Chocolate Poisoning Average Cost

From 272 quotes ranging from $300 - 6,500

Average Cost

$2,500

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What is Chocolate Poisoning?

Chocolate is derived from the roasted, ground seeds of the cacao tree and contains the methylxanthine theobromine – a chemical similar to caffeine. Theobromine acts as a diuretic, heart stimulant, blood vessel dilator and smooth muscle relaxant in animals and humans. Dogs metabolize theobromine very slowly, thereby enhancing the effects and toxicity to these pets. Chocolate ingestion is one of the most common causes of canine poisoning and can lead to illness and death. Contact a veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has eaten chocolate.Chocolate is toxic as it contains the methylxanthine theobromine. Theobromine is similar to caffeine and is used medicinally as a diuretic, heart stimulant, blood vessel dilator, and a smooth muscle relaxant. Theobromine can be poisonous and result in severe clinical signs, especially if untreated.

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Symptoms of Chocolate Poisoning in Dogs

Symptoms do not appear until 6-12 hours after chocolate ingestion. Symptoms that your pet may have chocolate toxicity include:

  • Vomiting
  • Drooling
  • Diarrhea
  • Extreme thirst
  • Increased urination
  • Hyperactivity
  • Pacing
  • Panting
  • Muscle tremors
  • Seizures

Causes of Chocolate Poisoning in Dogs

The type and amount of chocolate ingested by your pet will determine the level of severity. The more concentrated the level of theobromine in the chocolate, the more toxic the dose.

0.2 ounces of baker’s chocolate is sufficient to cause symptoms of toxicity in a 10-pound dog. 1.6 ounces of milk chocolate is sufficient to cause symptoms of toxicity in a 10-pound dog.

Concentrations of theobromine in various forms of chocolate (generalizations):

  • White chocolate – 1mg/ounce
  • Milk chocolate – 60mg/ounce
  • Semi-sweet chocolate – 260mg/ounce
  • Dark chocolate – 300mg/ounce
  • Baking chocolate – 450mg/ounce
  • Cocoa shell yard mulch – 300-1200mg/ounce

Though white chocolate and milk chocolate have lower levels of theobromine, the sugar and fat content can cause potentially life-threatening pancreatitis.

Theobromine levels and effect on the body:

  • 20mg theobromine per kg body weight - mild gastrointestinal symptoms
  • Greater than 40mg/kg - heart arrhythmias
  • Greater than 60mg/kg – muscle tremors, seizures

Diagnosis of Chocolate Poisoning in Dogs

If you suspect your pet has eaten chocolate, treatment is initiated immediately without waiting for official diagnosis. Try to calculate how much the pet has eaten (how many candy bars, brownies, cake) and note the type and brand of chocolate (have the packaging available if possible). Be sure when scheduling a veterinarian appointment to tell her how much your pet weighs, describe when you think your pet ate the chocolate, how much, and of what type.

If the pet has not eaten a toxic amount of chocolate, a veterinarian may ask you to induce vomiting at home and/or carefully monitor your pet for symptoms over the next 4-6 hours.

If the pet has eaten a potentially toxic amount of chocolate in the last 1-2 hours, your vet will ask you to induce vomiting at home or bring the pet to the clinic to induce vomiting. The goal is to induce vomiting as quickly as possible. After 2 hours, the toxin has already entered the bloodstream and it may be too late for vomiting to aid in treating toxicity.

Your veterinarian will take a thorough history to determine whether your pet has gotten into trash, cocoa shell yard mulch, or other toxic substances or whether another underlying cause of symptoms is present. A complete physical exam will help in diagnosis.

Blood analysis (complete blood cell count and chemistry) and urinalysis will aid in detection of disease or organ failure. Electrocardiography (EKG) can detect heart arrhythmias and abnormalities. Radiographs may aid in ruling out other causes for symptoms.

Treatment of Chocolate Poisoning in Dogs

By the time symptoms of chocolate poisoning appear, supportive therapy is the only treatment. There is no antidote for chocolate toxicity.

