How to Train Your Dog to Behave in Public

Medium
2-8 Weeks
General

Introduction

Does it matter what people think about your dog's behavior?

You should care, because when out in public your dog is an ambassador for canine-kind. If he behaves badly by lunging at strangers, jumping up, or barking, this is unpleasant and intimidating for others. However, a well-behaved dog that walks nicely to heel and sits politely to greet people is a positive pleasure.

A dog that behaves in public means you can relax and enjoy walks, rather than be on edge all the time in anticipation of problems. Remember, the dog and his behavior are your responsibility, both in moral terms and in the eyes of the law. Should your dog jump up at a senior citizen, knocking them over so that they fracture a hip, then you could well be liable for their surgical expenses.

Defining Tasks

To behave well in public means having the dog under control at all times, both on and off the leash. This skill doesn't happen by magic but by putting in the time with regular obedience training. Even a basic command such as "Sit", along with walking to heel, equip the dog with a great grounding so that he is able to meet and greet strangers without showing you up.

Training both puppies and adult dogs does require time, persistence, and patience. For the puppies, the world is a big exciting place full of new sights, sounds, and smells, so distraction is rife. For the adult dog, they may have deeply ingrained bad habits that need to be replaced with new good behavior.

For both young and old, be sure to use reward-based training methods. This rewards the dog's good behavior, which sets them on the path to thinking about what they need to do to please you and earn a reward. Old-fashioned methods based on dominating the dog are outdated because they use intimidation and punishment to cow the dog into obeying. Not a happy scenario!

Getting Started

Basic obedience training requires little other than:

  • A collar and leash to restrain the dog

  • Bite-sized tasty treats to use as a reward

  • A bag that clips onto your belt, in which to keep the treats handy

  • Time, patience, and consistency

Train your dog a couple of times a day for 10 to 15 minutes. You can also incorporate training into your walks, such as getting the dog to sit curbside. However, be sure to make training fun and always end on a high with a command the dog knows and can do well. This helps build self-confidence and enthusiasm for the next session.

The Walk to Heel Method

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Step
1
Start without distractions
Train in a backyard with few distractions. Have the dog on a collar and lead. Walk forward. If the dog surges ahead, stop immediately.
Step
2
Wait for a "sit"
Now ignore the dog and wait for him to sit. Once he sits, reward him with a treat. The idea is that the dog learns he is to stop when you stop.
Step
3
Stop when he surges ahead
Walk on again. If the dog walks nicely on a slack lead, praise him and toss a treat. If he surges ahead, stop and wait for the sit. Then reward the sit, and start off again.
Step
4
Label the "heel"
Your dog now has two choices, he can walk by your side and be rewarded, or if he surges ahead you stop and he has to sit and wait. Either way you are in control. When you move off and he heels, say "Heel" is a firm but happy voice, and reward him.
Step
5
Build the behavior
With the dog now listening to you and watching for treats as he heels, start extending the amount of time he is expected to heel before he gets a treat. By making him travel further each time, he will eventually start to heel automatically. And if he surges ahead, you simply stop, meaning that he gets nowhere fast and finds it more rewarding to behave.
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The Not Jump Up Method

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0 Votes
Step
1
Know jumping is self-rewarding
When a dog jumps up, he rewards himself, therefore you must prevent jumping up so that it doesn't become a habit. If you can see a flashpoint, such as a friend approaching, have the dog sit and "Look" at you.
Step
2
Restrain the dog
Other strategies include stepping on the dog's lead so that it is too short for the dog to jump up. This may feel rather a negative thing to do, but know you are preventing the dog learning bad behavior.
Step
3
Withdraw attention
If your dog jumps up when you come home, ignore the dog and walk off to a different room. Return, and only acknowledge the dog once he is calm with all four paws on the floor. Then make a big fuss of him. The lesson is that jumping up means no attention, while sitting or standing nicely means a fuss.
Step
4
Practice with friends
Now practice the dog greeting friends. Perhaps do this outside and tie the dog to an immovable object such as a tree. Have the friend approach but stop and walk away as soon as the dog goes to jump. The friend only continues once the dog is calm with four-on-the-floor.
Step
5
Teach an alternative behavior
Jumping up is an action, but so is sitting, standing, lying, or 'Look'. Decide on an alternative action you want the dog to perform in order to be greeted and work on this. For example, tell the dog "Sit" and only fuss him when he is in a sit.
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The Sit on Command Method

