How to Train Your Dog to Use a Gentle Leader

Easy
1-5 Days
General

Introduction

Are you plagued by a pulling pooch?

Tugging on the lead and refusing to walk to heel are common problems that most pet parents are familiar with. The dog that lunges forward turns a pleasant stroll into a battle of wills and can ruin an otherwise relaxing walk. But worse than this, a strong dog can pull an owner over or become dangerously out of control.

What's to be done?

There is no shortage of training aids that are said to cure pulling. However, most of these rely on inflicting pain or discomfort on the dog, such as prong collars, choke chains, or electric collars. For those wanting a healthy, happy relationship with their pet pal then ruling through fear is not an acceptable option.

Defining Tasks

Enter Prof Robert Anderson and dog trainer Ruth Foster. They devised the Gentle Leader (™) as a humane way to guide and control strong dogs. It works in two ways: by utilizing pressure points on the neck and nose that have a calming effect, and by turning the dog's head up towards the owner.

The Gentle Leader is a headcollar that fit snugly around the neck and muzzle. It is equally suitable for pups and adults, although the dog does require to have a snout, so is not suitable for flat-faced breeds such as pugs.

Getting Started

When leash walking while wearing a Gentle Leader, the dog pulls and his head is turned up and backwards, discouraging him from surging further ahead. 

As with any new collar, some dogs may take a while to get used to wearing the leader. It's not usual to paw or rub at the halter in an attempt to remove it. Simply distract the dog, perhaps even walking briskly forward and encouraging the dog to follow, then give him treats for obeying.

Key to successful training with a Gentle Leader (™) is to use positive, reward-based training methods and only to use gentle pressure on the lead. Never tug, snatch, or pull hard on the lead as this will frighten and confuse the dog and possibly even injure him.

The Stop Pulling Method

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2 Votes
Stop Pulling method for Use a Gentle Leader
Step
1
Walk forward
Walk your dog on a leash with the slack taken up.
Step
2
Hold tension
When the dog pulls ahead, maintain tension on the lead. The dog's head now turns towards you, restricting the forward surge.
Step
3
Loosen tension
Once he slows his pace, slacken the tension on the lead. This helps him understand that the absence of pulling returns his head to a more natural position.
Step
4
Reward!
Once walking beside you, praise the dog and reward him.
Step
5
Be proactive
Learn to anticipate when the dog is about to surge ahead. For example, once his shoulder passes your leg, apply gentle tension on the leash to raise and turn his head.
Step
6
Reward!
As soon as he falls back into stride, release the tension and praise him.
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The Walk-to-Heel Method

Effective
2 Votes
Walk-to-Heel method for Use a Gentle Leader
Step
1
Choose a side
Decide which side you want the dog to walk to heel, and stick with this side.
Step
2
Walk forward
Hold the leash with a small amount of slack in it. Walk forward and encourage the dog to follow. If he hangs back, encourage him with a treat.
Step
3
Lure as needed
If he still doesn't move forward, apply gentle pressure to the leash while luring him with the treat. As he moves off, release the tension on the leash and praise him.
Step
4
Introduce command and praise
Once by your ankle, give your cue command, e.g. "Heel" and praise him as he walks. If he surges ahead, follow the method to stop pulling.
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The Perfect Fit Method

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1 Vote
Perfect Fit method for Use a Gentle Leader
Step
1
Size correctly
The Gentle Leader comes in small, medium, and large sizes. Select the most appropriate option for your dog.
Step
2
Adjust the headcollar to your dog's size
- To do this, fit the neck strap and alter the size so that it is a snug but not too tight. Aim to fit one finger between the strap and the neck. - Remove the neck strap by opening the clip. - Now slide the nose loop over the dog's muzzle and clip the neck strap into place. - Adjust the sliding clamp up under the dog's chin. When correctly placed, the nose and neck strap should come together in a 'V' rather than an 'L'.
Step
3
Celebrate!
The dog is now wearing the Gentle Leader. Give him lots of praise.
Step
4
Start walking
Clip the leash onto the control ring and away you go!
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Roxie
German Shepherd
11 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Roxie
German Shepherd
11 Months

Roxie is very strong and several training methods have not been successful in stopping her from pulling on her leash. We recently hired a trainer who uses a gentle leader. We are trying to walk her twice a day but even with the leader it's a challenge. Pulling back does not turn her head and she continues to pull ahead. What are we doing wrong?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Pamela, Without seeing how the Gentle Leader has been put on and how you are using it, I cannot answer your question accurately. I suggest looking up some how-to YouTube videos on how to fit and properly use a Gentle Leader. It sounds like the strap below the chin could be fitted wrong or the entire Halter put on backwards -- so that the chin strap is at the back of her head. Also, make sure that when you pull back on the gentle leader you are pulling the leash toward you, to the side, not straight back. When a rider steers a horse, she often will let go of one side of the reigns so that the reigns pull on just one side of the horse -- turning the head toward that side of the reigns. If the riding pulls both reigns straight back at the same time, the horse will stop. If the leader is put on correctly and you are using it as shown in how-to-videos, then the issue is probably training in combination with the gentle leader. A gentle leader is a tool. It is designed to level the playing field so that your dog CANNOT over-power you while walking him. It will not train her by itself. Ultimately, if you took the gentle leader off she would probably be down the street, not-looking back. Her focus would not be on you. Her brain needs to be engaged as well as her body. She needs to learn through practicing turns and changes of speed OFTEN how to cooperate with the gentle leader and pay attention to you. I am an advocate of using tools because sometimes they are needed, even for safety, but training that engages your dog's brain also needs to be practiced while your dog is using the device. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Turns" method while she is wearing the gentle leader. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Jack
lab
16 Months
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Question
0 found helpful
Jack
lab
16 Months

Jack is a very strong dog having a hard time walking and restraining him when he want to go after something how long would this take to train as i work out of town and only have one day off during the week

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Doug, Used correctly you should see a small amount of difference in the pulling during the first four walks. After the first four walks, the Gentle Leader should improve the pulling a little bit more every time that you use it as long as you are following a training method also, to teach him how to avoid the corrections and where to walk. Teaching Jack to pull without having to use the Gentle Leader will take much longer however. Typically that would take around four months to train, with walks happening at least three times per week. If you are only taking him once per week, then it might take as long as one year to not need the Gentle Leader anymore. To speed up the training you might want to look into hiring a trainer who will teach your pup to "Heel" while you are at work. Some trainers will do Day Training, where they will come to your home and train the dog while you are away. Hiring a trainer to come at least two times per week, in addition to your one session with your pup, would significantly speed up the training process. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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