How to Train Your Dog to Not Lick

Medium
4-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

The behavior of a dog licking is very natural. When they are puppies, dogs are licked by their mothers to encourage movement, to show love, to keep them clean, and to provide affection. Dogs grow up using their mouths to explore the world. If your dog licks your face as he greets you, it is because he is saying hello in the way that is most natural to him. Your skin is soft and smooth, which is comforting for your dog. Your skin may even taste salty and yummy for your dog, as much as it may be annoying to people.

Defining Tasks

Dogs also naturally lick their own wounds to encourage the healing process. Dogs will lick their paws excessively or their skin excessively to groom, clean, and to feel better. Excessive licking can not only be annoying to watch and hear, but it can also pose problems on your dog's skin. Licking wounds could cause potential bacterial infections or even pull stitches out if your dog has had recent surgery. Licking a paw excessively could indicate an injury you may know nothing about. At the same time, obsessively licking an injury could cause more damage.

Once you know your dog is safe, not injured, and only licking because of habit, you may want to begin to correct compulsive licking.

Getting Started

To ensure your dog is not licking his body excessively for medical reasons, be sure to have your dog evaluated by your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can check for things such as hay fever and allergy-related skin conditions. You can also talk about obsessive-compulsive disorders such as stress and separation anxiety.

Once your dog is cleared medically, if he is licking you to provide sweet puppy kisses or licking his body simply as a compulsive behavior you can address these problems with some retraining, positive reinforcement, patience, and lots of treats. Licking is a habit that takes time to forget. It might take your dog several weeks to forget this bad habit and replace it with a new habit.

The Kisses Greeting Method

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Kisses Greeting method for Not Lick
Step
1
Turn away
If your dog is used to licking you as a greeting, turn your face away to encourage the dog not to lick your face.
Step
2
Reward
The moment your dog's tongue is withdrawn and away from your face, offer him a treat and attention by way of petting.
Step
3
Offer alternatives
You can train your dog alternative ways of greeting such as the “give me your paw” command or a “sit” command, so you have a chance to pet and greet your dog without being licked in the face.
Step
4
Practice and reward
As you are training these commands, turn your head away from your dog's face any time he tries to lick you. Once your dog pulls his tongue in and away from your face, give him a treat and some affection by way of petting.
Step
5
Reinforce
Over time, your dog will be used to an alternative greeting such as remaining calm with his tongue in his mouth or sitting and waiting for a good petting from you.
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The Give Paw Method

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0 Votes
Give Paw method for Not Lick
Step
1
Sit
Ask your dog to sit and offer a treat when he obeys. If your dog does not sit immediately, go back and revisit this command with your dog so every time you say the command, “sit,” he knows what to do.
Step
2
Introduce a treat
Holding a treat in one closed hand show it to your dog but don't allow him to eat it.
Step
3
Introduce command
Give the command, “give me your paw,” and wave the treat in your closed hand under your dog's nose.
Step
4
Wait
Wait patiently for your dog to paw at your hand trying to get to the treat inside your closed fist. Your dog may sniff your hand, but stand firm and wait for that paw to come up to try to open your hand to release the treat.
Step
5
Reward
Once the paw comes up and touches your hands to release the treat, tell him good boy, open your hand, and allow him to eat his reward.
Step
6
Practice
Practice this several times until you can have an open hand with a treat sitting on top, and when you say the command, “give me your paw,” your dog touches your hand with his paw before eating his treat. This training may take several days several times a day to practice, but eventually when you say the command, “give me your paw.” your dog should put his paw up in your hand before expecting a treat reward
Step
7
Add the alternative to your greeting
As part of the greeting process, before you allow your dog to lick your face to say hello, put your hand out and use the “give me your paw” command. Once your dog comprehends the command, use this as a greeting every time you see your dog to avoid the puppy kisses.
Step
8
Get support
Ask anyone who greets your dog not to allow puppy kisses and face licking but rather to ask your dog to give them his paw as a greeting. Once your dog has been trained to use shaking your hand as a normal greeting, he will expect everyone who crosses his path to shake instead of offering sloppy wet puppy kisses.
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The Distraction Method

Effective
0 Votes
Distraction method for Not Lick
Step
1
Retraining
If your dog is always licking his own body, you will need to begin to retrain and provide distractions.
Step
2
Offer alternatives
When you see your dog licking his paws incessantly, for instance, offer him a toy to chew.
Step
3
Encourage
While your dog chews on his toy, offer him a petting and a treat for every few minutes he is not licking his body.
Step
4
Repeat and reward
Repeat this process every time you see your dog licking obsessively. Be sure to reward good behavior with treats when he pulls away from licking his paws or other areas on his body.
Step
5
Reinforce
Eventually, your dog will find entertainment elsewhere, such as a toy, and recognize the reward in treats when he is not licking obsessively.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Oliver
Golden Retriever
6 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Oliver
Golden Retriever
6 Years

Sit

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
32 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jon, It looks like you wrote sit under your question. Are you asking how to teach your Golden Retriever to sit? If so then you can teach Oliver to sit by following these steps. 1. Begin by finding something that your dog loves, to use as motivation. This can be a favorite treat or a favorite toy. 2. Once you have found something that Oliver loves, start by letting him sniff the item. Once Oliver is paying attention to the item, bring the item slowly from the dogs nose towards the dogs back, making it pass over the dogs head with him trying to follow the item with his eyes and nose. 3. If the dog looses focus on the item or gets excited and tries to grab it, simply start over by placing the item back at the dog's nose and repeat the process. 4. When the dog attempts to keep focus on the item by lifting its head up and back, this should cause the dog to move into a sit position, with its bottom hitting the floor. Once the dog's bottom hits the floor, praise the dog enthusiastically and immediately give the dog the item as a reward. 5. Practice luring the dog into that position several times without a command, until the dog begins to place it's bottom on the floor more quickly. 6. Once the dog is placing it's bottom on the floor when you move the item above it's head right away, introduce the word "sit", saying sit right when the dog's bottom begins to lower towards the ground and praising and rewarding as soon as it touches. 7. After several repetitions of "sit", begin to tell your dog "sit" right BEFORE you lure them into the position, so that the command precedes the action now. Continue to reward and praise when they sit. 8. Begin to give your dog opportunities to sit when told,without being shown what to do now. To do this tell Oliver "sit" and wait seven seconds to see if he will offer it himself without being shown, if he does not, then lure him into the position with the item again as a hint. Do not repeat the word" si"t unless more than 7 seconds has passed or you think the dog did not hear your original command. 9. Once Oliver will sit without the hint when told, begin to faze out the use of the treats or toy by only offering the item after your dog has a done a number of sits or a sit that was better than the previous sit. For instance have the dog sit three times before earning the reward one day, then the next day have the dog do five sits before earning a reward. Then ten sits before earning a reward by the end of the week. After your dog reaches more than fifteen sits per reward faze out the rewards all together and use every day "life rewards" instead. These can be sitting at the door before a walk, sitting at dinner before being fed, sitting before being petted, and other things that your dog enjoys throughout its day. If you struggle to get your dog to sit when luring with the item try practicing the above with your dog in a corner or against a wall so that the only way that the dog can follow the treat visually is by sitting to help him look up. This can also be good for dogs who try to back up when doing this excercise. Enjoy practicing sit! Thank you, Caitlin Crittenden

Yes how do you teach your dog to sit?

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