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Step
1
Get his attention
Hold a treat between your finger and thumb, just in front of the dog's nose so that it holds his attention.
Step
2
Raise the treat in the air
Use the treat as a lure, moving it slowly so that the dog follows it with his nose. Raise the treat is an arc over and behind the dog's head. As he follows the treat, as his head goes up and back, his butt will drop to the floor.
Step
3
Label this "sit"
As soon as his butt hits the deck, say "Sit" in a firm but excited voice, and reward him with the treat.
Step
4
Try without the treat
Practice with the treat until he starts to anticipate and sits as he starts to see your hand move. Now, start phasing out the treat, perhaps rewarding him for every second, then every third sit, rather than each time.
Step
5
Take your training outside
Now practice in different places and with distractions until he responds regardless of what's going on and has a rock-solid sit.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Amy Caldwell

Published: 10/06/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Nugget
Australian Kelpie
11 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Nugget
Australian Kelpie
11 Months

Hello, I have been trying to train my dog not to jump on people for months now and nothing is working. I have tried the ignore and the one where she will have to sit for a stranger to get attention but, its only getting worse.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lily, Check out the article linked below and the Step Toward method, and the Leash method with guests. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump If pup has any issues with aggression I also suggest hiring a professional trainer to help you in person with this, instead of doing this on your own, for safety reasons. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Season
Australian Shepher Samoyed mix
1 Year
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Season
Australian Shepher Samoyed mix
1 Year

Hello,
I have been doing a lot of leash training lately. My dog walks very nicely on a leash now around most distractions and if she gets distracted, I can always get her attention back on me using treats and a look at me command or a sit. However, if another person joints us on a walk she gets very excited and behaves as if we have never done any leash training. I have to stop every few steps because she is pulling, and I wait for her to come back into position (next to me) and to look at me before I continue, but there is no improvement whatsover throughout the walk.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jil, That's wonderful that you have made progress with leash walking in general. I have found when training, that many dogs actually have the hardest time heeling when walking with an additional person or other dog (even from the same family). Many dogs either compete to be in front, get focused on keeping everyone together, or simply get excited about the group, and seem to forget training and pull a lot when you add another person or dog to the walk. This can be even more difficult than passing other dogs! Treat this like a high level distraction that you have to practice around (like you probably had to do around other walkers and when passing dogs in the past while training). Recruit a friend or family member to go on a walk regularly with you just for the purpose of training. You can also look for a dog walking group somewhere like www.meetup.com, a local obedience club, rescue group, or online if you do not have friends who can help with this. Walk with a couple of feet between you and the other person help you (so that you don't bump into them when you do what I am about to mention). As soon as Season starts to pull ahead, cut directly in front of her at a ninety degree angle, then turn another ninety degrees again so that you end up walking in the opposite direction as your friend. To get back with your friend you can cut two more times, to make a complete box with your turns, so that you are walking in the same direction as your friend again. Instruct your friend to slow down whenever you do this so that you can catch back up with your dog in a few minutes. Make this a training walk. Do not have the goal be the walking itself, so that you can focus on your dog and turn in front of her as many times as you have to to teach her to focus on you again, without feeling frustrated about not getting very far distance wise! Choose a patient friend or family member to help with this since the walk will be rather awkward at first. Expect this to take a lot of practice, and not to be something resolved in two walks. Try not to get discouraged but instead notice small improvements. Doing this training simply teaches her that she still has to pay attention to you and follow you during the walk, rather than focusing on your friend or getting overly excited. Turning directly in front of her teaches spacial awareness (you may bump into her a bit and that's alright if she is generally a confident and non-aggressive dog). The more you practice this the better she should learn to pay attention to where you are and what you are doing though. Be sure to turn in front of her as soon as her head starts to move past your leg. If you turn too late it will be hard to do. If she gets so far ahead that you cannot turn in front of her, then turn 180 degrees , the other direction, so that you end up walking in the opposite direction as your friend. Walk that direction until she is paying attention to you again, then turn back toward your friend's direction to continue walking with your friend. Check out the "Turns" method from the article below for more detail on how to utilize turns and changes in speed to teach Heeling: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sky
Silky Terrier
1 Year
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Sky
Silky Terrier
1 Year

