Fainting Average Cost

From 12 quotes ranging from $2,500 - 6,000

Average Cost

$2,800

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What is Fainting?

Fainting or syncope is defined as loss of consciousness accompanied by loss of postural tone for a short time because of a temporarily insufficient supply of oxygen or decreased delivery of essential nutrients (e.g. glucose) to the brain. During a fainting episode of a dog will collapse and the limbs may become stiff or the dog may paddle its legs. The most susceptible breeds are Boxer, Doberman and Great Dane. This syndrome is often associated to cardiac disease therefore; identifying the underlying cause is crucial. Fainting, also called syncope, is a loss of consciousness that is typically due to a lack of normal blood flow to the brain. Fainting in dogs is typically attributed to one of two main problems: neurologic (e.g., brain or spinal cord) or cardiac (e.g., heart arrhythmias, etc.).

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Symptoms of Fainting in Dogs

  • Flaccid and sudden collapse
  • Usually there is no urination or defecation during the episode
  • Dog is unresponsive during the episode
  • Abrupt and complete recovery
  • Pale mucus membranes

Causes of Fainting in Dogs

Most syncopal events in dogs are due to a temporal reduction in brain blood flow. A decrease in cardiac output or less vascular resistance reduces arterial pressure and may result in reduction of cerebral blood flow. Cardiac diseases are related to two-thirds of the syncope episodes seen in dogs and cats.

Neurologic
  • Abnormal brain activity
Cardiac
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Atrioventricular block
  • Ventricular tachycardia
  • Ventricular fibrillation
  • Heart tumors
Others
  • Low concentration of glucose, calcium, sodium in blood
  • Use of diuretics and vasodilator drugs
Characteristics
  • Flaccid and sudden collapse
  • Usually there is no urination or defecation during the episode
  • Dog is unresponsive during the episode
  • Abrupt and complete recovery
  • Pale mucus membranes

Diagnosis of Fainting in Dogs

It is important to provide the veterinarian with as much information about the fainting episode as possible, this will help him/her to distinguish seizures from syncope and to identify the underlying cause. Since most fainting episodes occur in the presence of the dog owner and not of the veterinarian it is important to pay attention to how the dog collapses. Taking a short video, if possible, and showing it to the veterinarian, can be a great way of helping your pet.

Fainting is not a disease but a syndrome; therefore, it is very important to identify what is causing the episodes in order to adequately treat the patient. Diagnosis starts with a through physical examination and gathering of the patient’s clinical history. Owners should inform the veterinarian about any drugs that the patient is taking.

The veterinarian will start with a thorough physical examination to detect any abnormalities, especially in heart function. Meticulous auscultation will allow detection of cardiac disease signs such as a murmur, arrhythmia, pulse deficit or signs of reduced cardiac output such as pale mucous membranes. If there is evidence of cardiovascular disease the following diagnostic test may be needed:

  • An electrocardiogram (ECG) to assess resting heart rate and rhythm
  • Echocardiography to assess cardiac dimensions and function
  • Full haematology and serum biochemistry to assess whether there is evidence of reduced organ perfusion and/or other systemic disease
  • Thoracic radiographs to assess whether there are signs of congestive heart failure

Treatment of Fainting in Dogs

Syncope episodes are temporary and reversible; once the cause of syncope has been identified the veterinarian will recommend an appropriate treatment. For example, if an abnormally low heart rate is detected, the dog may need a permanent pacemaker to stimulate heart function. If the episodes were caused by a given medication, treatment withdraw will probably suffice.

Recovery of Fainting in Dogs

After a fainting episode it is important to detect the cause and to prevent recurrent episodes. It is important to be vigilant of any future episodes and, in such cases, contact your veterinarian immediately. If cardiac insufficiency was the cause, strenuous exercise should be avoided and the veterinarian’s indications should be followed rigorously. In these cases, patients tend to have poor prognosis. Dogs with fainting history will probably need various medical check ups during the year.

Fainting Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Tarah
Shih Tzu
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Fainted and not eating.

