How to Train Your Dog to Make an Emergency Stop

Medium
3-12 Weeks
General

Introduction

Have you taught your dog how to stop dead in his tracks in the event of an emergency? What would you do if your dog was just about to run into a busy street? Maybe he has seen a deer or another dog and has started to chase after him. In all of these situations, your dog is at risk of serious injury or worse if you can't get him under control – and do so very quickly. The idea is for you to be able to make your dog stop and drop instantly, using a single verbal command or hand signal at any time, no matter what he is doing.

Defining Tasks

The command is basically the same as drop on recall, you could use "Drop" or "Stop" and a single down sweeping motion of your hand. It really doesn't matter as long as you teach your dog that he must drop instantly the moment he sees or hears the command. He doesn't even need to know why, just that he must obey immediately. This is a very important command as it could very easily save him from being badly injured, dying, or getting lost.

Training your dog to emergency stop is no more difficult than teaching him to drop on recall. But it will take time and patience, and a large supply of his favorite treats. You can teach a dog of any age this very important command, but it may take longer with younger pups as they are a little more wound up. But if you have already taught your dog to drop on recall, it will go much easier. Remember to give your dog plenty of praise and treats when he gets it right and never punish him when he gets it wrong.

Getting Started

Teaching your dog to "emergency stop" is a vital skill and one command you need to make sure he knows and will obey without question. To train him properly, you need a plentiful supply of his favorite treats, a great attitude, and plenty of patience. The best place to start training your dog is an open space with very little in the way of distractions such as children playing, other dogs, traffic, and the like. You can add in these distractions once your pup has learned to obey your command without question. Remember, it is just as important for him to obey your verbal commands as it is for him to obey a gesture since he may not always be able to hear you.

The Assistant Method

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2 Votes
Assistant method for Make an Emergency Stop
Step
1
Wait
Tell your dog to sit and have an assistant hold him in place giving the command "Wait".
Step
2
Get some distance
Walk away to a distance of approximately 20 to 30 feet then turn and face your pup without making eye contact (If you make eye contact he may run to you).
Step
3
Call
When you are ready, call him to you.
Step
4
Introduce command
As soon as he starts moving, step towards him and give him your choice of commands both verbal and hand gestures (most people use the typical police hand signal for Halt). The mere fact you are coming towards him will make him hesitate (this is a normal reaction).
Step
5
Increase distance
Once he has learned to stop on command, you can start extending the distance until he will stop and drop at any distance no matter which of the commands you use.
Recommend training method?

The Treats Method

Effective
2 Votes
Treats method for Make an Emergency Stop
Step
1
Sit
Start with your dog in the sit-stay position.
Step
2
Treat!
Now start tossing treats towards him and let him chase them down. The idea is that he associates your hand being in the Halt position is accompanied with treats being thrown his way!
Step
3
Introduce command
Now that he has become used to seeing this, once he has retrieved the treat give the "Down" command. He should obey immediately in anticipation of another treat being tossed his way.
Step
4
Increase distance
You can vary the distance between you and your dog, stretching it out over time.
Step
5
Practice
Once he is used to your hand signal being accompanied by the "Down" command, he will learn to obey without the need for treats.
Recommend training method?

The Long Lead Method

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1 Vote
Long Lead method for Make an Emergency Stop
Step
1
Walk on lead
Attach your dog to the long line and start taking walks with him.
Step
2
Add command
As you are walking along, suddenly give him the "Down" command. Each time he obeys it, reward him with a treat and plenty of praise.
Step
3
From sitting
Transition to having your dog sit on the long lead while you walk away. Call him to you and command him to "Drop".
Step
4
Increase distance
Each time he does, give him a treat and extend the distance. In time, you should be able to take him off the lead and repeat the process.
Step
5
Practice!
If he doesn't obey the commands after being taken off the long lead, put him back on it and start over again. It may take several attempts over a period of time, but in time he will learn to obey.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Ella
Staff cross/ jack russell
17 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ella
Staff cross/ jack russell
17 Months

When we meet other dogs she becomes aggressive and pulls violently

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
128 Dog owners recommended

Hello Pat, You need to hire a professional dog trainer with a great reputation working with aggressive dogs to help you. Also, look for a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area. This is a class where all of the dogs wear a comfortable muzzle and are socialized together in an intensive class, where the aggression can be dealt with in real time. These classes are for dogs that are aggressive or leash reactive, meaning they are fine when off leash, but who have never done serious damage to another dog yet. There could be a number of things going on causing the aggression and a professional trainer needs to evaluate what is going on in person to help you deal with the aggression. Fear aggression, leash reactivity, dominance based aggression, and genetic aggression are often dealt with differently than one another. Some of the training is the same across the board but there are very specific things that need to be done for each. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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