How do I teach my dog to stop barking at people and other dogs when in public. Would really love to bring her to a mall where pets are allowed, but the last time i brought her there she got very aggressive and loud. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kat, If the barking is related to aggression or fear you need to deal with the underlying cause as well. First, I would work on building her respect and trust for you so that she is depending on you to handle situations she is uncomfortable with instead of trying to control things herself - i.e. barking to keep people away and express her dislike: Respect and trust: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo If fearful you can also work on building confidence in general: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHKgNY5QZTk Help her overcome her fear of strangers through counter conditioning and interrupting bad mindset at the same time through People Aggression protocol video- notice the back tie for safety (your guest should never be put at risk. Only train with the correct safety protocols to keep everyone involved safe. https://youtu.be/mgmRRYK1Z6A Structured focused heel - interrupting first signs of aggression and reactivity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfiDe0GNnLQ Barking dog - other tools like the above video could be used instead of the collar, but notice the timing of corrections and how to barking is interrupted - use of structure, heel, calmness, timely corrections, and calm rewards: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/good-dog-transformations/how-we-work-through-leash-reactivity-with-the-wild-and-crazy-ozzie-2nd-session/ Later counter conditioning protocol to help with human aggression-possible fear issues, once he can handle training with more distance between he and people, and is ready for up close training - notice the back tie leash to avoid people being bitten still: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jeff
Greyhound
12 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Jeff
Greyhound
12 Years

he barks and snarls at everyone except me

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sam, I highly suggest hiring a professional private trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues. Look for someone who is well recommended by their previous clients - who also dealt with aggression. You can also check out Shean O'Shea from the Good Dog, Thomas from the Canine Educator, and Jeff Gellman - all on YouTube with their own YouTube channels, to learn more about aggression. Having someone with access to a larger training staff to practice the training around "strangers" safely is also super important. How much of the training you can do on your own depends partially on whether the snarling is aggression or reactivity - would pup bite if approached or handled or is pup just aroused and nervous but fine once close (if you don't already know the answer, don't test this without professional help for safety reasons). Also, how long has this been going on? If that has always been the case then I would treat it like normal aggression. If this is recent but not related to something traumatic or new happening to pup, you may need to visit your vet to see if pup is sick, in pain, or things are changing mentally or hormonally - because of his age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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roxy
Doberman Pinscher
2 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
roxy
Doberman Pinscher
2 Years

i want to take her to my school as an ESA but i dont want her to jump on people or get too excited also bark

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alison, To help Roxy get used to being around a lot of people but also to learn not jump on people, follow one of the methods in the training article bellow, and be sure to bring her around a lot of people to practice. Choose people who you either know or who will agree to help you teach her when you explain what you are doing. Here is the article link for teaching a dog not to jump: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump You can also work on the barking by teaching her to be calm and by teaching her the quiet command. To teach her the "Quiet" command use "The Barking on Command Method" found in the article linked bellow. To teach her to be calm around people use "The Desensitize Method" from that same article: I recommend either using "The Desensitize Method" or using both methods. https://wagwalking.com/training/be-quiet Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Cooper
Golden Retriever
2 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Cooper
Golden Retriever
2 Years

He is typically very well trained and behaves well around the house and the typical visitors. But, that all goes out the window when is in public with large groups of people. He gets extremely energetic as Goldens do, and he won’t calm down with anything. He drags you on the leash, wants to run around, and simply won’t listen to commands. I’m familiar with the aspect of making sure he has regular exercise in his routine (being that he’s an energetic dog breed), but nothing seems to help when he goes out in public places. Please help with any training advice!!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Savannah, A lot of is it practice, but a few other things can also help: a structured heel with some gentle discipline and boundaries: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcwvUOf5oOg Place and Down-Stays for long-periods of time at home, then shorter periods of time around distractions in public: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Generally working on building respect and trust for you through obedience at home before you go places so that listening is easier for him in public: Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Working method and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Out - leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ It can be hard to do, but keeping your attitude calm and confident, and not angry, overly-excited, or nervous can also help him. A no-none-sense, tell him what to do, then expect him to do it and work him through it if needed attitude can make a difference in how you train in a good way. Also, it's super important to start your walk to public places really structured, with pup slightly behind you and focused on where you are going and not scanning the horizon to look at everything else. How you start the walk and whether he is tuned into you at the beginning can make a big difference in how he responds when exciting things come across his path. If he seems nervous and isn't responding to you due to fear instead of over-excitement, then spending a lot of calm time on the outskirts of public places practicing things like Place is important to deal with the root issue or nervousness around crowds. You can give treats for relaxed body language and obedience around crowds in that setting, be he probably won't take food until he is doing better because most dogs won't eat while stressed..so food would come later in the process. A large intermediate obedience class with a trainer who also trains at an off-leash level after intermediate (which shows skill level of trainer a bit), and comes well recommended by other clients, and trains in a way that makes sense to you, can also be a great way to practice obedience around distractions. Some groups like meetup.com also have dog walking or hiking groups that can be large enough and dog friendly enough to be able to practice with understanding folks regularly. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ruby
Mutt
5 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ruby
Mutt
5 Years