Inducing vomiting

Induction of vomiting must be done within 2 hours of chocolate ingestion to be effective. If you are too far from the veterinary clinic, your vet may ask that you induce vomiting at home. Follow the instructions given by your veterinarian carefully. You may want to go outdoors or have a large bowl nearby. By mouth, give your pet one-half tablespoon of 3% hydrogen peroxide (the usual household concentration) for every 10 pounds of body weight. You can use a syringe without a needle, a turkey baster, or a medicine dropper. The pet should vomit within 10 minutes. If the pet does not vomit, call your vet who may suggest bringing it to the clinic or giving additional hydrogen peroxide.

If you decide to take your pet to the clinic to induce vomiting, the veterinarian may use a drug like apomorphine to induce vomiting right away.

Activated charcoal absorption

In cases of chocolate ingestion, the veterinarian will often give a solution of activated charcoal orally to absorb any remaining theobromine from the gastrointestinal tract.

After vomiting induction and/or charcoal treatment, your pet will need to be monitored for symptoms for 4-6 hours. If symptoms occur, supportive therapy will be required to keep your pet safe and stable until toxicity wears off. This can take up to 72 hours.

Supportive therapy

Intravenous fluid administration can help to dilute theobromine levels in the bloodstream and promote excretion. Benzodiazepines (valium) may be administered to control seizures and muscle tremors. Anti-arrhythmic medications can aid in controlling heart arrhythmias.

Recovery of Chocolate Poisoning in Dogs

A pet that has been treated for symptoms of chocolate poisoning will need to be monitored until symptoms reside. Recovery from chocolate toxicity depends on the severity and how soon treatment was administered. Recovery can be complete and prognosis good if caught and treated early (within 2 hours of ingestion).

Chocolate poisoning can be lethal at high doses. Always keep chocolate out of reach of your pet. Hiding chocolate is not sufficient since chocolate has a strong smell and a pet can find it. Keep chocolate where a pet cannot get to it (high up and in a sealed container).

Chocolate Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Cookie
Shorkie Tzu
7 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Sleepy

My dog has opened a bag of brownie during night and probably ate some. I don't think he ate a lot because the bag has just a little bit less and because he didn't ate it all probably because he find it bad at the first place he maybe ate one brownie and then stopped because if he would have liked it he would've complete the bag. Right now after maybe 8 hours
he seems really fine and nothing is wrong for now appart from maybe a slightly faster heartbeat and even that I don't really know because I don't know his normal heartbeat rate. I made him drink water. He is a 7 year old shorkie tzu and is approximately around 13 pound. His heartbeat is approximately 120/minutes. The vet is closed. I have a New Year's Eve party tonight it's okay if I leave him alone? Thanks in advance.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It would be best not to leave him alone if possible. He is past the danger time for chocolate toxicity, but he could still develop GI effects, diarrhea, vomiting, or pancreatitis. If he is not showing any signs of inappetance, vomiting, or diarrhea, he might be okay for a little bit, but I wouldn't leave him alone for hours. Without examining I can't say if he is okay, but those are signs to watch out for that would need veterinary attention. I hope that he is okay!

thanks, i made him drink some water and he just vomited but i think it good.It was a pretty big liquid brownish vomit (so it the choclate because normally the color of his vomit is lighter. Is it good that he vomit one time but if he continues to vomit multiples times i should be concerned. I think the vomit help his tummy.

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Winnie
Dachshun
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

none

Medication Used

Hydrogen Perioxide

My 20 lb. dog got into a chocolate bar. He ate between 2-2.5 ounces of dark chocolate. I induced vomiting within the hour and i believe He emptied his stomach. He has since drank water and eaten, played with his toys, and overall acted normal. Since I got him to throw up almost all of the chocolate, is it safe to assume he's not in danger of any serious complications? He is overall a very healthy and active dog.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Dark chocolate is more poisonous than milk chocolate or white chocolate; it is great that you induced vomiting within an hour but I would recommend giving activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours since there is enterohepatic recirculation. Ensure that Winnie is kept hydrated and it would be worth visiting your Veterinarian to check the heart for arrhythmias. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Nymeria
Husky
4 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Low Energy

