How to Train Your Chihuahua Dog to Be Friendly

Medium
4-10 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

All puppies are sweet and cute; yours will be no different. Chihuahuas are sweet and cute dog breeds as well, and your Chihuahua will be super friendly to you. Chihuahuas are a unique dog breed in that they fall in love quickly with their masters but don't often have any interest in meeting other people or other dogs. 

Chihuahuas are very comfortable within their own spaces, so to teach your Chihuahua to be friendly you need to expand his personal space. Having a friendly Chihuahua means your dog won't give off the scary bark every time your doorbell rings or a guest walks in the house. A friendly Chihuahua won't growl at your guests as they reach over to pet him or pick him up. A friendly Chihuahua sits in your lap and allows others to be near you. A Chihuahua, if not taught to be friendly to other people will come across as aggressive and possibly even mean. This is not what their personality is; they are just built to be the only dog in your universe and need to be trained that your universe doesn't always revolve around them.

Defining Tasks

The trick to training your Chihuahua to be friendly from the start is to get him social as early as possible. If you are adopting a Chihuahua puppy into your family, let as many people handle him as possible as soon as you bring him home. If you have other dogs in your household, let them interact with your new Chihuahua. If this is a puppy, as always, be cautious with any older dogs or larger dogs around your new Chihuahua because he is small and tender.
Under your close supervision, let your Chihuahua and your other pets explore and get to know one another. A social Chihuahua knows how to be friendly because he has been exposed to more than just his owner. A Chihuahua who lives and breathes for his owner only and does not know the breadth of the world around him can sometimes come off as aggressive or unfriendly. You can also teach an older Chihuahua to be friendly, it just may take more time for some of the older guys because they are set in their ways and need to learn new behaviors.

Getting Started

Start training your Chihuahua to be friendly as soon as you bring him home. To do this, be sure to socialize him as much as you can with people as well as with other pets. If you are introducing your Chihuahua to other pets, be sure to have treats for both animals on hand so they can meet on common ground over food. If you are introducing your Chihuahua to other animals that do not live in your home, be sure you know the owners and are comfortable with the animals to keep both animals safe during your initial meeting. Be persistent and consistent with his training. Your Chihuahua can be friendly to people and animals, but you have to insist he behaves as so. Keep your dog training sessions short with lots of rewards.

The Boundaries Method

Most Recommended
5 Votes
Step
1
Commands
As leader of the pack in your house, teach your Chihuahua all the commands he can learn. Start with the basics to get him to sit and lie down on command. Then move on to cute tricks like standing on hind legs, rolling over, or begging. Little dogs can learn a lot of fun tricks that will give him positive attention when performed. Be sure to end any training session with treats along with the treats he earns while learning.
Step
2
Food
Do not let your Chihuahua free feed. Provide his meals to him on a set schedule. Make a big deal out of preparing is meals and setting them down at meal times.
Step
3
'Wait' command
If at all possible, train your Chihuahua to stand back away from you while you are preparing the meal and putting it in place. Your Chihuahua should be able to see you prepare his meals but not be allowed to jump or beg while you are making his food. You can train the ‘wait’ command to help with this.
Step
4
Territory
Show your dog what part of your home is his territory. When house training, take the Chihuahua on a leash to one part of your yard, training him to only use that area. By keeping him on a leash and showing him where to go, you are showing him you are alpha-dog and will make the rules.
Step
5
Shared spaces
While your dog is in training to be a good social dog, keep him off your couch or bed. Give him a comfortable bed near you but down on the floor as he is learning to be under your command. Be sure to acknowledge him with treats and a calm tone when talking, but do not let him on your level until you can trust him to be a friendly, well-rounded pet.
Step
6
Social
Socialize your Chihuahua as often as you can to get him used to people and other dogs. The earlier and more often you can do this, the better adapted he will be once he’s around people and pets without you coaching him along the way.
Step
7
All together
Once your dog has gone through obedience training, has been socialized, understands who feeds him and his role while waiting for his meals, and knows he has to earn his place on the couch or in your spaces, even your arms, put all these things together and have him around people and pets more. If he’s well trained and well adapted, he will do fine.
Recommend training method?

The Respect Training Method

Effective
5 Votes
Step
1
Position
Establishing the leader of the pack role with your Chihuahua and demand respect for yourself. Over time, he will get that you expect him to be respectful of others as well.
Step
2
Set boundaries
Set your boundaries early on. If your Chihuahua is acting aggressively or growling, put him down or do not pick him up to begin with. Babying or coddling this behavior will only enforce the behavior as good for your Chihuahua.
Step
3
Remain calm
Do not discipline your Chihuahua with angry voices or tones. Yelling at your Chihuahua only sends mixed messages of aggression and anger. Remain calm and redirect your Chihuahua when you see him misbehaving or acting in an aggressive manner.
Step
4
Wait
Train your dog to wait. In all occasions as you see fit, from walking out the door to feeding times, have your Chihuahua wait for what he wants. Walk through the doorway first, holding it open for your pup to follow. Have your Chihuahua watch you prepare a meal and make him sit and wait patiently as you set the bowl down before he is allowed to eat.
Step
5
Work dog
Make your dog earn privileges. You can ask him to do commands before eating, such as sit. Before you pick him up or let him into your bed or on the couch, have him 'beg' or stand on his hind legs to be picked up.
Step
6
Social dog
As early as you can, have your dog be social with people as well as other pets. Use your commands with your Chihuahua as he is getting to know his world. This will teach him how to behave around others
Step
7
Friendly dog
If your dog has learned commands from you, is social, knows to work for what he wants, and respects you, he will carry that respect around to others as well. Make sure he knows you expect him to be friendly and continue to use commands for respect when he is with people and pets to ensure his behavior is up to par.
Recommend training method?