Ruby is very sweet when around just me, but any time it’s someone she doesn’t know, she is scared of them and seeks comfort behind me. Also, she seems to be a little aggressive towards other dogs that are strangers. This makes it difficult for vet trips and I avoid taking her out in public to pet friendly stores. I’d like to be able to take her out more without a hassle.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Ruby does look like a sweetie. One of the most common answers I give is to obedience train. This is because taking a dog to positive reinforcement obedience classes sets the stage for so many scenarios in a dog's life. Socialization with other dogs in the controlled setting of the classes will go a long way toward you being able to take Ruby out to pet stores, the vet, parks, and more. It will help her gain confidence and trust you in that the people around her are safe to get to know. In the meantime, this guide has a few tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-great-dane. This is good also:https://wagwalking.com/training/get-along-with-other-dogs, as is this: https://wagwalking.com/training/be-independent Good luck!

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Jesse
Boxer
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Jesse
Boxer
3 Years

Hello. I’d really like to take my dog on walks however he is totally wild when he is on the leash and it is extremely difficult to get his attention when he’s all wound up. When I try to walk him, he will get overly excited and grab the leash and try to play tug of war with me. He has an extremely strong grip so I often can’t get the leash back from him. I have tried to use a pincher collar and give him a tug when he did this. It worked at first but now he could not care less if the collar is pinching him. Along with this over-excitement if another person or dog walks by he goes absolutely wild and starts barking and pulling on the leash. I am afraid to try to introduce him when we’re walking because all of his hair sticks up and I’m not sure if he will be aggressive. I would love to take him out and walk him more but he is so wild and I am totally afraid to. Any tips or advice??

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Danielle, If you have a fenced in yard, I suggest practicing the Turns method off leash in your fenced in yard first. Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel I suggest practicing Leave It and Drop it commands inside with toys, then with moving objects - he should never get the object he is supposed to leave, reward with something else like a treat. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Once pup can do an off-leash heel, then practice short periods with the leash on, utilizing the leave it and heel commands and keeping the leash loose. The goal is to work on pup's impulse control and focus on you so that the leash is only there as back up. Right now it sounds like pup's focus and respect for you are really what's lacking so I would work on improving those core things. Some other good ways to increase focus and impulse control are a long place command, touch command, watch me, and Out. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kara
Siberian Husky German Shepard
1 Year
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Kara
Siberian Husky German Shepard
1 Year

I'd love to take my dog, Kara hiking but I'm afraid of her lunging and and overall not listening to me with distractions. She's got a lot of husky in her and she loves to pull. I notice when I walk on short leash, she will heel for a few seconds, ill praise her and she will immediately go ahead of me and pull. I've been working with her for weeks now and I don't see any improvement. How can I train her to pay attention and stop lunging so hard she raises herself on the harness?

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Xena
Boxer
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Xena
Boxer
5 Months