My puppy ate chocolate three days ago, she vomit, had extreme thirst, hyper, little shivering, but I made her throw up 3-4 hours after she ate it. She threw up throughout the whole day. Next day she seemed fine, she ate, played, didnt throw up. Also yesterday she was normal so I thought the chocolate left her system by now. But this morning she seems a little sick, she is laying down, sleeping, looking sad when shes awake, she is not the usual hyper, playful pup... Should i be worried, what can i do? Any home remedies i could do for her? Is she safe from the chocolate from 3 days ago?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Chocolate poisoning can cause severe symptoms but is generally recoverable as a condition; the theobromine in chocolate stays in the body as it undergoes enterohepatic recirculation so exposure time can be prolonged. Symptoms generally occur within twelve hours of ingestion and are generally limited to gastrointestinal symptoms, however in severe cases the heart may be affected causing arrhythmias which would need to be managed. You should give activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours until you see no symptoms, but ideally you should check in with your Veterinarian to check the heart. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/pet-safety-tips/is-chocolate-poisonous-to-dogs/ www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

We have a little dog in the Philippines that the owner gave chocolate to. He is now paralysed. What are his chances of regainingthe use of his limbs?

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Emma
Daniff
1 Year
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

i have a greatdane/mastiff she is about 130lbs. she got into a half of 'Entenmann's: Frosted Devil's Food'i think they were double chocolate, when we went to go to the store and she isnt vomiting but she has diarrhea terribly for the last 2 days. i didnt realize she had eaten them till wewere trying to figure out why she was pooping so much. is there anything i can do to help her now?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
After two hours after consumption inducing vomiting is ineffective and after two or three days the administration of and activated charcoal is not productive either; in this case if you are suspecting that Emma consumed a large quantity of chocolate, you should ensure that she is at least hydrated and check her heart rate as chocolate poisoning can cause heart irregularities. If you are concerned or there is no change in her condition you should visit your Veterinarian regardless. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Odin
Australian Shepherd
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Energetic

My Aussie Shepherd (Odin) are an unknown amount of brownie after I left for practice. When I returned , I found the brownie missing (one piece in heart shaped fashion a little larger then my hand) and a couple of smaller pieces gone as well. My dad and I tried to induce vomiting with hydrogen peroxide but she did not puke. She is still very active and playful but it has not been the 6-12 hours yet. Are there any signs I need to look for in particular? Is it possible that the chocolate will pass without causing much harm?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. That amount of chocolate will most likely not cause toxic signs for Odin, but may cause GI upset. If she starts vomiting or having diarrhea, or is lethargic, she should be seen by a veterinarian for evaluation and supportive care.

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Bailey
Basset Hound
5 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Sleepy

My 5 month old basset hound that weighs 25 lbs. ate a piece of fudge (2-3 oz) 4 hours ago, and he does not have ANY of the symptoms that comes after eating chocolate.
I called the 24 hr vet clinic but they couldn't give me any definite answer weather my dog was poisoned or not. They just said I can either come to have him checked out since chocolate is toxic, or I can keep monitoring him.
Since I believe fudge is more butter, milk and sugar than chocolate, I will keep monitoring him. There is just not much information on the internet about fudge consumption, just chocolate or brownies.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
If the fudge did not have a high cocoa content, Bailey is less in danger of chocolate toxicity as he is from GI upset from the fudge. It would be a good idea to monitor him for the next 24 hours for any signs of vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy or loss of appetite, and have him seen by a veterinarian if any of those signs occur.

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Minnie
Labrador Springer Spaniel Mix
3 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

My roommate left out three chocolate cookies (They are chocolate cookies with white chocolate chips) and my 40 pound lab spaniel got to them. I had noticed about an hour or so after that she had diarrhea, but didn't think too much of it as I didn't know about the cookies. It's now 7 hours later and I just found out that she had eaten the chocolate. Is there anything I can do at this point? I live in a really small town in the middle of nowhere so my vet is more than 2 hours away..