The Set Rules Method

Least Recommended
5 Votes
Step
1
From the start
Before you bring a Chihuahua into your home, decide your boundaries. Set boundaries with sleeping arrangements, whether or not your Chihuahua will sleep in your bed, be allowed on your couch, or be held much of the time. Set physical boundaries within your home, such as not allowing the Chihuahua in the bathroom with you or in the kitchen while you are cooking.
Step
2
Obedience training
As soon as you bring your Chihuahua home, begin obedience training. Chihuahuas can be stubborn, so do not give up even if your dog stops showing interest. Offer high-value treats during training and keep your sessions short. Start with the basics to set yourself up as the leader of the pack. If this isn’t done early, your Chihuahua may become the leader before you even know it.
Step
3
Aggression
Your Chihuahua will growl a lot, especially as he is meeting people and pets in your world. Do not allow him to get away with growling at your guests. Do not show him affection or hold him if he’s going to be aggressive. Be firm and ignore poor behavior but overly reward good behaviors.
Step
4
Good behavior
When you catch your Chihuahua being friendly to someone within your household, a guest, or another pet, reward him with a tasty high-value treat. When setting your boundaries, decide if lap sitting or couch sitting will be allowed as long as your Chihuahua is well behaved. If so, when he is good, allow these things as rewards.
Step
5
Socialize
Get your Chihuahua out as often as possible to see the big wide world. He needs to be comfortable with people coming into your home and with other pets being near you. A Chihuahua who is not well socialized will stick to his owner and fear anyone else. From early on, take your Chihuahua anywhere you can take him. Let people hold him or pet him while he’s on the ground. Introduce him to other dogs.
Step
6
Treats
Always end social time, training time, good behavior moments, and affection moments with a treat.
Recommend training method?
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Written by hannah hollinger

Published: 12/20/2017, edited: 04/16/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Piper
Chihuahua
11 Months
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Piper
Chihuahua
11 Months

What if my dog just does not understand the word wait?. And should I take piper on walks up and down my driveway for more exercise?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lexi, Check out the videos linked below for a couple of different ways you can teach wait: Wait using leash: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00hglPctKpw Wait for puppy and harder wait walking away: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c--37qrAG2A Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sweet Pea
Chihuahua
4 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Sweet Pea
Chihuahua
4 Years

My chihuahua may have trained Lucky to bark at other dogs, or at least trained Lucky to behave in her way.

How do I get her to stop training Lucky to be bad? Should I separate the two until Lucky's trained? I think maybe Sweet Pea is hindering our progress in training, so...

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kien, Separating the two dogs would help Lucky not to learn bad habits from her. Once he is fully trained it will be easier to enforce your rules for just him. The best option is to train both dogs, so that both behave well and listen. This is sometimes doable and something not. Training just one dog is a lot of work, training two takes a lot of time and since Lucky is the priority right now with his age and size, it will depend on how difficult Sweet Pea's problem behaviors are whether or not that is something you want to tackle right now. Separating will be easier temporarily. Even working on Sweet Peas's general respect for you and having consistent rules around the house that you decide on and enforce will help both dogs, rather than the dogs being the ones to make and enforce the rules for each other. Check out the article that I have linked below to help Sweet Pea learn to listen. Enforce what you feel you are able to while still focusing the most on Lucky's training, and keep the dogs separate for the things that are too difficult to train both dogs on right now, like Sweet Pea's aggression. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Foxy
Chihuahua
4 Years
0 found helpful
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Foxy
Chihuahua
4 Years

I adopted Foxy a little over a year ago. He was surrendered to a shelter because he “barked too much” for previous owner. He is fine with me and my fiancé and my fiancé’s mother because she is over a lot. He barks aggressively at anyone else who enters our home. He also barks at other people and dogs when we are out on walks. I try to take him when there are not many other people out but I know avoiding the issue isn’t good either. What can I do to help him?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Becky, First, you need to determine why he is barking. Is he overly sensitive and used to barking, fearful of people, possessive of you or your home. If he is overly sensitive, then you need to desensitize him to people and the things that indicate people are about to come over like the video linked below; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA If he is fearful or acting possessive of you (looks like he is protective or is fine in other locations away from you and his home), or simply dislikes people, then check out Jeff Gellman from solidK9Training's Youtube training channel. He specializes in various types of aggression, reactivity and fearfulness. The exact program you will follow would depend on why he generally is barking, and would look like giving a lot of structure and boundaries through obedience commands, calm interaction, long Place and Down Stay commands, structured heeling, consistent leadership, and things that help with calmness, then interrupting the unwanted behavior as soon as he shows signs of it, and rewarding the correct behavior after he stops the unwanted behavior, then practicing the whole thing until he becomes relaxed around people. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Messi
Chihuahua
7 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Messi
Chihuahua
7 Years

We recently adopted Messi from an abusive home and he came with some unfavorable traits. He is mostly nice and laid back, but occasionally he becomes EXTREMELY aggressive. For example, if you try to move him from the bed while he is resting he will attempt to bite your arm off. You can’t even pick him up to move him without getting bit, it takes him sometimes 20-30 times telling him “OFF!” in my deepest voice. He also will occasionally try to bite if he doesn’t want to be picked up, if you grab his toy at the wrong time, or walk near his food bowl. Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Chloe, I suggest hiring a professional who has a lot of experience with different types of aggression, comes highly recommended by other clients, and uses both fair corrections and positive reinforcement. Messi needs to be desensitized to being touched, he needs to be desensitized to wearing a silicone basket muzzle (so that you can safely work with him and help him learn that biting does not get him what he wants), and he needs to be put on a protocol to teach him respect safely. For the respect training, I suggest starting by making him work for everything he gets in life. Before you feed him, take him outside, pet him, or play with him require him to obey a command to earn the thing that he wants. Sit, Down or Watch Me are three examples of commands he can do. To desensitize him to the muzzle you will want to show him the muzzle and give him a treat. Repeat that until he is comfortable, then touch the muzzle then give a treat. Repeat that until he is comfortable, then gradually move the muzzle closer and closer as he gets comfortable. Finally, you can buckle the muzzle, feed him treats through the muzzle's holes, then take the muzzle off again. You can increase the amount of time he wears the muzzle for until he has worked up to wearing it for a couple of hours. Expect getting him comfortable with the muzzle to take a couple of weeks. I suggest introducing the muzzle, working on respect, and getting him used to being handled with the help of a qualified trainer who can do it safely with you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mitzi
Chihuahua
6 Years
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Question
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Mitzi
Chihuahua
6 Years

6 months ago I rescued Mitzi from a puppy mill. She was used as a breeder her entire life. As a result, she never had any training or socialization. She is extremely attached to me and will tolerate my husband when I'm not available. However, she goes off the rails when my adult sons come into the house. She barks at them and acts like she will take them apart. When she won't calm down, I remove her from the room and isolate her. When she is calm I bring her out again. However, she goes right back to viciously barking at my sons if they're in her line of sight. Interestingly, she will let them pet her if I'm holding her. If she is in my lap or on the floor she is ready to kill them. What can I do to alter this behavior?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sandra, I suggest finding a trainer who can help you with the training from the video below. Since your children are adults, they should be able to carefully following the instructions from the video and remain calm around her while they practice the training. At first, you will probably need your sons to be further away, while your dog is leashed to something like the dog in this video so that she cannot charge them. When she behaves poorly, you can correct her with a low level stimulation or vibration from an e-collar. When she is calm, have them toss her a treat. When she can handle them being close, then they can hand feed treats like the video below when she is behaving nicely. Do not reward her aggressive behavior. If she cannot calm down, interrupt her with a mild correction or add more space between your sons and her while you practice to make the training easier. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Maggie
Chihuahua
16 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Maggie
Chihuahua
16 Weeks