Xena will easily do as we say when we're at home and if there are small distractions such as toys being thrown, and family members walking by. But the minute we're in public, she wont even look at the treat, and will get so excited to see people and it takes her a few minutes to cool back down.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Malka, First, know that that is completely normal at this age and stage in training. Pup simply needs more socialization and to practice obedience with gradually harder and harder levels of distractions before they will have the skills to listen in those environments also. A good way to gain those skills is to join an outside puppy training class or club, where you can practice pup's obedience around other puppies and people, or simply spend time going over pups obedience in gradually more and more distracting locations. For example, practice obedience at home until pup is consistent there, then in a calm neighborhood cul-de-sac, then other slightly busier parts of the neighborhood, then in a calm park, then a busier park, then outside the pet store, then inside the pet store, ect...Work up to the harder distractions, repeating obedience practice at the current level of difficulty until pup is doing well before moving onto a harder amount of distractions - this helps pup learn skills like listening, focus, learning to ignore other things, and to generalize their obedience to other situations too (dogs don't generalize well, so something they learn in one situation - like your house, has to be practiced in multiple different situations before they have learned it overall). Also, spend a lot of time exposing pup to other puppies, people, and new environments to help them develop a balanced temperament, become adaptable as an adult, prevent fear and aggression, and learn to be calmer around new things - because those new things become normal and not so new anymore. Having people give pup commands like sit and then reward pup with a treat or a pet after they obey can also help pup learn to love people while practicing their obedience around exciting things. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hendrix and Darcey
Cocker Spaniel
2 Years
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Hendrix and Darcey
Cocker Spaniel
2 Years

Both dogs bark when the doorbell goes and continue to bark whilst i go to the door (if its post or deliveries etc) or until the person comes in and gives them fuss. When somebody comes in i do make them sit and wait before i open the baby gate but this can sometimes take 5 minutes.
How do i stop the barking?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emily, I suggest desensitizing them to the doorbell and guests appearing and teaching the Quiet command. Quiet method for quiet command - which should also help with doorbell desensitizing: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Desensitizing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nala
Goldendoodle
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Nala
Goldendoodle
8 Weeks

I want to be able to bring Nala in public places, but I’m worried she’ll lunge at people or bark at them or misbehave in some way. I would like her to be calm and keep the leash loose, but I don’t know how to teach her to do so, could you help?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Zayne, Check out the Sit method from this article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Also, check out the Treat Lure method from this article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Finally, you can download a free PDF e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy at this link below, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers. There is a lot of great advice on how to socialize there. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tinsel
German Shepherd
1 Year
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Tinsel
German Shepherd
1 Year

She likes to counter-surf, bark, and doesn't like wheels, so she Chase's after them, and tries to bite them

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kaiya, First, I suggest teaching a solid Leave It command to pup. Teach the Leave It command using the Leave It method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Second, teach pup a structured heel - practice away from cars at first. Check out the article and video linked below Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Check out this video about implementing the obedience for car chasing/wheel chasing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buaZctWLWR0 For the counter surfing, also practice Leave It. Gradually work up to pup leaving harder foods alone - like kibble - treats - chicken - hotdogs - until pup can leave food on the floor alone when told that command while you are there to enforce it and prevent pup from grabbing it. For surfing that is happening while you are out of the room, I recommend creating an aversion to jumping on the counter itself. There are a few ways to do this. You can place something like a scat mat on the counter and put a food temptation further back on the counter just out of reach - when pup jumps up the mat gives a static shock - nothing harsh but its uncomfortable and surprising. You can also set up Snap Traps covered lightly with unfolded napkins. When pup touches them on the edge of the counter, they will jump up and make a snapping sound - startling pup. These are designed for this type of purpose so won't actually close on pup like real mouse traps would - don't use real mouse traps because of the risk of injury. You can also stack metal pot lids and pans precariously on the counter. Tie a strong string like twine through all of them and back tie the whole contraption to something secure so that when they fall they can't fall all the way off the counter, then tie another string to the lip or pan that's supporting the precarious set up and tie the other end of that string to a safe food booby trap, like a whole bagel sitting on the counter. The idea is that when pup jumps up and grabs the food, they will pull the objects over and create a loud crashing noise that will surprise them. Because of the back tie string the objects should not fall on pup though. With all of these setups, you will need to set up a camera to spy on pup from the other room and be ready to run in and remove any food left on the counter or floor, so that pup doesn't return to the scene of the crime once things are calm and eat the food anyway - otherwise they may decide that its still worth it to jump up. You will need to practice this setup often with pup in different parts of the counter and with different foods. Don't use any food that could harm pup if they were to eat it - like chicken bones, grapes, chocolate, xylitol, nuts, garlic, or onion. When not practicing the trap, keep counters clean and pup confined away from the area or tethered to you with a hands free leash until pup has thoroughly learned the lesson - jumping up and not being surprised and potentially grabbing food, will negate your training efforts - you want pup to think that the counter is always suspicious now so they give up on jumping up. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Shaggy
Husky
6 Months
0 found helpful
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Shaggy
Husky
6 Months

