Pancreatic Cancer Average Cost

From 320 quotes ranging from $3,000 - 8,000

Average Cost

$6,000

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What is Pancreatic Cancer?

If a veterinarian diagnoses your cat with pancreatic cancer, it means your cat has a malignant tumor affecting the function of her pancreas. Your veterinarian may also refer to this tumor as a pancreatic adenocarcinoma, which distinguishes it from a non-benign tumor, or pancreatic adenoma. Adenocarcinomas are serious and often fatal. It is extremely important that you contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your cat may be suffering from pancreatic cancer. 

Your cat’s pancreas is responsible for the production of digestive enzymes and insulin. The pancreas is a critically important organ for digestion and the maintenance of healthy blood sugars. Any type of pancreatic insufficiency, the failure of the pancreas to produce the enzymes and hormones for which it is responsible, is serious and potentially fatal for your cat. One condition that may lead to pancreatic insufficiency in cats is a malignant or nonmalignant tumor.

Symptoms of Pancreatic Cancer in Cats

Symptoms of pancreatic cancer in cats may not manifest until late in the disease process. The symptoms of pancreatic cancer are very similar to those of pancreatitis, and your veterinarian will likely perform tests to eliminate a diagnosis of pancreatitis if he suspects your cat may have pancreatic cancer. Schedule an appointment with your veterinarian immediately if your cat is exhibiting one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain

If pancreatic cancer has advanced and spread to other organs, your cat may exhibit symptoms not specific to any one organ system, such as:

  • Bone or skeletal pain
  • Labored breathing
  • Hair loss
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes

Causes of Pancreatic Cancer in Cats

The exact cause of pancreatic cancer in cats is not understood at this time. Pancreatic cancer is more common among older cats, suggesting it may be related to advanced age or a combination of risk factors. Some cats and cat breeds are also genetically predisposed to cancer, suggesting there may be an inherited genetic component.

Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer in Cats

Your veterinarian will begin the diagnostic process with a comprehensive physical examination and collection of a comprehensive medical history. If the tumor is large enough, your veterinarian may palpate the mass near your cat's pancreas. While this is a good clue that a cat has a pancreatic tumor, it is not a definitive method of diagnosis. 

The next step in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in cats is the collection of urine and blood samples. Your veterinarian will order a chemistry profile, complete blood count and urine culture performed on these samples. Pancreatic cancer in cats typically manifests in labs as elevated white blood cells, low potassium, elevated bilirubin (jaundice), azotemia (build-up of metabolic waste in the blood), elevated blood sugars, and elevated liver enzymes. However, a cat whose cancer has not progressed may not exhibit any of these clinical findings. In that event, further diagnostic tests may be ordered.

Radiography (x-ray) imaging may show fluid buildup in the abdominal cavity. Ultrasonography may be used to visualize a soft mass over the pancreas.The only conclusive test for pancreatic cancer in cats, however, is a biopsy of the mass guided by an ultrasound or exploratory surgery. Your veterinarian will weigh the risk of performing these diagnostic procedures against the benefit of a confirmatory diagnosis.

Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer in Cats

If your veterinarian chooses to perform exploratory surgery, he will likely remove part or all of your cat's pancreas at the time of surgery. If the cancer has not metastasized and spread at this point, the chance of uncomplicated recovery is great.

In the event a cat's cancer has spread, as with late-stage cancers, your veterinarian may attempt surgical resection of the tumors. The success rate of this surgery is low, however. Unfortunately, there has been little success using radiation therapy or chemotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer in cats.

Recovery of Pancreatic Cancer in Cats

While advanced stages of pancreatic cancer in cats may carry a grave prognosis, there are some pain management and anti-inflammatory options to offer cats relief. Antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs are useful to reduce inflammation of the pancreas and relieve pain. 

Following surgery for diagnosis or tumor resection, the surgical site should be kept clean. Follow-up appointments with your veterinarian are crucial while the surgical site is healing to prevent infection or complications. 

A cat with pancreatic cancer may also suffer unpleasant gastrointestinal issues, such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Follow-up appointments with your veterinarian are important to keep a cat comfortable through these symptoms. A veterinarian may prescribe medications or a special diet to aid digestion.

