acidity of the urine, but surgery is probably the best option. Regular checks are still important to check for recurrence. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Aggie
Beagle
16 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Blood In Urine

Medication Used

none

My 16 year old beagle has some incontinence issues so we keep pee pads on the floor for her. I came home yesterday to see them full of bloody urine. She also vomited. Today the pee pads show fairly clear urine but some have small blobs of blood, or bloody tissue. She vomited again today. She has been eating and drinking normally. She is deaf, going blind and appears to have some dementia and weakening muscles. We would likely choose not to treat anything serious at her age. Is it possible this is minor?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations
There are a few different causes for blood in the urine which may include infections, urinary stones, bladder cancer (transitional cell carcinoma), trauma, reproductive tract bleed (especially if she is intact), poisoning among other issues; you should speak with your Veterinarian for an examination just to determine what the specific cause is so that any care whether it is curative or palliative can be directed appropriately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Einstein
Maltese
9 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Urinate
Straining to Defecate

Medication Used

meloxicam 1.5 mg

My 9 year old Maltese had bladder stone removal surgery 2 weeks ago. He's able to get a good stream however right afterwards he still shows sensation to go again and will strain to urinate even though he has just peed. Sometimes a couple drops will come out after he has been straining. He's currently on meloxicam, is this medication helpful in case he still has inflammation? And is it normal that he is still straining? I will be getting X-rays done again in a couple of days to make sure all stones were removed. But I am also wondering if it is too soon to do follow up X-rays? He's also having difficulty defecating the surgeon said it might be from the irritation He's having to urinate. Is that normal?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2995 Recommendations

Two weeks after surgery for bladder stone removal we would expect that he would be urinating better which it sounds like he is from his solid stream of urine; but inflammation from irritation from the stones and crystals may take longer to go down. Einstein is on meloxicam which is an antiinflammatory which is a good treatment and I wouldn’t recommend anything different at this point apart from (depending on the type of stones) dietary management and supplements to help reduce future stone formation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

I have a mini Australian Shepherd named tucker. I absolutely love him to death but he is very high maintenance. He will be two in April. He is deaf, doesn’t have a iris in his left eye and just had a calcium oxalate stone removed the first week of January. Since his surgery he is constantly licking at his incision (other dogs are attracted to it as well) and is still straining when he pees. It takes him a very long time to go. Sometimes he stands there like he’s going when he’s not or he will dribble. I have taken him to his vet twice since his surgery and she checked him with a catheter both times and said everything looked good that he could still just be sore. The first time his urinalysis came back clear and the second time which was a week after, it came back with blood in his urine and a bacterial infection. He had two uti’s before his surgery and was on antibiotics for it. He has now been on antibiotics and medicine for his sphincter muscles (which she said it could possibly be from) for 5 weeks now and no difference. I am frustrated and do not know what to do at this point. Have you ever seen or heard anything like this happening? Please help! Also, as far as treats what is he able to have that won’t effect or cause the possibility of more kidney stones?

Would it be too soon to get X-rays done and make sure everything is healing properly and no stones were left? Also is the problem he's having with defecating related to the irritation? He wasn't having a problem with that before the surgery.

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Bradey
Shih Tzu
3 Years
Fair
Has Symptoms
Kidney Stones
Hello. My pet is diagnosed with kidney stones and are under medication treatment since last week. After 1 week they instructed us to re-visit them again, so we did re-visit this week. After that, they checked my dog and said the meds "seems" to be working and we have to bring my dog for check-up again next week. I feel I am being cheated by my vet who, I think, just needs business rather than care of my dog's health. Please advice whether this is a normal practice of vets. Will appreciate your help.