We have had Maggie for almost a week. She is 16 weeks old. Maggie can be loving and sweet but growls and bites if you pet her, pick her when she is alseep or get to close to her face. We have introduced her to guests and is aggressive toward them. Try to bite their hand off. Help! Her behavior is making bonding difficult.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Christine, You need to hire a professional trainer to help you right away. At four months she is showing a lot of fear and aggression and that is not normal at that age. She was probably never socialized or possibly even traumatized. Work on feeding her her food one piece at a time and rewarding calmness, focus on you, choosing to be near you (don't force her), and any touches she tolerates. Once she is comfortable being near you, with the help of a trainer you can work on getting her used to touch by giving her a piece of food every time you gently touch her somewhere while you touch her. Stop touching her as soon as she finishes eating the piece of food. Later you can have willing friends and family members give her pieces of her food for being calm around them, choosing to be close to them, and focusing on them in a good (curious) way. When she can tolerate simply being around the guests, then they can work on giving her a piece of food every time she let's them gently touch her somewhere. She can be fed her entire food as treats throughout the day. As long as she eats the same amount of food per day, she does not need to be fed in a bowl. If there is leftover food from what you measures out for her for the day, you can give that in a bowl. You need a trainer in this case. Look for someone who is experienced with aggression and fear, has good reviews or comes well recommended, and ask that trainer questions to see if they seem experienced. Look for a trainer who will do private lessons with you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

she lookes so cute

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Question
Pancho
Chihuahua
14 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Pancho
Chihuahua
14 Weeks

I got my Pancho at 12 weeks. When we went out to the yard for potty he was scared of cars, noises, people, cats, and dogs. I have been asking him to sit for treats when I can see him get scared, though ssometimes the trigger is too much and he tries to run away. When people are getting close to him he tries to run away and if they stop to talk to him and get a bit close or try to pet him he pulls away and growls. He tries to run from dogs he sees and barks, growls, and lunges at them if they are close. I have been bringing friends over a few times a week and he has gone from growling to being a bit shy at first but warming up to them and falling asleep next to them on the sofa. He sleeps in a crate in pur bedroom at night and during the day he either sleeps in his crate in the living room or on the sofa. Should I stop him from sleeping or being on the sofa with us or guests?
All I wanted was a lovely small dog who was nice to people and animals that I could take everywhere with me. I didn't want a mean yippy dog. I brought him to a puppy social but he hid under a table and lunged at other dogs. I have tried bringing him out on walks around the block but he gets too scared and eventually tries to run away. I don't drive but I can walk to the local park, take the train to town, the seafront is nearby. He struggles to walk all the way to the places I want to show him. Should I introduce him to new places even though he gets scared?
Any advice would really help I'm so sad about his fear and growling.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shay, Don't give up on socializing him. He probably needs the socialization to go slower, be more gradual, and involve a lot of rewards like treats, whenever he acts brave (in a good way) or calm around new things (don't reward the aggressive behavior though). The issue is likely inherited, but dogs who are naturally more shy need socialization even more to make up for their natural fearfulness. He might also be going through a fear period, which is a period when the dog is learning about what's safe and not and the world can seem even scarier during those two weeks that each fear-period tends to last. Keep socializing during this period, but try to avoid overwhelming situations and make the social experiences as pleasant as you can. For example, recruit lots of friends to socialize him one at a time (instead of a whole group coming over) and toss him treats without trying to pet him yet. Instruct them to ignore him while they toss the treats, until he approaches on his own as he warms up. Act confident and happy yourself around new things he is deciding about...For example, if he sees something new on a walk or passes a dog on the other side of the street, do a little excited dance and talk to him in sing-song voice... essentially act happy and silly to lighten the mood and change his mind about the situation. I highly suggest hiring a trainer who has a lot of successful experience helping shy dogs. The earlier you start, the better the outcome is likely to be. Find someone who can do training sessions with you in lots of different types of locations, like meeting you at the pet store, park, a friend's house, your neighborhood, hardwear stores, or outside of other training classes at her facility (so that you can help him get used to the sight of other dogs and people without overwhelming him and crowding him with up-close interactions yet. If she has access to her own, patient, calm dogs to help socialize him gradually with them, even better. He needs lots of extra help and lots of positive interactions with others, without overwhelming him too much. Anxious dogs also tend to do well with a lot of structure and rules in their life. Have him work for things like food, walks, and ball throws at home, by having him perform a command, like sit first. Teach him "Place" and work on him staying there calmly (you can give him a chew toy to chew on while on Place). Teach him to Heel during walks instead of walking on the end of the leash and leading you. Work on his focus on you. Rules and boundaries can help an anxious dog trust and respect you and relax more when they feel like you are in control of things and dependable and confident. If he is respectful of you and get off the sofa when told to, the sofa is likely not an issue. If he acts possessive of the sofa, does not listen to you when you tell him to get off, or it is otherwise causing issues, then the should not be on the sofa. When guests are over, if he is acting possessive, pushy, or aggressive while on the sofa, then he should not be on the sofa. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Snowbell
Chihuahua
9 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Snowbell
Chihuahua
9 Years

How do I get my dog to be nice to guests , and also I am getting a new chihuahua and I want it to be friendly straight away

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Question
Dio
Chihuahua
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Dio
Chihuahua
4 Months

When I let my 4 month old chihuahua outside to potty he runs off and will not listen to me when I try to get him back inside. When I put him on his leash he thinks we are going on a walk and will stay right beside me and not use the bathroom. What tips do you have?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sean, I suggest purchasing a long (30'-50' foot) water proof leash (waterproof in case it gets peed on or grass is wet) such as a tie out material leash (with wire core and rubber sheath and clip) or a poly check cord. Teach "Come" and "Inside" and use the "Reel In" method from the article linked below to teach them. You will teach both the same way you would teach a recall but you want to teach two separate words and practice both separately because you will use "Inside" for the yard and less fun things and save "Come" for emergencies so that "Come" does not become unpleasant like "Inside" will be sometimes... Recall article - follow the Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall After he knows "Inside," clip the 50 foot leash to his collar or a padded harness and tell him to "Go Potty" and let him drag the leash around and sniff around and walk away from you to go potty. After he goes potty, praise him and toss him a couple of treats. If he does not come back on his own after going potty, then tell him "Inside". If he comes inside when you tell him to, reward him with another treat when he gets inside. If he disobeys your Inside command, reel him in with the long leash and do not give a treat - simply act matter of fact but not angry. The goal is to: 1. First teach him a command for inside so that he clearly understands your expectations and does not think you are playing with him by chasing him... 2. To reward him after he goes potty every time for a while to help him learn the "Go Potty" command so that he will go potty quickly even while on th leash, and so that he will automatically want to come back to you after peeing to get his treat. 3. To enforce the "Inside" command by reeling him in so that he learns that obedience is not optional; he has to obey, but if he does it willingly then you will reward him. You can give him treats less frequently when he is coming inside consistently - so that he is just praised and occasionally surprised with a fun treat, but does not need to treat in order to obey. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Blue
Chihuahua
7 Months
0 found helpful
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Blue
Chihuahua
7 Months