Pancreatic Cancer Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Potsie
domestic short hair
12 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

My 12 year old cat had stopped eating and drinking fluids. I had brought him to the vet. He had some fluid in his abd. He had no symptoms such as vomiting or yellow sclera. He only was constipated. An ultrasound was done and he had pancreatic cancer with Mets to his liver and spleen. He passed away 3 days post diagnosis. His brother from the same litter has anorexia and beginning to lose weight. I do not palate any masses and he does not appear to be in pain. He is drinking. Is there a genetic component to pancreatic cancer. The cat that passed away had normal amylase, lipase and glucose. Should I bring his brother in for an exam and chemistry panel?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
If your cat passed recently, it may be just that your other cat is grieving for his brother which is something we see more commonly in dogs but is possible in cats. There are some suspicions of a genetic component to pancreatic cancer since some breeds are more prone to cancer than others but no link has been found; I would have your cat just examined to be on the safe side if this continues. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Scout
Maine Coon mix
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Increased Vocalization
isolation
Increased Heart Rate
Weight gain
Increased Urination

My cat keeps getting diagnosed with pancreatitis. She's on a strict diet since she got a ill several months ago with elevated kidney values. I'm not sure what is causing her to continuously get pancreatitis but I'm wondering if it's something further but the doctor cannot see right now. She eats her dry food and that's it. No treats. She has gained quite a bit of weight, 15.8lbs. No one knows what's going on.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
If Scout hasn't had an ultrasound, that would be the next best test to have for her. An ultrasound would evaluate her kidneys, her pancreas, and any other organ abnormalities that might be occurring. Cats are prone to a condition called 'triaditis' that responds to fairly specific therapy.

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Bruce
Black short hair
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Thirsty
Hungry
Appetite,

After our cat Bruce started vomiting several times a week, we took him to the vet and they found a mass on his pancreas. They did a needle biopsy and it was inconclusive. We were told that it was "most likely cancer" and there really isn't anything we can do about it because he is 11 years old and surgery/treatment would be too invasive. His condition deteriorated quickly and he soon couldn't keep any food down and barely any water. He hadn't eaten in a week and had lost over 2 lbs of his 13 lb original weight. We tried steroid shots and Celenia for anti-nausea, but nothing worked. We were one day away from ending his suffering...and he suddenly turned a corner. He was begging for food, eating several meals a day, drinking tons of water, and just being more alert and active! It's been several days of this now, and it appears his hunger is increasing. Increasing to the point where he is bugging us for food every couple of hours. Is this a symptom of cancer? Or is it possible that he never had it and is just trying to make up for all the meals he missed?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. That kind of turn around isn't typical for cancer, but I am happy for Bruce that he is feeling better! Possible causes may have been an infection, inflammation, or cancer, but from your description of his behavior, he seems to have overcome whatever was happening with his pancreas. I hope that he continues to do well!

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Moo
domestic short hair
8 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss

So our 8 year old cat was losing weight around February of this year. He used to weigh 16pds and when we took him
In for a normal checkup was down to 14. We got blood work done and everything came back fine except his liver count was a bit high. Long story short the vet recommended we get an ultrasound done in a couple weeks if we notice anymore weight loss. So we did, and it came back saying he has a small mass in his pancreas. We had hope because they said there was very little blood flow going to it so surgery to remove it would be an option. So we went ahead and did the surgery just this past Monday. They could not remove it because they said it would of been to detrimental for him and he might not of survived. They did manage to get a biopsy of the mass along with the lymph nodes that attached itself to the liver. Today Thursday we got the results back and his liver is fine but the mass is pancreatic acarsonoma. She said kemo is an option but will not stop it just slow it down and if no treatment he will
Live maybe 2 months. My question is why couldn’t we remove the pancreas and just give him whatever he needs? Such as insulin or whatever is needed for that kind of surgery. Or should I get a second opinion? He is only 9, was eating well and playing and everything before this surgery. Obviously anybody that has there stomach cut open is going to need to recover, but it’s terrible to think that nothing else can be done when all of his other vital signs and organs r fine. Please help
Steffanie

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Removing the pancreas is not a procedure that is commonly done, as it performs so many vital functions, and carcinomas are aggressive cancers. If your veterinarian saw that the entire pancreas was affected, they probably made the decision for him that removing it would be futile. Since I don't know more about Moo's situation, I can't say for sure, but if you do have any more questions, it is always reasonable to ask more questions of your veterinarian, or to seek a second opinion.