Medication Used

Vetmedin and Entyce

My 11 y.o.shih tzu Tarah was skipping meals over a week ago.then 5 days ago Tarah fainted, laying on her side and her paws stiff straight. A minute went by and she was still on the floor.I picked her up and down again she went. I Rushed her to the vet.blood and urine work all normal but the xrays showed the left side of her heart is enlarged and there is an unknown mass on her trechea.the vet gave her meds for her heart. The morning after treatment her nose is dripping lots of water or mucus. But she is NOT eating! After 3 days of no food the vet gave her meds to stimulate her appetite and still nothing. She has been drinking a lot and I do carry her outside to go potty.my other big dog got very excited today and Tarah did too but just for a very short time because she fell on her side again but did not lose consciousness.I've been forse feeding with a siringe and this food for weak puppy/kittens.but still she won't eat on her own. Even the food she loves, she turns her head away. What can I do?I can't bare the thought of losing her, she's my shadow, my baby. One of the vet techs said this is the last thing we can try and if nothing works I need to bring her in again but I'm scared if it's her last visit how can I help her get better And what is really wrong with my Tarah?thank you.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
I'm sorry that that is happening to Tara, that is very sad. Without knowing more about her, it is difficult for me to comment on what might be going on with her, but typically, we need to treat the underlying problem that is causing her to feel like not eating. The mass on her trachea may be the focus of the problem, and an ultrasound or a biopsy may be the next test that she needs. She may need a referral to a cardiologist. Those are options to discuss with your veterinarian, as they can see her and know more about her physical condition. I hope that she is okay.

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Skye
Bichon Frise
14 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Panting

Medication Used

Vetoryl

Our dog had a recent fainting spell last night spell 2 AM which resulted in her sprawled on the floor, stiffened, and having urinated. I rubbed her sides and belly until she was able to stand in about 2 minutes. She fully recovered in about 5 minutes and was able to go outdoor in a few more minutes.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Given Skye's age, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian, as they will be able to assess her health, her neurologic function, and suggest any treatment that she may need. I hope that she is okay.

My 10 year old boy Jeff, just collapsed. He coughed and then fell over onto his side. His whole body went stiff and he urinated. His eyes opened really wide and he was unresponsive for about 30 seconds. I just tried to soothe him. After about 1 minute he got up and went to his bed. I live in a remote area in Mozambique where we don’t have access to veterinary care. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

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BJ
West Highland White Terrier
15 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

weak joints
faint
Dizziness
Dehydrated
Weak Bladder

Medication Used

Gabapentin

Hi, I have a 15 year old dog named BJ whom I had all my life (he will be 16 in a few days) and he's had about 3/4 faint spells in the past week and a half. On the first one, he walked outside and went to the bathroom and went to walk down the sidewalk and stopped like his legs didn't work. He tried to take a step but knew his legs were going to give out. When I picked him up his head went limp and his eyes looked dazed and when I laid him down he peed on himself. A minute later and he was fine. He is a healthy dog besides his hips hurt him because he is old and I give him glucosamine vitamins. His other faint spells are outside (in the 40 degree weather) or even in the house but he tighten up his legs because he knows he can't move a step, he falls over, then after a minute he's fine. He also shakes sometimes and it's uncontrollable. Does that mean anything? I went to the doctor and they prescribed Gabapentin because they said besides the first faint spell he was healthy and everything checked out. I got blood work 6 months ago and it was fine. Should I get another test for his heart? or an x-ray? Also, I went to the vet only after the first episode. Also, he drinks a lot of water after the spells. Thanks!

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
It sounds like something might be going on with BJ that needs more attention. It might be worth having repeat bloodwork since this is a new situation, and an ECG and x-ray will assess his heart function. If those things are normal, the next step might be a referral to a neurologist, to assess his neurologic function. I hope that he is okay.

My 15 year old jack Russell has the exact problem faints but comes around after about 10 senconds .... it only happens when I come home

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Molly
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Fainting

Our dog was recently diagnosed with Vasovagal Syncope and has been prescribed Spironalatone to control it. She had a small episode last night where she fainted for a short period of roughly 15 seconds. Is the Spironalatone supposed to stop this from happening or just manage them so they're not as frequent or as severe?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Spirinolactone is not a cure for vasovagal syncope, but should help in the severity and frequency of the condition. If Molly continues to have the same types of episodes, with no improvement, you should follow up with your veterinarian. I'm not sure how long she has been on the medication, but it should gradually start to improve her situation.

Thank you for your response. It's been less than 3 weeks since she first started Spironalatone. I'm hoping over time her collapses will be less frequent and less severe.

