Complete Lung Lobectomy in Dogs

Complete Lung Lobectomy in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention
Complete Lung Lobectomy in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention

What is Complete Lung Lobectomy?

A lung is divided into several 'lobes', which are structures designed to help maximize the surface area of the organ (which allows the animal to get more oxygen into their bloodstream per breath) whilst also allowing maximum flexibility for expanding and contracting during the process of breathing. However, when a lung becomes too badly diseased or damaged, it may be necessary for the worst-affected lobe to be entirely removed - a process referred to as a 'lobectomy'. There are several conditions that may prompt a vet to remove a lobe of the lung, though the procedure is generally regarded as a last resort after other methods of treatment have either failed or been discounted.

Complete Lung Lobectomy Procedure in Dogs

In preparation for the lobectomy, the vet will comprehensively map the interior of the dog's chest using x-rays and ultrasounds, to make sure they cut through the lung as precisely as possible and remove all the damaged tissue. Prior to the procedure, the dog will be placed under general anesthetic and have an area of their chest shaved and cleaned where the incision will be. The most common form of lobectomy involves making an incision on the flank of the animal between two ribs. The ribs are then moved further apart and the surgeon operates through the resulting hole. The lung is cut at the junction between the lobes and the unwanted tissue is extracted through the incision, at which point the lung is cauterized and sewn up, along with the hole in the dog's side. A chest tube may be left implanted in the dog in order to drain any fluid that builds up inside the chest.

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Efficacy of Complete Lung Lobectomy in Dogs

Generally speaking, the removal of a diseased lung lobe will halt the underlying condition in its tracks. Providing that proper aftercare procedures are observed, then there should be no resurgence of infection or debilitation. Although the dog may have a slightly decreased level of cardiovascular capability, they should no longer have difficulties breathing. Whilst there are alternative treatments available for infections and cancers (antibiotics and radiotherapy, respectively) which enjoy relatively high rates of success, they will usually have failed by the time the lobectomy is recommended by the vet.

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Complete Lung Lobectomy Recovery in Dogs

Following surgery, it will be necessary for the dog's owner to administer a regular dosage of painkillers and antibiotics for the duration of the healing process. In most otherwise healthy animals it will take roughly three to four weeks to recover from the surgery, though older and more infirm dogs may need longer to recuperate. The activity levels of the dog should be restricted as much as possible, as this will help lower the possibility of re-opening the incision and will conserve energy during recovery. It will be necessary to visit the vet a few weeks after the procedure in order to have the drainage tube removed from the dog's chest.

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Cost of Complete Lung Lobectomy in Dogs

The price of a complete lung lobectomy for a dog can be especially high due to the intricate nature of the procedure. Most vets will charge anywhere between $2,000 and 3,000 depending on the condition and age of the dog. For this reason, many owners will opt to continue alternative treatment methods such as antibiotics (which will typically cost less than a few hundred dollars) or radiotherapy (which will often run into the high hundreds).

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Dog Complete Lung Lobectomy Considerations

It will be necessary to put the dog under a general anesthetic in order to perform the operation. Due to the already compromised nature of the dog's lungs, this additional stress can sometimes prove dangerous - especially in older animals. It is also possible that the dog could pick up a new infection from the surgical wound, though maintaining a clean living environment and providing a course of antibiotics to the dog can mitigate the risk of this.

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Complete Lung Lobectomy Prevention in Dogs

Many conditions that will eventually require a complete lung lobectomy to be performed are caused by the inhalation of foreign objects and particles. Fungal spores, hostile bacteria and sharp objects that gouge the lining of the lungs are all picked up as the dog goes about its daily routine. In order to lessen the chances of this happening, owners should make sure that their dog's living environment is kept as sanitary as possible. It is also advisable to closely monitor a dog's behavior when outdoors, as this provides a prime opportunity for it to accidentally inhale objects when sniffing around. Unfortunately, most cancers are difficult to predict and prevent. Although, it is possible to detect them in their early stages by taking note of changes in a dog's behavior and body language.

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Complete Lung Lobectomy Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Chiweenie

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11 Years

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0 found helpful

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Has Symptoms

Coughing, Occasional Bloody Mucus Coughed Up

My 11 year old Chiweenie needs a lung lobectomy and one vet said dog's tend to continue living a good quality of life post-surgery. Another said she estimates he will live about a year more post-surgery. My concern is what his lifespan will be and what the consequences of surgery are? I'm willing to pay the $10k for surgery, but am concerned about what comes after surgery and who to believe about how long he may live. He is otherwise a healthy senior dog.

July 17, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I'm sorry that you and your dog are going through this. The prognosis for a lung lobectomy really depends on the cause of the problem to begin with, honestly. For me to comment on this I would need to know a lot more about your dog and the situation If you are not sure of the advice that you are getting, it may be best to get another opinion, and that is a big commitment and knowing what to expect is icritical. I might ask each veterinarian what it is they're basing their decision of post-operative prognosis on, as they are so dramatically different. I hope that you are able to make the right decision for him, and that he is better soon.

July 17, 2020

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Chloe

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Basset Beagle

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13 Years

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1 found helpful

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1 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Non Productive Cough 5-6 Times Day

Our 13 year old Basset Beagle mix was just diagnosed with a primary lung tumor. She also has significant arthritis but doesn’t really show any symptoms of the arthitus except some back leg weakness at the end of the day. (She also had a ruptured vertebrae when she was 8 and had surgery to fix it.) other wise she had been healthy. Her symptoms were a persistent non productive cough (for 3-4 months, not every day, but some days 5-6 times a day) and she isn’t lethargic but def tires out more easily. I am contemplating surgery but haven’t got the call back for on appointment with the oncologist yet. We have so many questions and fears... I have a photo of the X-rays if there is a place I can send them. Our vet said he believes it’s about 4x6cm in her Right Caudle lobe (sry if spelled wrong). I would like to know the normal survival rate for surgery, rate of complications, when the most complications occur (during surgery, during recovery, home after surgery), what the top complications are? How do they check her lympnodes before surgery ? (will it show up in her X-rays or CT).

June 18, 2018

Chloe's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1 Recommendations

The questions that you are asking really vary depending on the surgeon and the type of tumor that Chloe has. That type of surgery does come with risks, as does any surgery, but if you are able to have the mass removed, that will give the best possible outcome for her. They will probably take samples of her lymph nodes before and during surgery to give you a better idea as to whether it has spread, but most primary lung tumors don't tend to metastasize. You will have a much better idea as to what to expect once you have the appointment with the oncologist and they can answer those questions for her specifically. I hope that everything goes well for her!

June 18, 2018

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