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Theobromine is absorbed slowly and undergoes enterohepatic recirculation so you should give activated charcoal every eight hours up to 48 hours after ingestion; you should also ensure that Minnie is kept hydrated. Monitor for symptoms, however whilst white chocolate has trace amounts of theobromine the remaining chocolate (milk or dark) could still be a problem. I would recommend visiting a Veterinarian regardless of distance if you have concerns or contact the Pet Poison Helpline. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com

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Teddy
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
1 Year
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Breathing Difficulties
Shaking

My 1 and a half year old dog ate a segment of a milk chocolate kit kat bar. We called the vet within 5 minutes and were told he would probably be ok so we have just been sitting with him for 10 hours, but he seems to be shaking [not having a seizure] and having strained breaths.It is 11:20 pm so I don't know what I should do.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
There actually is not very much chocolate in a Kit Kat bar, and Teddy should not be having signs of chocolate toxicity. If he is having problems breathing, he should be seen at an emergency clinic, as that may be unrelated. If he is generally doing well and is comfortable, you may want to have him seen in the morning if he is continuing to display these behaviors.

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Chewy
Shih Tzu
6 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No symptom

My 6 month old shih-tzu,Chewy ate about 2oz of milk chocolate. It's been about 2 hours. There is no diarrhea or vomitting. His poo is normal. We just gave him charcoal. The vets are closed. What should I do? He seems normal

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
If Chewy weighs over 6 pounds, he will likely have a mild reaction to the chocolate, with possible vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, elevated heart rate, and increased urination. If he weighs less than 6 pounds, he may have a more severe reaction and should be taken to your nearest emergency clinic. I hope that he is okay!

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Jack
Mutt
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

None noted. Sleeping

My 35 lb male dog ate dark chocolate but not sure when and how much this evening. My daughter found the wrapper. So far no symptoms. What do I do. He is resting comfortably. No signs of vomiting or diarrhea. Eating ok.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Symptoms of chocolate poisoning may take up to twelve hours to present; you should induce vomiting with 3% hydrogen peroxide and administer activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours. If symptoms present, medical stabilisation may be required so it would be best to visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian for supportive care (fluids etc…) or call the Pet Poison Helpline. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/ www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

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Izzy
cockapoo
2 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Normal
Social

My cockapoo dog she’s 2 years old got into my brothers room and ate brownie. I can’t see any symptoms as she normally quite social and happy as she is now but it hasn’t been long since ingestion, no hydrogen peroxide in house or activated charcoal. It is also 2am so no vets nearby are open. What shall I do? Was advised to watch her by emergency clinic but no signs visable and as is 2am I can’t physically stay awake much longer.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
If you have an emergency clinic near you, it would be best to take her there to have them induce vomiting. If you don't have access to a veterinarian or hydrogen peroxide, you will need to continue to monitor her for tremors, rapid heart rate or rapid breathing, or vomiting or diarrhea.

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Molly
Mixed
2 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None really
Trouble sitting

My dog ate some chocolate about 24 hours ago. She's had no symptoms and has her bowel movements were solid both times today, except the last time had Peanuts in it. The only thing different with her is that she has trouble sitting down. She starts to and seems to have trouble until she does it slowly. Her behavior otherwise has been normal. She may have eaten the wrapper. Should I give her a day or two or take her to the vet immediately?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

The severity of chocolate poisoning is dependent on the amount of theobromine consumed, not necessarily the amount of actual chocolate consumed; milk chocolate has the least amount of theobromine inside where as baking chocolate has the most theobromine (approximately ten times more depending on the brand). If you visited your Veterinarian now, the usual first steps in managing chocolate poisoning (usually within two hours) would be useless as forcing Molly to vomit and administering activated charcoal wouldn’t be effective as theobromine would already be in the blood stream. The symptoms of chocolate poisoning may take between 4 and 24 hours to appear; there is no cure and treatment is supportive and symptomatic. Please visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kira
Siberian Husky
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting
Shaking