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Victor
Jack Russell Terrier
3
Mild condition
2 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Fainting

Medication Used

none

My three year old JRT has had two fainting episodes in 48 hours, no other symptoms what so ever. I have had him at the vet and all his bloods are good. The 2nd episode, he knew was coming on, both are after excitement ( people coming in unannounced). He ran to his bed with his ears back and then fainted, on his side, and stretched his head back, sat up dazed and after a minute was running around again. My vet says wait and see but wee are concerned. The only other thing I can notice, is that perhaps he is sleeping a little more than usual. Also prior to this I noticed at the park he wasn't socialising with the other dogs as he usually does.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Sometimes in these situations a dog which has some heart defect may get so excited that the heart no longer efficiently pumps blood around the body and the brain gets starved of an adequate oxygen supply for a short period of time causing him to pass out; after passing out the excitement disappears immediately and the heart resumes pumping blood normally. I would recommend an x-ray of the thorax or echocardiography would be better to check how the heart is functioning. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Hugo
Shih Tzu
5 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Collapse

My 5 year old shih tzu woke up this morning and was fine he came out to the kitchen so I could let him go out to go to the bathroom and before I was able to hook him up he collapsed and his eyes shit and his body tense up and then his head tilted back and he gave out like a cry and then his body went like limp only for a second and then he was back to normal and is now fine ?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
It sounds like Hugo may have had a heart episode where there wasn’t enough blood flow to the heart; without an examination I cannot say for sure but it doesn’t sound like a seizure. You should take Hugo to be examined by your Veterinarian for a check of his heart as well as possibly echocardiography and x-rays to check heart health. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cardo
Chowspits
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Fainting

My 1 year old chowspits fainted twice in a day. He just fainted in front of me and head back then urinate himself. I took him to the vet immediately but they just advice me to take my dog in a cold place (because it's warm here. My dog is still not feeling good and he doesnt want to drink water. What should I do? 😭

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Cardo needs a more thorough examination to rule out any heart condition which may cause a reduction in blood flow to the brain and subsequent fainting spell; warm humid weather makes this worse especially if dehydrated because the blood is more viscous. Try to give some water slowly by syringe into the mouth and add some unflavoured Pedialyte too; if this continues you should visit another Veterinarian for a more comprehensive examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Boo
Papillon
12-13
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

collapse/urinating

I have a 12-13 year old male Papillon. He is on and off with his health. He has very bad dental disease, some arthiritis, and a collapsed trachea. However, he is good and sometimes he is more down than most days. Last night i woke up terrified. I heard a loud thump and got up to find him on the floor and in a pool of urine. I was so scared he wasn't completely out but just laying there and I picked him up and he was not able to stand for a couple seconds. Then, he was fine and walking and went back to sleep like nothing happened. He is fine today and normal/happy/eating so I have no idea why that happened! Please give me advice on what you think it may be! A neurological disorder i presume? Note: I give him glucosamine chondroitin tablets daily and have been for months, along with an antacid tablets (believe ranotidine) and have been for years the vet said daily was fine.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
It is difficult to say what exactly causes this episode, it may be that given his age he just got disorientated and fell down. I would keep an eye on Boo for the time being and look out for any odd behaviour or difficulties when standing up; without performing an examination or having more information I really cannot give you much more advice that this. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Rupa
Lhasa Apso
16 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

I have a sweet 16 year old Lhasa Apso. I gave her a bath this morning...and, she was less than happy. She is blind and hard of hearing. She was barking, got very upset and then collapsed. I got her out of the tub, she was limp. Within a few minutes she was up, went to have water and than ate her breakfast. Do you think she fainted because she was over excited?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
There are a few causes for fainting in dogs, but in a dog Rupa’s age I would be concerned about her heart; if she wasn’t best pleased with her bath, her heart rate may have increased which may have caused an arrhythmia which reduced blood flow to the brain. I would try to keep her calm and have your Veterinarian take a look at her to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My 12 year old Chihuahua has collapsed 2 times this week. Just feel over the first time she was very excited playing with her puppy and stopped and fell over to the side. Then today she was going up the stairs walked a bit more stopped and fell over again. She got back up quickly and continued. She has an ear infection, could that be the cause? She is also older and she is losing weight. But she eats regularly and still has much energy. What can I do? Is there anything I can do at home for her?

Thank you so much Dr. Turner. Very kind of you to respond, and so quickly.

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Margarita
Chihuahua
14 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Urination
Collapse
moaning

Medication Used

Vetmedin
Furosemide

My 14 year old chihuahua has congestive heart failure and is on medication. She had a re-check appointment last week and the cardiologist was satisfied with her condition. Since then she has collapsed 2 times. Both times were after giving medication. She falls over, starts moaning, and pees on herself. But does not lose consciousness. Ten minutes later she recovers and is back to looking for treats. Please advise?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
It is possible that Margarita is stressed by the process of receiving her medicines which may cause a lack of blood flow to the brain which could lead her to be weak causing the symptoms you are describing given her current condition. Without watching her and checking her during this event, I cannot say for sure what the cause is but you should bring it up with your Cardiologist. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I was sleeping one morning and I heard my 10 year old chihuahua yelp which had woke me up. Once I looked up he was completely unconscious and urinated all over himself, and was completely limp for about 20 seconds. After that he slowly gained consciousness back and was confused on what happened. He was taken to the vet and and nothing they said really helped. They told us to just watch over him and call if something else happened. I'm worried for my little buddy.