Won’t stop jumping nipping and scratching also hard to potty train

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Talina, Check out the Step Toward method (being careful not to step on due to size) for jumping: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump For the biting, work on teaching the Leave It command: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the potty training, I suggest using the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Since pup is a bit older you can adjust the times, to take pup potty every 2-3 hours, give 1-1.5 hours of freedom after going potty outside, and taking pup potty 45 minutes-1 hour after crating if pup doesn't go when you take them the first time. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pancho
Chihuahua
8 Years
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Question
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Pancho
Chihuahua
8 Years

Pancho is 8 years old. He does not like toddlers. I felt it has gotten worst since now I have a toddler. He growls at her if she is close to him. She can’t pet him. Amy suggestions?

Thanks,

Sharlene

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sharlene, I suggest hiring a private trainer to help you since the training needs to be done carefully and a lot things need to be demonstrated during the training. Check out the video linked below of a dog on a leash for safety being rewarded with treats for being calm by someone he is afraid of: Aggression video: https://youtu.be/mgmRRYK1Z6A Practicing with dog and kid: https://youtu.be/9n0_27XY3z4 Also kid and dog: https://youtu.be/gblDgIkyAKU Safety should be number one priority so I suggest using leashes and if needed a basket muzzle while training or in general. I also suggest teaching your toddler to leave your dog alone (easier said than done I know). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
cooper
Chihuahua
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
cooper
Chihuahua
2 Years

My chihuahua puppy is so sweet to me and the immediate people in our house but he is terribly mean to anyone new that comes in our house or tries to touch him. We did puppy school and it helped with his obedience but it didnt get rid of him being territorial and aggressive with new people. I'm out of ideas and a little disheartened. Im not sure what to do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Puppy school is great for teaching obedience but it can't accomplish the specific things that need to be improved, that's where private in-home training comes in, especially if he tends to do well with people out in public but is behaved badly at home. I highly suggest finding a trainer who will do private aggression training with you, to tailor a program to his needs. Look for someone who is part of a training group where there are multiple trainers - who can practice being 'strangers' for the training. For training to work he likely needs to practice the training around a variety of different people in your home. Additional encounters with people outside of your home can also be beneficial but most training needs to happen at home at first if that is where the main problem is. When searching for a trainer ask questions. Not all trainers are experienced with aggression so look for someone who has a history of success working with aggression. Read reviews or ask for client referrals from those who had aggressive dogs. Without more details about the aggression I cannot offer specific advice on training, but most types of aggression benefit from building the dog's respect and trust for you. Additional training can then be build off of that foundation. Check out the articles and videos linked below: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo The above training links help to lay a good foundation, more specific training will depend on what type of aggression he has, how he is reacting to people, and other possible clues into his behavior that would help determine a good training protocol. Check out the video linked below for one exercise that can be done with people. Notice the back tie leash that keeps the person that the dog does not know safe. There are likely other things that need to be practiced as well though. https://youtu.be/mgmRRYK1Z6A Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Guppy
Chihuahua
6 Months
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Guppy
Chihuahua
6 Months

I am working on socializing Guppy as much as possible so she grows up to be a friendly happy girl. I have a 3 yr old son who she is completely fine with. As part of her socialization, I try to take her everywhere with me. Recently, while at a friend’s house, Guppy was off leash and started growling at one of my friend’s daughters. How should I correct/modify this behavior?

Thank you,
Amanda

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amanda, Right when the incident happens, I would tell her "Ah Ah" firmly, get between her and the child or remove me from what she is being possessive of and make her leave the area. That is just to show her that that's not acceptable though. To prevent future occurrences, have that child and other children of various ages practice giving her obedience commands that she knows and giving her treats when she obeys. Supervise and help them as needed. You want to teach respect but also trust. You want to do this in a way that helps her relax and associate the kids with fun things like rewards. Having the kids take her for walks, feed her her entire dinner one piece at a time (from a zip-lock and not her bowl) everytime she does something for them like sit, act friendly, or act calm, or play a game like fetch but sit when you old to get the ball and drop the ball on command. Make the encounters rewarding and fun for her but also structured to build both trust and respect. Also, don't let kids tease her or scare her. The encounters should be rewarding. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Alexander
Chihuahua
8 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Alexander
Chihuahua
8 Months

My pup likes to bark and everything outside and does growl and want to eat people other than me my daughter my son my parents and my ex husband. Above it said put dog down and ignore him. But dont we have to protect the guests from being eaten lol Do we calmly put him in his crate? i dont want the crate to be punishment but i want the barking and growling to stop. he is a really good boy as far as totally potty trained,. sits rolls over. fetches a ball and brings it back repeatly.... super smart.. however this one thing.....

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Patti, The article you commented on was written more to address preventing aggression. Since Alexander is already displaying aggression you are correct that you need to do things differently. Having boundaries and not encouraging his aggressive behavior is certainly important too, like the article states, but you do need to take measures to protect guest and the aggression needs to be treated differently than what you would do to prevent it in most cases. Check out this video by Jeff Gellman, who specializes in aggression. Here he demonstrated safety measures (a back tie), when to have guest reward a dog (during calmness and not during aggressive displays), and how to appropriately use punishment when treating aggression (with good timing, calmness, and in combination with positive reinforcement for calm behavior and with the appropriate safety measures for your guests). Aggression video: https://youtu.be/mgmRRYK1Z6A Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Gypsy
Chihuahua
3 Years
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Gypsy
Chihuahua
3 Years