My 12 year old Siberian Husky consumed a ferrero rocher 24 hours ago, this morning I woke to vomit, pooh and urine and she's today been very lethargic, shaky and struggling to lay down. Once she's laid down she's not keen to get back up, I've just attempted to walk her(to try and get her moving) but she didn't want to walk more than 100 yards. She's drinking lots of water.
She's consumed chocolate before but never had this reaction, I'm worried, will this pass or shall I get her to a vets ?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your question. I'm not sure if she is having these GI effects becuase of the chocolate, or otherwise, but it does sound like she needs to be seen by a veteirnarian to stop these signs. Whether the chocolate is causing her signs, or if her stomach is upset by the candy, either way, she should be seen. I hope that she is okay.

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Rex
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
5 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My dog rex weighs justt under 25kg ate an easter egg yesterday his poo is normal but just now 2 nights after he ate the easter egg he was just sick a little bit any advice please

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
There has been a long period since ingestion, so the normal steps to take like inducing vomiting and giving activated charcoal wouldn’t be effective here; you could give some famotidine at 0.25mg/lb to help calm the stomach but I would recommend that you visit your Veterinarian for an examination since chocolate poisoning may cause issues with the heart, tremors or seizures in some cases when large quantities are consumed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/pet-safety-tips/is-chocolate-poisonous-to-dogs/ www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

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Maddie
Chihuahua terrier
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Vomitting & Thirsty

Our dog threw up and we found out it was from eating chocolate. We have no idea how much. She's thrown up 5 times so far. The first 3 were chunky and looked like melted chocolate. The last 2 were watery. She's very thirsty. No other signs.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
It is good that Maddie kept vomiting and hopefully all the chocolate was brought up with little being absorbed. You should keep Maddie hydrated and give her activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours since the toxins will undergo enterohepatic circulation; you should monitor heart rate but if in doubt visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Fynnigan and Lydia
Dutch Shepherd
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My dogs ate most of a chocolate 1/4 sheet cake with butter cream frosting from Wal-Mart about 2 1/2 hours ago. They are laying down I their kennel and don't seem to be bothered. Should I induce vomiting at this point?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Symptoms of chocolate poisoning may take as long as 24 hours to present; I would expect with the buttercream that vomiting should occur due to irritation. Inducing vomiting will help along with giving activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours; if the cake was particularly chocolate laden it would be best to visit your Veterinarian for supportive and symptomatic care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

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Honey, Boo, Jack
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
4 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Active
Lazy
Sniff
Social

I have dogs, 3 small ones and 3 bigger ones. There was a Valentine chocolate box on the table and one of the dogs got into it. But I don't know which one got into it. There were 13 chocolates in the box. I also don't know when it got into. It has been only a couple of hours since the suspected time for one of the big dogs to have gotten it. But it might of have been gotten into last night for the small dogs.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Signs of chocolate toxicity include tremors, increased heart rate, dilated pupils, anxiety or depression, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and death. If any of the 6 dogs are showing any signs of having eaten the chocolate, it would be best to have them seen by a veterinarian immediately. Without knowing who ate the chocolate, or what kind of chocolate they ate, it is hard to know if there will be a problem. I hope that everyone does well.

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Zeus
Chocolate lab
9 months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

no energy
Vomiting
Won't eat

My 9 month old choc lab ate 4 small chocolate chip cookies around 2pm Saturday. By 11 pm he was vomitting. Today is Monday and he hasn't vomitted since 1 am but he hasn't eaten, isn't at all playful, looks very sad, and isn't himself at all. He's usually very hyper and will eat anything I offer him with tons of enthusiasm. He just seems really sick but hasn't had any other symptoms other than what I've described. I plan to take him to the vet in the morning if he's not better, but was wondering if realistically they'd be able to do much. He's still drinking a normal amount.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Whilst chocolate is the most known poisonous substance for dogs, it normally isn’t fatal but may cause heart arrhythmias which in some instances may be fatal; other issues may be neurological symptoms or pancreatitis. It would be best for you to visit your Veterinarian for an examination as soon as possible for an examination and so that any supportive or symptomatic care can be administered. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Oliver
Bichon Frise
6 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lack of thirst
Sleepiness

Medication Used

Activated charcoal
Vomiting induced
No current meds
Spent night at vet

When is a dog out of the woods after eating chocolate?