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Jack
domestic short hair
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

lack of appetite
High calcium levels
High kidney levels
Mass on pancreas
sudden weight loss

I recently had one of my cats pass away. Immediately afterwards, my oldest cat lost over 3 pounds in a week, refused to eat, began hiding all the time, and seemed very sluggish. Prior to this happening my vet noticed he had a distended stomach (about a month prior to) but we did x rays and nothing looked wrong. We did a cbc panel when the x rays were done and everything was normal. A month later, when all the sudden symptoms came about we did another cbc panel and he had high kidney levels, high calcium, and was showing signs of pancreatitis. We scheduled an ultrasound to determine if kidney disease was the cause for high levels but kidneys looked fine. We did however discover a mass on his pancreas. We did an asperite sample and what was pulled was fluid. The vet said it's likely that he has a cyst on his pancreas but sent the sample off for a cytology anyway. (still waiting results) the vet believes the high levels that were seen in the cbc panel could have been from severe dehydration and plans to retest in a week since he is now back to acting himself. His appetite has increased significantly, more than what is usually normal for him, he is no longer hiding and is slowly gaining weight back. He is sleeping a lot but he is also periodically active throughout the day. Everything online seems to imply that a tumor indicates pancreatic cancer. Since the mass was full of fluid is there still a chance that the cyst is cancerous? Could it simply be a severe case of pancreatitis? Are you familiar with anything like this?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
The cyst on Jack's pancreas may be just that, a cyst. Lesions on the pancreas can be cancerous or benign, but benign lesions can still cause inflammation and pancreatitis. You will know more once you get the cytology results back, and I am glad that he seems to be recovering!

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Isis
Siamese
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Hunger, polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss.

Medication Used

semintra

Isis is a 13 years old siamese. She has been vomiting 3/4 times a day, is VERY hungry all the time, she's losing a lot of weight, looks very skinny. We took her to the vet and has pancreatic insufficiency. He said it's most likely pancreatic cancer but wants to do a ecography. She's been like this for almost two months, but she still jumps, runs, purrs. I'd like to know if she might be able to get surgery and get chemo, or if it will only make her suffer. She already had breast cancer but recovered well, about a year and a half ago. I'd like to know what's the best option. Thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

If there is pancreatic cancer, treatment can be in vain as the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy is limited. I would wait the results of an ultrasound or exploratory laparotomy (which would provide a biopsy sample) before determining the treatment or prognosis. Without having further information, a decision cannot be made regarding treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I just found out by X-ray this afternoon that our fur baby has pancreatic cancer he is our world but we refuse to put him through biopsies and any further tests. Give your fur baby the best days and ease his pain. Ours spent 5 years with diabetes, went into remission in January but then developed chronic vomiting and diarrhea. Put him on a couple antibiotics, cerenia for the vomiting, prednisolone for the IBD but had to take him off due to elevated glucose levels. Today's X-rays showed fluid in abdomen, enlarged liver and pancreatic cancer. 😢

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Kat
tabby
15 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

pancreatitis and internal abcess

My 15 year old cat has had two serious bouts of pancreatitus. We have changed diets and for about a year she has not had symptoms. I have been cat sitting for 9 days and the other cat is not on a special diet. Although we try to keep our cat out of the food she has had some of the science diet the other eats. Yesterday I had to rush her to the vet and she has severe pancreatitus and internal abcesses. Can this be caused by 9 days of eating the other cats food?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Sudden dietary changes especially in a sensitive cat may cause pancreatic issues but I cannot say that the other food is the specific cause in this case; you should follow your Veterinarian’s instructions and monitor for improvement. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Gus
Shorthaired
15 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Hair Loss

My fur baby "Gus" will be 16 in human years in August.Over the past few mos, started losing weight and not eating much. Took him to the vet and they did labs and said that his pancreatic enzymes were up. Gave him a steroid shot and antibiotics by mouth. He finished the meds and seemed better. About 2 wks later, same symptoms. Went back to the vet and was given anti-nausea meds and something to increase appetite. He is not vomiting now. His appetite is better, but not as much as before he first started showing symptoms. But now, the main problem is that his hair is falling out in clumps. I have not noticed any particular overgrooming. He can just be walking around and clumps of hair will fall out. His hair is getting particulary thin along his back and around the hind quarters. This has me worried that it might be pancreatic cancer from some of the articles that I have read. What is your impression? No xrays or ultrasound has been done yet, as the vet felt pretty confident that it was just acute pancreatitis. Thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
There are many possible causes for hair loss in cats, paraneoplastic alopecia is rare in cats but may still occur; if no further testing was done on Gus originally you should think about returning to your Veterinarian for another examination and possibly an x-ray to rule out some other conditions. Without examining him, I cannot determine whether or not the cause is related to the pancreas or to something else. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sylvester
house cat
15 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Regurgitating food
watery diarrhea