Hi!
I have a 3 year teacup long haired chihuahua that my mother got me while I was still living at home. Recently I have moved out and I am living in apartments while going to college. Where I live there is constant people around, other dogs, and I like to have friends over every once in a while. While living at my mothers house he was the only dog around, never really had company over other than family every once in a while and we live far off into the woods with no noise surrounding so he was pretty spoiled. Now I live around noisy neighbors (can hear them above, beside us and walking by door), many neighbors has dogs they also walk and have and I have people over some times. He is very territorial about me particular (always has been), but he barks constantly with neighbors, growls, charges and barks at neighbors and dogs when passing, and some of my friends boyfriends (he's really funny about males; he never liked my younger brother much and he never socialized with him, but liked my dad) he will bark and growl at them the entire time they are in my apartment even tries to chase after them and nip at their heels. No matter how much I yell at home, get onto him, pop his butt, he does not care. The next time it happens he's right back to acting out. PLEASE help me learn how to make him more social. I would love to be able to take him for a walk without him freaking out.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carlee, Check out this video by Jeff Gellman, who specializes in aggression. Here he demonstrated safety measures (a back tie), when to have people reward a dog (during calmness and not during aggressive displays), and how to appropriately use punishment when treating aggression (with good timing, calmness, and in combination with positive reinforcement for calm behavior and with the appropriate safety measures for your guests). Aggression video: https://youtu.be/mgmRRYK1Z6A It sounds like he needs a lot of structure and boundaries in general to build respect. Have him work for everything he gets for a while by having him perform a command first. For example, have him sit before you feed him, lay down before you pet him, look at you before you take him outside, ect.. If he nudges you, climbs into your lap uninvited, begs, or does anything else pushy, make him leave the room. Teach him a Place command and work on him staying on place for up to an hour, even when you walk into the other room for a minute. Practice crate manners. Work on teaching a structured Heel. Forget about getting places during a walk for a while right now, instead go somewhere open, like your front yard, a park, or culdesac and practice a heel where his nose does not go past your leg. You need to hire a trainer to help you with the aggression and you need someone who uses a lot of boundaries, positive reinforcement and fair discipline tactfully. Look for someone who is very experienced with aggression and different types of aggression - many trainers are only experienced with fear-based aggression and you likely have some dominance- based or territorial/possessive aggression going on too, and they are treated a bit differently than fear. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Domino
Chihuahua
2 Years
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Domino
Chihuahua
2 Years

My Chihuahua who I adopted about three months ago from a local animal shelter is very hard to train and is crazy. He will start barking when a new person comes to the house to visit and does not disturb him. He will not stop tying to attack and bark at them. He also will pull on the leash a lot on walks and try to attack every dog and person he sees and will not stop barking, growling, and being aggressive. I have tried to train him with multiple methods, but will not listen to me. Although, he does know basic commands he will not listen when I tell him to stop barking and attacking people. Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alexis, Check out this video by Jeff Gellman, who specializes in aggression. Here he demonstrated safety measures (a back tie), when to have people reward a dog (during calmness and not during aggressive displays), and how to appropriately use punishment when treating aggression (with good timing, calmness, and in combination with positive reinforcement for calm behavior and with the appropriate safety measures for your guests). Aggression video: https://youtu.be/mgmRRYK1Z6A It sounds like he needs a lot of structure and boundaries in general to build respect. Have him work for everything he gets for a while by having him perform a command first. For example, have him sit before you feed him, lay down before you pet him, look at you before you take him outside, ect.. If he nudges you, climbs into your lap uninvited, begs, or does anything else pushy, make him leave the room. Teach him a Place command and work on him staying on place for up to an hour, even when you walk into the other room for a minute. Practice crate manners. Work on teaching a structured Heel. Forget about getting places during a walk for a while right now, instead go somewhere open, like your front yard, a park, or culdesac and practice a heel where his nose does not go past your leg. You need to hire a trainer to help you with the aggression and you need someone who uses a lot of boundaries, positive reinforcement and fair discipline tactfully. Look for someone who is very experienced with aggression and different types of aggression - many trainers are only experienced with fear based aggression and you likely have some dominance- based or possessive aggression going on too, and they are treated a bit differently than fear. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Trubel
Chihuahua breed
8 Weeks
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Trubel
Chihuahua breed
8 Weeks

Trubel is a very sweet and active pup and shows respect to me and some obedience as i have set boundaries. however, are there any videos on training the pups with basic commands and potty training? being winter months and him not having completed his vaccines, i am not comfortable taking him outside as yet.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Radhika, Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Also, check out this article on puppy classes and socialization. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ As far as potty training, check out the free e-book download from the website I have linked below. In the AFTER You Get Your Puppy book, there is a section on potty training, which also includes how to teach pup to go potty on a real grass pad in an exercise pen if you can't crate train and take them potty outside. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads You can also modify the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, using real grass pads in place of a litter box, putting the exercise pen in a room you can close off later when pup doesn't need the potty anymore (You only want pup using potty inside in an area of the house he can't access later if you plan to outside potty train later - so he won't get into the habit of soiling other areas of the house), and not phase out the exercise pen - instead transition to crate training and pottying outside when the weather is better. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - most also found on amazon www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Dawson
Chihuahua
7 Months
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Question
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Dawson
Chihuahua
7 Months

We adopted Dawson from a rescue about a month ago where he was fostered with a very loving family. Foster family said he had no problems with other dogs/people, got along well with children, and was generally friendly. Unfortunately, that has not been the case with us- what should we do to help him be comfortable/not be aggressive and fearful of all new people/places/dogs/things?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emma, Honestly, I suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues. If pup truly was fine with the foster family, the way they managed pup and interacted with him may have made a huge issue. You would need someone who could show you in person how to give him the structure, boundaries, and calm leadership he needs to help boost his confidence, trust in you, and to look to you instead of trying to control situations himself. I suggest looking for a trainer who uses both positive reinforcement and fair corrections, combined with a lot of structures, boundaries, obedience, and positive reinforcement - when he is doing well. Check out Thomas from the Canine Educator, and Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training. Both have their own YouTube channels with lots of free educational videos about aggression and using obedience and structure to build confidence and deal with aggression. Thomas is a bit gentler and Jeff has more years of experience - so you can learn slightly different things from each. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Scoppy
Chihuahua
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Scoppy
Chihuahua
12 Weeks

It so hard to train him to Pee and poop outside or on the pad

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Melanie, First, decide whether you want pup to go potty inside or outside and stick with that. If you want pup to do both it needs to be long term because once you teach pup to potty inside, it's harder to prevent accidents inside when an indoor potty isn't available. If you plan to teach pup to do both, I suggest using a disposable real grass pad instead of pee pad for the indoor training to make it more consistent with outside pottying. Disposable real grass pad brands - also off Amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com With all that said, for indoor potty training I suggest following the Crate Training or Exercise Pen methods from the article linked bellow. The method mentions a litter box but you can also use the same methods with grass pads or pee pads and the steps are the same. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy For outside potty training I suggest following the Crate Training method, which can be combined with the tethering method once pup is doing better with potty training, if you want to give pup more free time out of the crate. Start with just the crate training method to help pup catch on initially though, especially if pup is having a lot of accidents right now. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pluto
Chihuahua
8 Weeks
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Pluto
Chihuahua
8 Weeks