My 15 lb bichon drank about 4 to 6 oz of a sipping chocolate that a neighbor left on the floor two nights ago.

We were at the vet literally 20 min after it happened. Vomiting was induced and he was also given charcoal and IV fluids. He stayed the night and I picked him up yesterday morning, but he doesn't quite seem himself yet.

He isn't drinking much (could that be due to IV the other day?), but is eating. He has energy to play with "friends," but seems to spend more time than usual sleeping. But, I'm also scared by the whole experience and so may be imagining the sleepiness.

Should he be out of danger by this point?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
It seems like Oliver received prompt treatment for the ingestion of sipping chocolate and only a small amount of theobromine would have been absorbed; most likely Oliver is just a bit groggy from the vomiting and is probably sufficiently hydrated after the intravenous fluids. If you have concerns, you should visit your Veterinarian but otherwise keep an eye on him Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lily
Bichon Frise
5 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Increased Heart Rate

My dog ate chocolate. Was vomiting and drinking lots and lots of water. Went to vets and they kept her on drip for a while with charcoal. Sent home couple hours after with two more doses of charcoal. My pooch seems ok other than gurgly funny, dry nose and heart rate quicker than normal. Will she be ok....worried about her heart. She's currently asleep next to me but can't stop looking at her.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I feel fairly sure that your veteirnarian wouldn't have sent Lily home if she wasn't past the point of worry. Since I cannot examine her, if you are still worried, it would be very reasonable to call your veterinarian to ask any other questions that you may still have about her condition. I hope that she is okay!

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Benji
Terrier mix
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

My dog is about 12-14lbs and ate 2 chocolate chip cookies while I was out. I am not sure when she ate them but I was out for about 4 hours. He seemed perfectly fine when I came home. I tried to induce vomiting with hydrogen peroxide but all he did was burp. Nothing out of the ordinary, except that he is drinking more water than usual. Should I be worried?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Chocolate poisoning is a concern and it may cause heart arrhythmias; you should give activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours since the by products of chocolate undergo enterohepatic recirculation. Monitor Benji, but it may be good to visit your Veterinarian to be on the safe side due to his small size. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

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Faygo
Husky X
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

He had a dog treat after his walk (ate)
He's breathing normally, no rapid heart
He wont eat any food
His latest bowel movement was solid
Active, wanting to play & pull while walking
No Dehydration

My dog had gotten into a wrapper of Chips Ahoy Chocolate Chip Cookies, and there was some remnants of the chips. I know they use semi-sweet chocolate, and I don't think he ate more than a 2/16ths of the cookie that was in the wrapper. He is 58.6lbs. I am unsure how long it has been since he ate it, as I was not home when it happened. It could've happened between 12pm and 5pm from what I am aware of. I have been watching for signs, but as a worried "fur mother" I need to know more about what to do just incase.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Symptoms of chocolate poisoning usually present within six to twelve hours of ingestion; induction of vomiting with 3% hydrogen peroxide (within three hours of ingestion) followed by activated charcoal, if symptoms of chocolate poisoning present the activated charcoal should be administered every eight to twelve hours. Vomiting, diarrhoea, increased thirst, abdominal pain, heart arrhythmias and neurological symptoms are commonly presented with chocolate poisoning; the amount suspected to have been consumed is small but you should still be vigilant. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