Medication Used

Omeprazole
Prednisolone

My sweet Sylvester got an ultrasound & the vet saw a 2 inch mass on pancreas. He is more hungry than usual but tested neg for diabetes and thyroid problem. His diarrhea got better with cortison & esomeprazol. No vomits any longer.Will he benefit from antibiotics? How much time can he have left? He was diagnosed 3 weeks ago, got better the last week.He is still hungry but now also thirsty because of cortison. He gained weight.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It really depends on the type of mass found on the pancreas (hyperplasia, adenoma or adenocarcinoma) since this would have a strong determination of the overall lifespan and quality of life; without a biopsy we cannot be certain what the specific type is. You should keep in regular contact with your Veterinarian and monitor any changes or growth of the mass. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/digestive-system/the-exocrine-pancreas/pancreatic-neoplasms-in-small-animals

Thank you! The vet said that they don't recommend a biopsy, since the tissue is so close to the ducts. It hasn't got bigger since we first did the ultrasound (3 weeks ago). Are carcinomas of the pancreas as aggressive as in humans? Or do they grow slower? I'm thinking worst case scenario since we can't do biopsy, and vet is only taking the "wait and see" approach.
Very thankful for any comment about our family member.

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Curi
Cat
9 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Excessive stooling

Medication Used

none

My cat was recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer which has not metastasized. He had surgery for mass removal and is recovering nicely. He is eating, urinating and stooling. His stools are VERY abundant. It is soft and formed, light orange in color. He used to stool once a day, now its about twice a day and large enough that if you didnt know better, you would think it was a dog! Is this representative of his pancreatic cancer and is this interfering with his weight gain as he has been very slow to gain weight? What can we do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
I cannot say that an increase in defecation (size or frequency) is a factor of this surgery; however changes in faecal colour is attributable to issues with a lack of bile pigments being excreted. You should keep a close eye on Curi and follow up with your Veterinarian as directed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Misty
domesticshorthair
15 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

No signs of physical pain nor broken bones
No spinal issues
No heart issues
No loss of appetite
Yellow near mouth and near ears
Weight loss
Drinking lots of water
Hearing loss
Increased Appetite

Recently Misty had lost a lot of weight. A couple of days ago we noticed some yellowing around her mouth and ears. She has recently turned 15 years old. Misty has had a relatively healthy life with no major medical issues. All of this happened recently

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

With Misty’s age, there are numerous different possible problems; the yellowing of the skin would be an indicator of jaundice and liver health. I would highly recommend having a full blood test performed so that liver and kidney health can be determined and would be useful for a cat her age. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Midnight
Bombay Mix
11 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Hair Loss

We reviewed an ultrasound with our vet today and he found a 2 cm dark area and suspects a tumor. Midnight (birth date: Jan 9 2005) is not showing any visible symptoms except very minor hair loss towards the back of his hind legs. His stomach is not distended and he is not jaundiced. He doesn't experience any pain when we put pressure on his tummy. His b.m.'s are normal, but we saw evidence of an inflamed bladder. His breathing is fine and he has been vomiting very little since we changed from turkey to salmon a few months ago. My partner and I are open to diet change if it will help his quality of life. I know that there's no way to know exactly how or when Midnight will die, but I just want to know if we could narrow it down to a year or 6 months? Ultimately, I just want to give him the best quality of life that I can and right now, he is still his same loving self. How do I know when things are bad or when he is suffering and needs to go and how can I make things as comfortable and loving and peaceful for him as possible? Thank you so much. - Sam

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

I am assuming the tumour was discovered on Midnights pancreas, usually cats with tumours of the pancreas have a lifespan measured in months rather than years; however there are exceptions and it is impossible to give a definitive timeframe as each cat reacts differently and is also dependent on the current progression of the cancer (most cancers are caught when the cat is showing severe symptoms). There is no direct treatment, surgery is an option but may be futile in malignant tumours; but unless a biopsy is taken we are unsure about the type of tumour and the overall prognosis. Regular checks of Midnight are important to monitor the progression; regular x-rays will help to determine if there has been any spread of the tumour. A diet like Hills i/d may be beneficial. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ja
Siamese/Bengal
15 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss

Hi... I found your page during my incessant research to help my kid. He bean losing all this weight (from a 14-lb cat 3 yrs ago to barely over 8 lbs now), and, as suggested, I had him ultrasounded. Short version, mass near pancreas. Unsure if cancerous but likely. Due to weight & age (15), expl. surgery not recommended, and vet fears needle biopsy will "disturb and anger" the mass, which, if malig., can move/spread. BUT... it's been about 4 mos. since the ultrasound. He's maintaining around the same weight (a few tenths of a lb less maybe) and is hungry as all hell all the time, and in great spirits. Vet says it's bizarre because usually with panc. cancer they don't last more than a month. (On a side note, when he began vomiting / not holding anything down, I started him (against med. adv.) on CBD oil... within the HOUR he was no longer vomiting and has not vomited once since). I'm researching more about dosage of actual THC mixed with the CBD, as I've researched about what THC does to cancer cells. My question to you is... since insulin is produced by the pancreas, is there ANY chance that this could be diabetes? I would deeply appreciate your response, and of course, any other opinion you feel like offering, if you feel there is something else I need to know or do.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Diabetes is relatively easy to test for, and requires a simple blood test that can be performed by your veterinarian. If he does have pancreatic cancer, I'm very happy that he seems to be doing well, and i would enjoy every day with him!

Thank you, Dr. King!! I did not expect to get a response so quickly. Any chance that the "mass" near his pancreas could be anything other than cancer, and caused by something *like* diabetes? Have you seen any such case ever? (And IF you have time, what is your stance on CBD/THC for a cat?).

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Pilchard
moggy
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Pancreatic Cancer

Good Morning, We took our dear Boy Pilchard (13 year old cat) to our vet as he was pulling his fur out, literally in clumps. There was no skin problem diagnosed but the Vet noticed a yellowing and he diagnosed Pancreatic Cancer after an Ultrasound scan. He has put Pilchard on Meloxaid for inflamation/pain but he is still pulling his fur out. Otherwise he seems quite well, eating (always hungry though)!, drinking, even chasing his tail occasionally ! He is sick sometimes in the night, watery and with fur so I've put that down to the fur pulling. Any suggestions on the fur pulling please ?
Regards,
Lynn Cornwall, U.K.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without seeing Pilchard, I'm unfortunately not able to shed much light on why he might be pulling out his fur. If he has pancreatic cancer, sometimes there can be a related loss of skin and hair coat health, and that might be causing the problem. Since he was just seen at your veterinarian, it would be a good idea to give them a call, let them know that he is still pulling out his hair, and see if they have any suggestions what you might be able to do. In the meantime, if you brush him frequently, you may be able to get rid of some of the undercoat so that he isn't ingesting so much of it. I hope that he stays comfortable for quite a while longer!

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Chanu
Bombay black
10 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Severe loss of weight

My 10 year old female cat was diagnosed with a pancreatic tumor , which was removed by surgery day before yesterday. The veterinarian has not revealed whether its benign or malignant. But tumor had been well circumscribed. So probably a bening. But but I'm wondering whether since the pancreas is removed , the digestive enzymes are not there any more. How will it affect her and her diet?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
If Chanu's entire pancreas was removed, she will likely need to be on supplements to help digest her food. She may need further supplementation for insulin production as well - we don't typically remove the entire pancreas, and your veterinarian may have just removed the tumor. It would be best to check with them, as they know more details about the extent of the surgery and how much of the pancreas was removed. I hope that she does well.

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Jack
Shorthaired Domestic
11 Years
Unknown
Has Symptoms
Fluid In Abdomen
I brought my cat to the vet after noticing a lot of swelling in his belly. He was still drinking and eating well. Doctor ran blood test, drained and tested the fluid, did before and after x-rays followed by a sonogram. Based on results of all tests, the vet and sonogram technician concluded it is pancreatic adenocarcenoma. He doesn't seem to be in pain, still eating/drinking well, and pooping/peeing regularly. I understand it's a grim situation, but how long could I expect before he starts to feel pain? Is there anything we can do to help prevent continued fluid build up other than vet draining?
Sparky
Mix
14 Years
Critical
Has Symptoms
Weight Loss
Vomitting Bile Frequently
Lethargy
Hair Loss
Sparky was 14 and 2 months. He was vomiting bile and had lost about 14% of his weight in 8 months. I first took him to the vet because he had lost his hair on his hind legs and belly. Vet thought it was over grooming. The vomiting started about 2 months after the hair loss. Did bloodwork and his pancreas number was slightly elevated. Antibiotic and steroid shot. Cried for two weeks then was sneezing and seemed to have trouble breathing. Took him back to vet. His weight was now down 20% now less than a year later. He was eating, but I'm the last three days hiding in closets and under dresser which he has never done. Seemed very weak. Did an ultrasound and found pancreatic cancer. Decided he was in too much pain and said goodbye after 14+ amazing years. I didn't want to, but he was suffering.