He is really scared to be out side the house

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Paola, I would start by simply sitting outside with pup in a calm area for an extended amount of time, pup 30-60 minutes. Play fun games or hide treats (in pesticide free areas) if he will take treats, or simply sit and read a book while pup just hangs out with you calmly and adjusts to the new things in their environment. When pup gets used to that spot, move to another area or your yard, neighborhood, park, ect... and do the same thing. Getting pup used to various things gradually instead of all at once while walking. Make walks and outings a regular thing once pup is more adjusted, bringing treats along to reward confidence, friendliness, calmness, and curiosity along the walk. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Charlie
Australian Cattle Dog
1 Year
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Charlie
Australian Cattle Dog
1 Year

He is very hyper and acts crazy on walks and out in public. i want him to be able to go out without causing a huge scene and barking and pulling on his leash.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you desensitize him to his outside surroundings. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice commands like sit and lay down (with treats!) every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog or person, and he turns his head away from the once exciting distraction, and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog.

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Edi
Staffie
1 Year
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Edi
Staffie
1 Year

My sweet girl - staffy x kelpie - just loves people and her collection of balls on ropes; one for yard and two in the car for the park; she can pick 'stinky' 'bouncy' and 'red' ball on command.

My friends at the park walking track each afternoon don't have a dog, so enjoy the interaction with Edi; throwing the ball for her as we walk along chatting about the day.

The trouble is she is now not returning to me when I say 'here', instead she runs to them and even seeks them out, running a great distance to them, which they make a huge fuss of. There is no point asking them to help with this by ignoring her. They even object to her being recalled by me, 'she's just having fun.' How do I train my dog AND my friends?

Regards,
Nonnette

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nonnette, Check out the PreMack Principle and the Long leash sections of the article linked below. I would work with pup around the friends with pup wearing a padded back clip harness (instead of collar to protect neck better) while using a 20'-40' length training leash, that you can reel pup in with when pup doesn't obey, allow pup to feel like they are off leash still, reward with a treat when they come to you when called, then allow enough slack in the leash for pup to get to your friends all the way AFTER pup comes to you first, so that going to your friends is the reward for coming to you first. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ You could also recruit the friends to play a game of round robin to help involve them in a game that also doubles as training, to encourage their involvement, in addition to the above real-life training I mentioned first above - which I would make priority. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Saber
German Shepherd
5 Months
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Saber
German Shepherd
5 Months

My dog barks and try’s to run at both people and dogs when out in public. He is currently just under 30kg so big puppy and I’m worried soon he will pull me with him with this. How do I tackle this behaviour without losing my mind in public?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erin, First, I would start by teaching pup a formal Heel command if they don't already know it. The initial goal is just to teach pup what a word means and motivate them to learn. What comes next is intermediate obedience. For intermediate obedience, you will gradually work up to distractions and pup developing the skills to obey in those situations too - at first the distraction might be someone walking through the room, a squirrel in the yard, a leaf blowing by, ect...Start with less distracting environments, then gradually move onto harder environments and spend intentional time practicing in each of those new environments until pup can focus there too. For example, in your home without others around is easiest, your backyard is a bit harder, your front yard is even harder, your neighborhood is even hard, your home with guests present is even harder, a pet store is even harder, the park with other dogs around is harder or similar, ect...Go out of your way to practice at the current level pup needs to learn at and to create the distractions pup is ready to learn to overcome during training sessions when you can control things - so that pup can also respond when things are more out of your control in every day life, but keep the distraction level what pup is ready for at that point in the training so pup can still succeed with your help - the goal is to guide pup and provide consistent, calm boundaries at this point. Second, you may need to switch some of your training methods if pup knows the command and is sometimes choosing to disobey. If pup is pulling because they are aggressive, reactive, or fearful, and not just excited, you will want to work on more socialization and counter conditioning too to help pup associate people with good things. I would consider hiring a professional trainer with experience with those things, who comes well recommended, to help you in person if that's the case. Temperament issues like aggression and fear are very time sensitive with puppies. The sooner its addressed the better the future outcome is likely to be. Reactivity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eo-L2qtD7MQ Some other methods to help enforce commands when pup is ready: Reel In method for Come: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Turns method for Heel: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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