My 1 year old. Doberman ate a brownie he weighs over 100 pounds will he be ok

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Maggie
Mix
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My 15 lb Cocker Spaniel/chihuahua mix got a Fiber One Oat and Chocolate bar anywhere between 11 and 13 hours ago. The bar is made with semi-sweet chocolate and is a total of 1.3 oz. the amount of chocolate in that is less that 1.3oz though. I've been watching her and nothing seems out of the ordinary. Her bowel movement was normal, with the last bit extremely soft this morning. Should I be worried and what should I continue to keep an eye out for?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Chocolate poisoning takes time to affect a dog unless large quantities are consumed causing gastrointestinal upset; symptoms usually present after around ten hours and are usually vomiting, diarrhoea, cardiac arrhythmias and neurological symptoms among other symptoms. There are guidelines on the toxicity of chocolate (see link below) but each dog may vary in sensitivity to theobromine making estimations very vague. I would keep a close eye on Maggie, but if you have any doubts you should visit your Veterinarian; whilst ingestion may not be fatal it will cause her to be sick. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

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Kona
Pitbull/Lab
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargic
Shaking
Throwing up

My dog ate about 20oz of dipping/coating chocolate. Combo of milk and dark about 2 hours ago. She has thrown up at least three times on her own and was given 3/4tsp of activated charcoal about 30 minutes ago. She was having full body tremors off and on for about 15 minutes after giving the charcoal and has now thrown up again (a lot more than what she threw up earlier). She’s sleeping now but lethargic when she’s awake. Should I be concerned still?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
You should continue to be concerned about Kona and you should continue to give activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours (due to enterohepatic recirculation) until we know we are out of the woods; in these cases I always recommend visiting your Veterinarian for an examination in these poisoning episodes especially when symptoms have presented as you have described and that chocolate poisoning may cause heart arrhythmias. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tyson
Rottweiler
5 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Thirsty

My dog just ate an entire box of Entenmenn's chocolate chip cookies. My son ate 2 and my dog must have somehow got to the box and consumed the rest - approx. 330 grams. He ingested them about 20 minutes ago, not yet showing any symptoms. He is a 5 year old Rottweiler and 140 pounds. Being that he is such a big dog, should I be alarmed? Should I bring him dowm to the emergency vet or should I wait and see what his symptoms are? Given his breed and his weight, what symptoms should I be expecting? Thank you soo much.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
By the time I’m answering this question it is too late to induce vomiting but you should give activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours for 72 hours as the toxins will undergo enterohepatic recirculation. Symptoms typically present within twelve hours of ingestion; cardiac arrhythmias and neurological issues are the main concerns; however if all 330g (11oz) of cookies were milk chocolate it wouldn’t be enough to cause a poisoning event in a 140lbs dog. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate www.vetcalculators.com/chocolate.html

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Elsa
Chihuahua
3 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Hives

My 5 pound Chihuahua ate two brownies about 6-7 hours ago she seems fine and is eating and drinking water except she does have bumps all over her skin I don't know if this has anything to do with her eating the brownies should I be worried ?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Symptoms of chocolate poisoning take between four or six hour up to twenty-four hours to present. Whilst the amount of chocolate consumed is small, at five pounds the effects will be greater in a dog Elsa’s size. Whilst most cases of chocolate poisoning result in severe illness, I would strongly recommend visiting a Veterinarian as her size is small; the type of chocolate and the amount consumed will also have a bearing on the overall prognosis. I have provided a few links below for you to have more information as at this time it is too late to induce vomiting. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate
www.petpoisonhelpline.com/pet-safety-tips/is-chocolate-poisonous-to-dogs/

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Payton
Dachshund
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Shaking
Vomiting
Lethargy

Medication Used

Charcoal and hydrogen peroxide

My dog ate an unknown amount of semi sweet morsels. We induced vomiting and gave him activated charcoal. Now he is lethargic and shaking(may be from temperature). He may be running a temperature? Is this normal for recovery or still an from the chocolate?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Inducing vomiting and administering activated charcoal is a good first aid step, administering activated charcoal every four hours will help as theobromine undergoes enterohepatic recycling; fluid therapy is also important and would need to be administered by your Veterinarian. Chocolate poisoning in dogs is common, but if we do not know the quantity consumed we cannot be sure of the overall prognosis and the time before vomiting induced will also have a bearing on prognosis. Fever isn’t usual in dogs with chocolate poisoning, but remember that dogs have a higher physiological temperature than humans. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