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Ruby
Yorkipoo
15 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

syncope

My beloved Ruby is a female 15 year old Yorkie-Poo with advanced heart disease and has been having episodes of syncope of over a year. We have her on meds and try to keep her as calm as possible but she had an episode today and I noticed that the length of time that she was unconscious was longer than it has been previously. Is this an indication that she is nearing the end? I can't take her back to the vet as it would be too upsetting for her and would likely cause big problems for her. Thank you so much!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

Fainting in older dogs with heart conditions is usually attributable to the heart being unable to pump enough blood to the brain to keep the dog conscious; there are medications which help the contractility of the heart which may be of benefit but this would require a visit to your Veterinarian. Since I haven’t examined Ruby I cannot comment in full, but fainting is a symptom which is to be expected in certain heart conditions. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

These so called doctors act like everyone has $2800 to $6000 to just go give them for a check up much like doctors for people all in it for the all mighty dollar and nothing else than their personal gain. Can't give you any ideas cause there are only and few. And he would lose his living if the public ever found that out. So make sure you take your money and your pet In that order to the local vet

It's really not $2800-6000 just a estimate. The first visit with everything is close to $1200. But that's because the first guess was heart failure. But It can be more then just heart disease. My dog also has pulmonary hypertension as well, medication was also prescribed. Your dog can have a tumor the Vet has to check what the problem is before a complete diagnosis. So let's be real there's no way to tell what the exact problem is until you go to the vet and have test done. Your lucky your even provided with a suggestion online. ✌🏽

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Babygirl
Yorkshire Terrier
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Collapse

My old f. Yorkie is a rescue dog. I've had her at least 10 yrs. She is blind & hard of hearing. She's been eating well, but recently she's fell over two instances, and when l picked her up she was lifeless & limp like a wet noodle. I ran twice to my bed room & have her mouth to mouth bought her back. I'm afraid she MAYBE dying!!?? ;(

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

If Babygirl keeps having these episodes, it may be a case that her heart or another body system is failing; sometimes the heart may not be able to pump a sufficient amount of blood to the brain which causes a dog to faint and go limp and after a short period of time the dog would regain consciousness. I would strongly recommend visiting your Veterinarian for a physical examination and to see if Babygirl requires any medical management for any current condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kalou
Doberman Pinscher
4 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

fainting

Kalou was completely fine but fainted twice while running in the forest 4 days ago. When he was back he just got on his feet and continued running like nothing happened. Since then theres no symptoms but Im still worried it might happen again.
On auscultation I couldnt detect any murmurs or abnormal sounds, but the heart rate increases sometimes very sudden for several seconds and goes back to normal.
Maybe you have some ideas?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

There are a few different causes of fainting in dogs including dilated cardiomyopathy, heart arrhythmias, narcolepsy, brain inflammation, brain tumours, side effects of some medications or low blood pressure; approximately 65% of fainting episodes are heart related. With Kalou being a Doberman, there is a 44% chance (according to one study) of him having dilated cardiomyopathy; there may or may not be sounds during auscultation, but an x-ray of his chest would show heart enlargement. Also, an ECG would be a useful diagnosis tool to look for any other heart irregularities including blocks, arrhythmias and fibrillation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

what is the reason when the dog suddenly fell abruptly after urinate and then suddenly he stood as if nothing happened, one time I noticed blood in his mouth as he bit his tongue . Please help me , what is the cause of it ? I'm just worried for my vet.

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Malcolm
Shih Tzu
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Collapse
Cough
Yells as if in pain
Rolls over on back

I have a 12 yr old shih tzu who has suddenly started having episodes and was wondering if it could be congestive heart failure. He also has a skin condition and was recently treated for worms. He has very little physical activity.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

Coughing is usually the first symptom of congestive heart failure along with lethargy and a loss of appetite; the yelping and falling back may be due to pain from numerous causes. Taking Malcolm to his Veterinarian for an examination (auscultation and x-rays would be the basic examination) would be best to give you a diagnosis and for your Veterinarian to discuss treatment with you. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Yesterday I came home an found my 10 year old 3 pd yorkie dead on the floor. She has had a cough when she would get excited. Out of the blues one night she got upset barking an just fell over her legs got still. I picked her up an she came out of it an was ok again. Few days later I found her dead. My heart breaks because I didn't get time to get her to a vet an find whst caused the fainting. Or the coughing. We were at the very aweek ago exam said her heart sounded good. Her coat shined an eyes clear just if she got upset but she didn't have an appetite those last 3 or 4 days Pryor to her death. This,was all so sudden. I'm looking for answers an heart broken.