Just got Pluto for my 8 year old son to be an emotional support animal. We also have a 2 year old. I am trying to figure out healthy teaching of proper behavior while around the 2 yr old.
Also, what are good treats for reinforcement for his good behavior. We are in the USA so brand and type of treats would be helpful.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katie, I suggest downloading the free PDF E-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy, and joining a good puppy class that offers off-leash play time to help with early socialization (if an option or when an option in your city with social distancing measures). www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads The first year of pup's life, socialization, obedience, and manners will be the most important part of training. Working on things like bite inhibition via instructions from the PDF book and joining a puppy class, teaching commands like Leave It and Out for home use, and getting pup used to touch and handling - both for emotional support work later and to help with your toddler, will all be important at this age. Check out the article linked below on puppy classes: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Touch and handling desensitization: Use puppies daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Be sure to also spend time proactively teaching your toddler how to be gentle and when to leave pup alone - like while they are eating, sleeping, ect... As a mom of littles myself, it definitely pays off to work on the above with pups as puppies to help with kindness and tolerance around as adult dogs toddlers, and it can take patience and diligence to help young kids understand how to also be kind to pups in return - but it is certainly worth the work. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lulu
Chihuahua
5 Years
0 found helpful
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Lulu
Chihuahua
5 Years

Just adopted Lulu less than a week ago. Not sure but I think she was in a breeding facility and lived in a small space. She is doing pretty well except when placing her in her kennel at night. She immediately lunges, growling and trying to bite. Totally goes bezerk. I am trying to train her on a leash and when she doesn’t want to do something her first reaction is to growl and show get aggressive. She is totally food oriented so I am using lots of treats and that is helping. My question is do I make her be submissive by putting her in her back when she is being aggressive?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the cute picture of Lulu. Firstly, I can understand her reaction to the crate. I think that you have to train her as if from day one to like the crate. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. Put treats in the crate and allow Lulu to go at will and take the treats, and come back out. She has an intense aversion and you've got to let her change that. She may even think that the crate is a punishment (be sure not to put her in there as punishment.) How about setting up a pen area for her? She may feel more comfortable with this: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. As for rolling the dog over, everyone has an opinion. I am not a fan. This article may be a little over the top but has some good insight: https://respectyourdog.com/read/what-alpha-rolling-is-really-doing-to-your-dog. Good luck and enjoy Lulu!

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Leon
Chihuahua
14 Weeks
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Leon
Chihuahua
14 Weeks

We live in a town house and have given Leon his own room with a large pen. Is this acceptable? I am trying to train him and take him out every 2-3 hours...he bites and nips me a lot and whilst he responds sometimes to sit and wait it isn't very consistent. Do you have any tips? Do you think that he is upset being in his own room? Thanks Shel

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it could be that Leon does not like being away from everyone and is letting out that frustration with biting. Dogs that are teething nip but he should be beyond that now. Make sure that Leon has mentally stimulating toys to play with when alone. Also, take him out more often than every 2-3 hours - he's young and will probably pee every time you take him out if given the opportunity and this may speed up the process. Reward him verbally and with treats when he pees outside and he'll get the idea. As for the biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-5 The Socialization Method. I really think that if you interact with him more, getting him outside, he'll become friendlier. If you still have issues, consult a trainer near you to work with you and Leon together. Training classes are also a good way to form a bond between the two of you. Good luck!

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Hiro
Chihuahua
4 Months
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Hiro
Chihuahua
4 Months

My dog has a very bad habit of biting. He’s still growing his adult teeth since he’s only 4 months old, but he’ll practically bite everything - especially when playing. Our fingers, clothes, shoes & of course his toys. But it’s getting to the point where it’s becoming a concern. We took him to the grooming salon to get his nails trimmed and he bit the groomer’s hand. How should I go about break this habit and teach him thag biting is bad?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, buy Hiro specific teething toys. Keep the clothes and shoes out of his reach and when he is trying to bite, provide a diversion. You will have to start obedience training as well; look into classes near you for instruction. It is essential that you do this to ensure that Hiro is a well behaved, socialized dog. Chihuahuas can become troublesome if not properly trained. Work on his Sit, Come and Stay commands, which will come in handy for the grooming sessions. Try the Inhibition Method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-5. Lastly, ask the groomer if you can bring Hiro there for mini grooming sessions to start. Slowly, to allow him to get used to the groomer. This does not replace training though - he needs to learn that biting is not acceptable. Make sure the entire family is on board to work with Hiro. Look at the Interrupt Method, too: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-chihuahua-to-not-bite. Good luck!

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Dido
Teacup Chihuahua
3 Years
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Dido
Teacup Chihuahua
3 Years

She’s just really afraid to be alone, I worry about her a lot. She cry’s and barks when gone. She growls at a lot of noises. I love her to death. She gets scared when alone

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Talon, Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below and work on that method to get her used to you being out of the room while she is crated or exercise pen with a dog food stuffed chew toy. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate There are a couple of routes you can take with the separation anxiety. Also, work on building her independence and her confidence by adding a lot of structure and predictability into her routine. Things such as making her work for rewards like meals, walks, and pets. Working on "Stay" and "Place," distance "Down Stay" commands while you move away or leave the room, and teaching her to remain inside a crate when the door is open. Change your routine surrounding leaving so that she does not anticipate alone time and build up her anxiety before you leave - which is hard for her to deescalate from, and be sure to continue to give her something to do in the crate during the day (such as a dog food stuffed Kong to chew on). When you leave and return home, exits and entrances should be no big deal - do not make a big deal of it - you want to encourage boredom and calmness, not overly excited and emotional. When you first arrive home, if you can, ignore her for 10 minutes so that there isn't a huge build-up in her expectation of your arrival, but a calm anticipation that helps her stay calmer while waiting. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ I suggest looking into something like an Automatic treat dispensing device that can be set to detect when she is quiet and release a piece of food - those rewards can help condition her to be calmer while you are away and also give her more to do. Auto Trainer and Pet Tutor are two such devices. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Joey
Chihuahua Terrier mix
2 Years
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Joey
Chihuahua Terrier mix
2 Years

Can't get Joey to walk on a soft leash, even after obedience training. Spent 4 weeks practicing as suggested with no result.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
229 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Some dogs really struggle with loose leash walking training. I have been training for 15 years and have yet to see dogs who are natural pullers, learn to not pull without utilizing a no pull harness. I would suggest getting either a head halter called a Gentle Leader, or a no pull harness called an Easy Walk Harness.

