Bone Cancer Average Cost

From 12 quotes ranging from $3,000 - 10,000

Average Cost

$6,000

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What is Bone Cancer?

Chondrosarcoma is the second most common type of bone tumor found in dogs, following osteosarcoma. It can affect dogs of all ages, but is most commonly found in older dogs. Larger breeds of dogs are more susceptible to chondrosarcoma, Boxers and German Shepherds having the highest occurrence. Chondrosarcoma can be life threatening, and the rate of survival negatively correlates with the cancer’s progression upon diagnosis.

Chondrosarcoma is a malignant form of bone cancer in dogs characterized by a tumor of neoplastic chondroid and fibrillar matrix forming in cartilage. Chondrosarcomas often develop in the ribs, nasal cavity and pelvis but can metastize, or spread to extraskeletal sites such as the mammary gland, heart, aorta, larynx, trachea, vertebrae and penis.

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Symptoms of Bone Cancer in Dogs

Symptoms vary depending on the site of the tumors and whether they have metastasized, or begun to spread to other parts of the body. Common symptoms include:

  • Limping or lameness (most often the first to manifest)
  • Localized swelling
  • Localized pain
  • Sneezing and difficulty breathing
  • Nasal discharge and/or nosebleeds
  • Bone fracture
  • Weight loss
  • Increased blood calcium levels

Causes of Bone Cancer in Dogs

The precise cause of chondrosarcoma is unknown. Development of tumors may be accompanied by abnormal hormone stimulation and bone cell growth. Body size and genetic factors may play a role, but not enough is known about these factors to identify a cause.

Diagnosis of Bone Cancer in Dogs

To aid the veterinarian in diagnosis, bring your dog in for an examination as soon as you recognize symptoms. Be sure to fully report the nature, onset and progression of your dog’s symptoms. The veterinarian will begin by performing a thorough physical and orthopedic examination of your dog’s hips, legs, shoulders, spine, joints and bones to check for abnormalities. This will be followed by a complete blood count, a biochemistry profile and a urinalysis. The results of these tests will be used solely to discover if you dog has any other health issues that may be causing the symptoms or need to be considered during treatment; if your dog has chondrosarcoma, all results will be within the normal range.

The veterinarian will take tissue samples from lymph nodes in order to analyze for cancerous cells. If nasal chondrosarcoma is suspected, a nasal bacterial culture will be taken and analyzed, as well as a rhinoscopy, or examination of the nasal passages. Further, a combination of x rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, nuclear bone scans, and radiographic scans will be taken in order for the veterinarian to identify and diagnose the type of tumor and its progression. Since it can be difficult to distinguish between osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma and sarcoma in imaging, the best tool for diagnosis will be the biopsy of the cancerous growth for microscopic analysis in the laboratory.

Treatment of Bone Cancer in Dogs

Because chondrosarcoma advances so rapidly, there is only a 10% chance a dog will survive past a year of metastasis. For this reason, getting treatment as soon as possible increases your chance of survival. Be sure to talk with your vet about your dog’s chances of survival and recovery as you will need to make decisions regarding treatment.

If caught before a tumor has metastasized, an operation to remove the tumor or amputate the affected limb will increase your dog’s chances of recovery. In the case of an affected leg, your veterinarian’s physical orthopedic examination of your dog will help determine if there is a chance of living a healthy life with the remaining limbs. If the tumor has metastasized, surgery may still be done, but even if the primary tumor is removed, there is only a 10% chance of survival. Surgery or amputation will likely be an extensive procedure involving a significant period of recovery, and only 2% of dogs are likely to survive two years after surgery.

Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have not proven effective at treating chondrosarcoma, but radiation therapy is still considered an option to prolong life and relieve pain in cases of nasal chondrosarcoma, or in other cases when surgical removal of the tumor is not possible. Anti-inflammatories, pain medication, and sleeping pills may be prescribed to help ease pain, and euthanasia may be considered in cases with poor prognosis and debilitating pain.

Recovery of Bone Cancer in Dogs

If your dog has surgery, limit his activity and provide a comfortable, quiet place to rest during recovery. For some dogs, this may mean confining them to a comfortable crate. Consult your veterinarian regarding a recommendation for your dog to relieve himself. Also consult your veterinarian on food intake during recovery. It is important for recovery that your dog be getting the right amount of food. In a case where your dog cannot eat on her own, you will be advised on how to properly use a feeding tube. Carefully follow your veterinarian’s after care instructions, particularly regards to the site of surgery.

In the case of amputation, follow advice on how and when to reintroduce your pet to activity. Keep in mind that most dogs are able to adapt to the loss of a limb easily.

Your veterinarian will prescribe painkillers to help your pet recover from surgery or to cope with the pain otherwise. Never give your dog a higher dose than prescribed. It’s important to keep track of each time you give your dog a dose of a painkiller in order to avoid overdose.