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Tiny
Chihuahua
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

legs giving out
heavy and frequent sleeping
Hearing loss

My dog fainted shortly after eating some chicken. That's what I believe happened because I looked over and she was passed out on the ground laying on her side. Her eyes were closed and she was making a soft whimpering noise. I called her name several times and she was unresponsive to me. She opened her eyes about 15 seconds later. She couldn't get up because her legs gave out on her. What could be the cause? I know she is old, but I am really concerned.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

There are numerous different conditions which may be affecting Tiny which may be connected to eating (postprandial hypotension) and other conditions like heart conditions, neurological disorders, hormonal, metabolic etc… I cannot really suggest anything without examining Tiny, it would be best to have a neurological examination and blood tests with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lexy
Maltese
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Fainting

Lexy, my 13 year old Maltese had 2 fainting episodes today. She was previously diagnosed with a Grade 5 heart murmur (?) and tracheal collapse. Prior to both episodes she was coughing. Veterinarian prescribed Vetmedin 1.25 - 1 tablet in morning and 1/2 tablet in evening. I understand that this is to allow the heart to beat stronger thereby improving blood flow.

My question is: should another of these episodes happen, what should I do right at that time? She was completely limp and unresponsive both times. I picked her up, kept gently shaking her, calling her name. Is there anything else I should do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

It can be distressing when you see your loved one go limp after a coughing fit; this would be due to the lack of oxygen to the brain causing Lexy to pass out, which stops her coughing so she can start breathing normally again. Without treating the tracheal collapse (which may not be desireable in an older dog) or respiratory infection if present, there isn’t really much to do. Supplemental oxygen after an episode may help but the procurement of equipment make it prohibitive. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Angel
Jack Russell Terrier
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Heart murmer
34 breaths per minute
fainting
Coughing

I have an 11 year old Jack Russell Terrier who fell over stiff a couple days ago after coughing and now is breathing rapidly (34 breaths per minute). She is at the worst at night. She was diagnosed with a stage 3 heart murmur 6 months ago. Could this be her heart failing?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

Fainting has two main causes; neurological problems or not enough blood circulation to the brain usually due to low cardiac output, if Angel’s heart doesn’t supply enough oxygenated blood to the brain she may faint and recover afterwards. The physiological resting respiratory rate in dogs is between 18-34 putting Angel at the top of the normal physiological range. Whilst fainting isn’t a direct sign of heart failure, it maybe a sign of heart failure in smaller breed dogs like Jack Russell Terriers with chronic valve disease. I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian to have a look at Angel (an echocardiogram would be useful in the diagnosis) as medical management may help to reduce the work load on the heart. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bandit
Boxer
1 Year
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

dilated pupils
excited
faint
Collapse

my dog got really excited and just fell over stiff. got back up in a few minutes totally fine but seemed startled.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

It sounds like Bandit may have narcolepsy; it can occur when a dog gets over excited they just collapse to the floor and then get up like nothing happened; it can be misdiagnosed as a seizure, but seizures are usually violent episodes with shaking, incontinence etc… There is no treatment for narcolepsy, but it is harmless and doesn’t progress in severity. Visit your Veterinarian for a neurological exam to ensure that nothing more sinister is occurring. Please check the link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
https://www.vetary.com/dog/condition/narcolepsy-and-cataplexy

We have a 6 year old greyhound that faints after she gets excited. Plays or gets excited that people came over then gets a scared look to her and stiffns up, eyes bulge a bit and becomes unresponsive. After a few minutes she comes around as if to say what happened and goes about her business. Crazy thing is it always happens in 2. The first episode happens and she just gets comfortable and calms down after coming out of the first and it happens again but doesn't last as long as the first.
There can be months in between episodes or they happen days apart. We had her checked by the cardiologist and she received a clean bill of health so we were told it's probably neurological and to explore that road.

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Bruno
English bull mastiff
6 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Fainting
Coughing

Should i be concerned

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations

Fainting in dogs is something that should never be ignored and should be investigated to ensure that the cause isn’t something more serious. Fainting in dogs may be caused by heart disease, lack of blood flow to the brain, brain tumours, infections, low concentrations of blood constituents, poisoning, side effects of medication or narcolepsy (usually occurs after excitement or other stimulus). A physical examination including chest x-rays, blood tests and other tests would be carried out to help determine the cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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