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Chico
Chihuahua
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Chico
Chihuahua
2 Years

The dog is very aggressive and high tempered and will not listen to commands to stop attacking or barking! Has even attacked my daughter who visits please help me control our baby who is severely spoiled and is the baby of the home! He only likes certain people so is there anything I can do ?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, there is lots you can do for little Chico. Obedience training is an excellent way to turn a dog's personality around for the better. You may want to start with a private trainer who can come to the home and train Chico, giving you pointers as well, in how to help Chico behave in his home environment. The time and effort are well worth it to have a dog you can enjoy. You can also take him to obedience school -he'll become well socialized and learn to get along with other people and dogs, too, which is important. Dogs are social animals and often thrive on the environment of a class with excitement and lots going on. Have your daughter take Chico on a walk every time she comes over and this will help Chico get to know her on neutral ground where he does not feel threatened or protective of you. Also, start with teaching Chico to sit for each event. Sit before his food dish is placed in front of him, sit before getting his leash on for a walk, sit before, sit before treats, etc. This will help him gain respect for you and others. To start Chico in training before obedience classes: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-dog-basic-obedience. Good luck and all the best to Chico!

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Winston
Chihuahua
6 Months
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Winston
Chihuahua
6 Months

Winston is afraid of all people and dogs. We are constantly bringing him out but when anyone talks to him or tries to pet him his tail immediately goes between his legs and he runs away. Then when they turn he will bark and try and lunge a little. With us he is the sweetest. How do we get him more comfortable with people without traumatizing him and making it worse? We would love for him to feel relaxed around people and not so scared. What should we be doing to help him?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
229 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around new dogs, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” This technique can be applied towards humans and other dogs. Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make her concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Chi Chi
Chihuahua
3 Years
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Chi Chi
Chihuahua
3 Years

My dog is very nervous around people. She will only trust four people in the family. Even members of the family that she she’s on a regular basis are not able to go near her without Chi Chi barking at them. She will even snap at them if they go too close to her.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cedric, I suggest starting with those she knows, have people use her daily kibble as treats and toss a piece at her whenever they are in the same room with her and she is not hiding, barking, or otherwise acting aggressive or fearful. Whenever she is friendly, curious or calm in other words. Once she gets more comfortable with someone, you can also have that person give her commands she knows , like Sit, then reward for obedience to further build trust with them. Do not pet, talk sweetly to, or otherwise reward her when she is barking and acting fearful. Act calm and confident yourself instead to mirror how she should feel around the people. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mocha
Chihuahua Dauchshound
9 Months
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Mocha
Chihuahua Dauchshound
9 Months

Got him at 5 months old and he has gradually started barking at visitors non stop. We tell him to stop and he will but starts right back.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Paul, Check out the video I have linked below on Desensitizing a dog to guests. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a&index=6&t=340s Desensitize method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cookie
Chihuahua
2 Years
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Cookie
Chihuahua
2 Years

My dog becomes aggressive around new people and pets. She’s been better about allowing other members in my family pet her. However, meeting new dogs is an issue. She will growl and strike with a bite. I always try to redirect her with words such as “no” or “not nice cookie” . When i see her being more calm, i make sure to praise her for it.
What are the next steps to training her to be a bit more friendly.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aimee, I highly recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression to help you with this in person. Look for someone who comes well recommended by their clients for these types of behaviors and ideally works with a team of trainers so that various trainers can practice the training with pup as "strangers". Check out the videos linked below for one example of how this is approached. Building pup's trust and respect for you to help them feel more secure and let you handle situations that make them feel nervous is also part of the equation most likely. As well as having "strangers - i.e. trainers" practice obedience with pup eventually to further build trust and respect. Notice the line and pup on a back-tie leash so that pup can't actually get to kids to bite if they tried...This is a later stage exercise for pup. This starts with building respect and trust with you through obedience training, then practicing something like this from a distance pup can stay calm at, then gradually decreasing the distance as pup improves, until they can handle something like the below. Finally, the trainers can practice obedience with pup like Heel, Sit, Down, Come, ect.. using food rewards to build trust even more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bentley
Chihuahua
1 Year
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Bentley
Chihuahua
1 Year

Ive had Bentley since he was 8 weeks. He's been around all sizes of dogs and all sorts of people besides children. He's a happy chihuahua and super social. Doesn't growl at people or dogs. We started watching my friend's blue heeler who barks at other dogs and now Bentley does. When at the dog park he acts like he gets excited when another dog walks up to him, but then when they start sniffing he starts barking, but wags his tail at the same time, but then acts like he doesn't want them near him. He's very hot and cold at the same time. He seems like he wants to play, but then barks. How do I fix this?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
229 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Dogs typically bark out of fear. "Go away!" It worked once for them, so they continue. It sounds like he is a little uncertain. Friendly, then maybe a boundary gets crossed somehow and he starts reacting. This is a fairly easy fix as it sounds like it's not too severe, and he potentially just picked up this behavior because of the other dog. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make her concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at her (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Rex
Chihauhau
4 Years
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Rex
Chihauhau
4 Years

How do I make him smell nice and how do I make his hair shiny

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
229 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Most pet stores or online stores have pet specific shampoos and conditioners. They also make conditioning sprays which smell great! You can also start your pet on a supplement designed for their coat and skin. These contain omega fatty acids which help keep the hair shiny.

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BoBo Bear
Chihuahua / Jack Russell
20 Weeks
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BoBo Bear
Chihuahua / Jack Russell
20 Weeks

We are still having trouble with potty training

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carol, I suggest going back to the basics with him for a couple of months and act as if he isn't potty trained at all to stop all accidents from happening so that he will develop a habit of holding it consistently while in the house and wanting to keep your home clean. After a couple of months if he has been completely accident free, very gradually give him more freedom. I highly recommend crate training pup and temporarily pup should always be either tethered to you with a hands free leash or in the crate while learning, unless you know he has just peed AND pooped and you have eyes on him 100%. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 2 - 2.5 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 2/2.5 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5 hours maximum - less at first while he is getting used to it. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 2/2.5 hours while home. If he hasn't gone poop yet during that half of the day, he needs to be tethered to you or returned to the crate, then taken back outside again in 30-45 minutes if you know he likely needs to go, less frequently if he likely doesn't need to poop. Pooping outside equals more freedom. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is not already used to a crate, expect crying at first. When he cries and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give him a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help him adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. Work on teaching "Quiet" by using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Floyd
Chihuahua
4 Years
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Floyd
Chihuahua
4 Years

Floyd is a rescue. He is a good boy. I have had him for a year and he has come around a lot. He is still feisty with other dogs and it scares me because he is so small. I’m not sure how to change this behavior.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carly, I suggest seeing if there is a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area you could join. That class is for dog reactive/aggressive dogs, who are all intensively socialized with each other while wearing basket muzzles for everyone's safety, in a structured environment. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Marco
Chihuahua
2 Years
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Marco
Chihuahua
2 Years

Marco is the friendliest, sweetest chi ever, but to one of my two older dogs he charges aggressively at the most random times. My older dog Kingston is partially blind and deaf he isn’t aware of Marco until Marco is right on him. How can I get this behavior to stop.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, For this issue I recommend hiring a professional trainer who will come to your home to work with you in person. Look for someone who specializes in behavior issues like aggression. This will likely involve a combination of building Marco's respect for you along with teaching some directional commands, like Leave It and Place, so Marco allows you to mediate their interactions and doesn't try to control your older dog's behavior. As well as desensitizing Marco to the things about your older dog that Marco seems to feel are not okay - probably things about their body language and movement that have changed due to their impaired vision, but it could also be Marco resource guarding around your older dog or something else going on - having the trainer observe their interactions in person should help determine what's setting Marco off so you can work with that. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chili
Chihuahua
7 Months
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Chili
Chihuahua
7 Months

Aggressive, not potty trained, not socialized despite my effort, not well behaved, barks at everyone...