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Holly
Chihuahua
11 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My dog went through my trash and found empty Reece cup wrappers, what should I do? Should I be worried since the Reece cup wrappers were in there for a few days?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
If the wrappers were empty, then we wouldn’t be concerned about chocolate poisoning but by the wrappers either causing an obstruction or other issue in the gastrointestinal tract; hopefully the wrapper are small enough to be passed by Holly without incident. We also need to be concerned if Holly consumed anything else from the rubbish bin since that may also pose a poisoning or obstruction risk. You should monitor Holly for the time being but visit your Veterinarian if you have any concerns. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Also, she hasn't vomited or anything yet I'm just worried because of her age and weight.

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Emmett (female)
Dachshund
13 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My 13/14 year old dachshund terrier mix ate a box of Russell Stover chocolates today and has been vomiting throughout the day. The vomit has been mostly clear with a brown tint. The chocolates were variety (coconut center, vanilla creme, etc). She has been drinking water more than usual but hasn’t eaten anything since the chocolates.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
You should give Emmett activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours for up to 72 hours after the consumption of the chocolates since theobromine undergoes enterohepatic circulation. You should monitor Emmett for behavioural changes, but I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian to be on the safe side if none of the chocolates were brought up with vomiting. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Zeus
Husky
2 Years
Fair condition
2 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomited

My Huskamute Zeus ate approximately 20 miniature Resse's peanut butter cups right at 36 hrs ago. He just vomited, but other than that he has seemed to be his usual self. He is 2yrs old and weighs approximately 65-70 pounds. Any advice would be great, thanks for your time.
Sincerely,
Jarrad B.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Poisoning is always a concern, however the amount of Peanut Butter Cups consumed (assuming they are 50% chocolate) most likely would cause gastrointestinal symptoms but little other signs of toxicity in a dog Zeus’ size. I would keep a close eye and give activated charcoal now and in eight hours since theobromine undergoes enterohepatic recirculation; I would also however consult the Pet Poison Helpline as there may be other ingredients, preservatives etc… in the Peanut Butter Cups which may be toxic to dogs. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

*sincere* not dinner lol, auto correct at its best

Thank you so very much for your help and recommendations, I will give him the activated charcoal now and in another 8 hours as well as contact the Pet Poison Helpline. A dinner thank you from my family and I 🙏🏻

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Pebble
Maltese
1 Year
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Hyperactivity

I have two dogs, a 11 lb mixed Pomeranian/Shitzu and a 7lb Maltese. I came home to find a 1oz Balmer Crisp Kringle Chocolate Santa consumed with the wrapper on the floor. I am not sure which dog ate it, or if both consumed it together. I am concerned that because they are both dogs are so small, the chocolate will be extremely toxic for them. I think it's milk chocolate and the candy had "crisp" pieces in it. It's been a few hours and they seem to be behaving normally? Please help!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Symptoms of chocolate poisoning may take six to twelve hours to present, if consumption was within the last two hours you should induce vomiting with 3% hydrogen peroxide and then give activated charcoal; if consumption was longer ago then you should give activated charcoal every eight to twelve hours because of enterohepatic recirculation. You should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian regardless to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/chocolate

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Toby
Beagle
3 Years
Serious
Has Symptoms
Separation Anxiety
Vomiting
Toby, my 3 year old beagle jumped up on the sofa and ate part of a chocolate bar so fast nobody could stop him. At first he seemed fine but after a while I noticed he was drinking more water than he usually did, plus he began pacing and vomiting. Since I knew he ate the chocolate I contacted the vet immediately. They told me to induce vomiting immediately and to rush to the vet office. The vet gave him an exam, blood analysis and urinalysis. I told the vet he had done this before but didn’t eat quite as much chocolate as this time. The vet gave Toby a charcoal solution and an IV to help get it out of his system.