Bone Cancer Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Chica
Rottweiler
10 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

shoulder pain due to cancer

Medication Used

Tramadol

our Rottie Chica has Chondrosarcoma, our VET MD has her on tramadol 50mg 4 to 5 times a day,, her left shoulder has grown to a little larger than a baseball,, she can put little if any weight on the left leg.. is the pain med's prescribed sufficient ?
we understand she has only weeks or a month. is there a local shot or something we can give her in the shoulder to alleviate the pain?
a cortisone shot maybe ?
she was diagnosed in Dec.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

There are stronger analgesics available but I am legally unable to tell you of any as I haven’t examined Chica; also there are ways in some cases to give local anaesthesia injections to a site but efficacy is short lived. Pain management is a very difficult balance and can be abused like in human medicine. Your Veterinarian would need to be consulted about changing analgesics depending on Chica’s condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

thank you so much Dr Turner, will speak to our Dr and see what she can offer us.

I HAVE MISTAKENLY GAVE YOU THE WRONG CANCER IT'S =====osteosarcoma====
MY APOLOGIZES.
DANIEL

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Rocky
German Shepherd
10 Years and 9 months
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

My GSD has osteosarcoma of the left Tibia. He is 10+ years and not a candidate for amputation due to arthritic hips. We are giving him Tramadol 150mg 3 times a day. He cannot put the leg down on the floor at this point but otherwise seems to be his old self in every other way. How do I know when it is time for him to be euthanized? I am having such a difficult time with the idea of him having more time and me cutting it short for him. Is he suffering? I honestly can't tell if he is. Please help. I have a vet on call to euthanize at my home.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Euthanasia is never an easy decision, people worry about their loved one being in pain and question whether they are prolonging life for the benefit of their pet or their own benefit. Generally as a dog owner, you would know when Rocky is no longer Rocky; behavioural changes, distancing and other changes are usually good indicators to go by. If Rocky is still himself, I would enjoy the remaining time you have together; once you start to notice that he is no longer himself, this is the time when you need to ask yourself if it is time. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hey Rocky's owner. I just wanted to write and say that we are in the same boat with our 11 year old black lab. She's so precious to us and it's been really hard to know what to do. Some moments it seems like she's gonna be fine and other times it seems like she needs to go right away. It's so, so painful.. especially because she still looks so good besides the giant tumor on her shoulder. I don't know what to do either. But, I do have to trust that I will know at some point.. I also am so worried about cutting her life short, but also the anxiety about when it will happen and seeing her sometimes joyful and sometimes suffering deeply every day is kind of killing me. It feels kind of good to know we're not alone.

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Hershey
Labrador
12 Years I months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Wheezing

Medication Used

Tramadol Deramaxx

My 12 year old chocolate lab has bone cancer that was dx'd after a fractured tibia. He has a cast on it and is mobile,eating,drinking, doing his business. He is on tramadol and my vet has made an herbal remedy I'll pick up tomorrow. He has mets to lungs. I've heard that dogs hide their pain well so now I'm conflicted on whether he is truly pain free or if euthanasia is in order? I surely don't want to lose my friend but don't want him suffering in silence! Any advice is greatly appreciated!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Dogs are stoic and usually do not show their suffering until it becomes unbearable for them, they don’t want to look weak in front of their owner; deciding whether to euthanise or not is never easy and it is a question which Veterinarians do not like answering as owners may feel pressured into something they are not ready for, this turns into treating the owner rather than the pet. I always suggest to look for behavioural changes, distancing from loved family members etc… these are usually the tell tale signs. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Skeeter
Mix
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Limb Swelling

Medication Used

Tramadol
Tramadol gabapentin

He was just diagnosed with bone cancer in his back right leg and we have decided against amputation bc he had a terrible accident at 2 that has left him with some hip and back problems. Can I cast he affected leg?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Casting won't help at all with any pain, swelling, or problems from bone cancer, and may cause more complications with his skin and infection. Sadly, there is a natural progression to cancer, and you just need to make sure that he is comfortable. If he needs more pain medication or management, your veterinarian can guide you through that. I hope that he is comfortable.

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Stanley
Boston Terrier
11 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Tumor on Spleen
Lethargy

Our vet recently found a 8cm tumor on our dog’s spleen. Splenectomy was performed several days ago and tumor was removed. Some growth into Pancreas but no other noticeable spread. Surgery recovery is going well. Tumor pathology came back with results of “Osteosarcoma” and “Chondrosarcoma”. Is this a confirmed case? Does this imply that he has tumors on other parts of his body (bone/cartilidge) that spread to the spleen? What is the general survival rate for this type of disease? Recommendations on next steps? Not ready to give up on our little buddy yet but want to ensure that he’s not in pain!

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm sorry that Stanley is going through this, but glad that you are committed to doing the best that you can for him. Osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma are unusual cells to find in the spleen, and do typically originate from bone. It would probably be best to consult with an oncologist to find out what this means for him, how to fight it, and what his prognosis is. I hope that he does well.

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