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ghita, Because of pup's aggression, I would pursue hiring a trainer who specializes in behavior issues, comes well recommended by their previous clients, and work with a team of trainers who can practice exposing pup to various people. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) or freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-7 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. You want him to get into the habit of holder his bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever he feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is not already used to a crate, expect crying at first. When he cries and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give him a dog food stuffed hollow chew toy to help him adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If he continues protesting for long periods of time past 3-5 days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If he disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at his side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If he stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. For the general barking, check out the Quiet method mentioned above as well for that, and the Desensitize method I have linked and the video series on barking below. Desensitize method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Barking videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Chiweenie
11 Weeks
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Luna
Chiweenie
11 Weeks

So I got my dog around five weeks which was really early on and I realize that now. I’ve done everything I can to protect her. It’s just my boyfriend and I and my apartment no other animals I also tutor so I’m out from Wednesday to Friday but I took her with me and I also take her everywhere I go even though she’s unprotected but she’s never on the ground she’s always in my hands or in her doggy bag. I’m just worried because she’s missing out on so much interaction I don’t want to be too late. She has incessantly biting habit with fingers which is hard to get her off. We just barely got her first shots and we still have to wait for three, before she can interact with any dogs what do I do in the meantime just because I don’t want her to miss out on opportunities to be with animals should I take her to work with me should I keep her home from now on should I be doing anything also she was really good at potty training but then some how fell from that. We’re very persistent and have lots of patients but somehow she still is not understanding where she needs to poop and P she’s had multiple accidents but yet has proved us wrong. What do you think?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lunas, I am not a vet nor can I tell you what risks to take or not take with your pup, but I can refer you to the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior's position on socialization before shots are fully completed at this link. https://avsab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Puppy_Socialization_Position_Statement_Download_-_10-3-14.pdf Know that there are also ways to make socialization safer by carrying pup places (like you are doing), having play dates with other puppies who are up to date on their shots, and choosing areas to let pup on the ground where other animals are less likely to have walked. Places like friend's homes, whose animals are up to date on shots, puppy classes where the instructor takes precautions like cleaning the floor with a cleaner that kills parvo and distemper right before class, requiring every dog to be current on shots, and keeps non-class participants out of the area, and choosing places to walk carefully, particularly to avoid where non-vaccinated dogs may have gone to the bathroom. I would speak with your vet about how the sequence of vaccines provide protection. Even though they are given in a series, the correlation between what age each vaccine series is given and when pup's maternal anti-bodies wear off have a large effect on how protective each vaccine is. Even if pup is not fully vaccinated, once they have received at least one of their vaccines series after an age where mom's anti-body protection has worn off, they may still be protected. I am not a vet however, and my details may be wrong, so I highly recommend asking your vet for clarity on how the vaccines protect and what the correlation for protection, age the vaccine is received, and mom's anti-bodies wearing off or interfering with possible vaccines effectiveness affects your dog and their ability to socialize more. For the potty training, you may need to switch to a different method at this age. Check out the article I have linked below and the Crate Training and Tethering methods found there. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bella
Chorkie
2 Years
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Bella
Chorkie
2 Years

My Bella is very aggressive to my husband every time he tries to touch me Bella runs at him and attacks him. Sometimes if he looks at me she growels. I don’t know how to handle this situation can you help?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
878 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, It sounds like pup is being possessive of you, which is a bit different than protective. Possessive is a form of resource guarding, where pup is acting like they own the person they are guarding. It's generally related to a lack of respect. Since this involves both you and your husband I suggest you both work on building pup's respect for you. I also recommend introducing pup to wearing a basket muzzle and temporarily having pup wear a basket muzzle and drag leash while you are both home, so that when pup behaves aggressively, you can calmly pick up the end of the leash and make pup leave the room. This should be done with a calm and confident attitude - when you tell pup to do something, you mean what you say, but you are calm when enforcing it. No body should react angrily or by petting and soothing pup - angry can encourage a defensive fear response, and petting and soothing pup when they behave that way rewards the aggressive behavior - simply pick up the end of the leash and lead pup out of the room and keep them from returning until they are willing to do a couple commands like Sit and Down and return with your permission. Don't allow pup to be pushy at other times either. No standing on laps, climbing onto you uninvited, nudging or barking for attention or food, ect...Anytime pup wants something, even petting, command pup to do something like Down first before giving it to them - have them work for everything they get right now. Follow the Working and Consistency methods https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Commands that are good for respect building - Out, Leave It and Off are especially important for giving pup directions right now. Place, Down and Heel are especially good for respect building. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Off- section on The Off command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-train-dog-stay-off-couch/ If this tends to happen on the bed, pup also looses bed privileges right now. Pup should sleep in another room or crate until pup no longer acts possessive at all. To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when she is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward her with a piece of kibble every time she touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed her his whole meal this way. Practice this until she is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that she has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As she gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that she has to poke her face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until she is comfortable having her face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while she holds her face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until she can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when she can hold her face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while her face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed her a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until she is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while she is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As she gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long she wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give her a treat, until she can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s If things don't improve, they get worse, you are worried about a bite (the muzzle is important here), or you feel overwhelmed, I would not hesitate to hire a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and will come to your home, to help you in person with this. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jimmy
Chihuahua
2 Years
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Jimmy
Chihuahua
2 Years

My chorkie is lovely to all his family members but sometimes he will snap for no reason such as someone can take him on a walk give him treats feed him etc but he is very territorial and as soon as they come towards me he will snarl and even bite people that he actually likes. How do I stop him being so protective of me?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
229 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around strangers/new people, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” The tips below can be applied to both humans and dogs, or anything else your dog may encounter that he is reactive to. Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at strangers to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear people because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make his concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate people with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming person means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view other people. As the person comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the person causes meat to fall from the sky. When the person is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that people near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram his opinions of other people. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time someone comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees someone, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening person and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at her (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see someone approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see someone, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with someone. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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