How to Train a Chow Chow Puppy to Not Bite

Medium
2-12 Months
Behavior

Introduction

The Chow Chow is one of the oldest breeds known to man. They originated in China as a multi-purpose dog, useful in war, hunting, and at home. With their incredibly fluffy smooth or rough coats, thicker around the ruff to intensify their lion-like appearance, their blue tongue, and wrinkled face, the Chow Chow is one of the most distinctive looking of dogs. They are simultaneously cuddly and intimidating. Chows are reputed to be fiercely loyal and protective of their families, and so it is very important to carefully socialize and train your Chow to be polite with visitors. While all puppies are prone to being mouthy and it is important for all breeds to be taught mouth manners, this is exceptionally important for breeds like the Chow.

Defining Tasks

Puppies, like human babies, explore the world with their mouths, and your Chow pup is no exception. Growing puppies also learn social rules and manners, and controlling their mouths is one of the most important of those rules. Your Chow puppy was taught about bite pressure from her mother and siblings, but she will need to learn an entirely new set of rules now that she is living in a human family. Even if you and your family are amused by your adorable Chow Chow pup's rambunctious play, you will be less happy when your Chow is big and her bites start to hurt. Teach bite inhibition and control now to prevent problems later on.

Getting Started

While your puppy isn't biting you just because she has nothing else to chew on, having plenty of other things to chew on will help her redirect her desire to chew on you. Make sure you have plenty of good chew toys, balls, and tug toys for her to sink her teeth into. Puppies seek out diverse materials, textures, and sizes, so make sure you provide a variety for your Chow. 

Food is the great motivator when it comes to training puppies,  and even if your Chow Chow really wants to nibble on you, she will find restraint when presented with actual yummy food. Make sure you have plenty of good treats available, but be careful that you balance nutrients for your puppy's rapidly growing body.

The Bite the Right Thing Method

Most Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Driven to bite
Chows are an ancient breed, largely used for protection, and some have a powerful bite and protection drive. If your puppy needs an outlet for her bite drive that isn't you, try bitework.
Step
2
Bite the sleeve
Teach your Chow Chow to bite a bite sleeve by shaking it and making it enticing to her. Teach her now when a misstep won't matter as much that she is to bite the sleeve and not any other part of your body.
Step
3
Earn the sleeve
When your Chow Chow bites the sleeve, let her have it for a time to reward her.
Step
4
Name the bite
As your Chow Chow develops focus, give a command for the bite. Make sure it is nothing you would accidentally say. Train until your Chow is waiting patiently for the command to be said.
Step
5
Control the bite
Practice having your Chow bite or not bite brave friends wearing the sleeve. With practice you will have control over when your Chow bites and when she doesn't.
Recommend training method?

The Ouch! That Hurts Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Hands are fun
Play with your Chow puppy with your hands, allowing her to put them in her mouth but being careful not to pull back quickly and trigger her to hold on.
Step
2
Ouch, too much!
As soon as your puppy nips too hard and causes you any discomfort, dramatically overplay how much it hurts, yelling "ow!", letting your hand go limp, and pulling back from play.
Step
3
Time out
Remove yourself from play, closing a door between you and your puppy if necessary, for only twenty to thirty seconds.
Step
4
Go back to play
Go back to playing with your Chow Chow with your hands. As soon as you are uncomfortable, go through the 'ouch' and time out routine again.
Step
5
Puppy instigates play
Keep playing, allowing your puppy to draw you into play. If she presentes you with a toy, reward her and play with that. If she wants to play with your hands, be strict. She will soon likely choose to use toys.
Recommend training method?

The No Teeth on Flesh Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Constant toys
Always have diverse chew and tug toys available, preferably having one on your person or within reach at all times when you are with your Chow.
Step
2
Play often
Instigate play with your Chow Chow often, inviting her to play tug or chase with toys.
Step
3
React dramatically
If your puppy ever puts teeth on you, either accidentally or on purpose in the midst of play, yell "ouch!", go limp, and remove yourself from play for several seconds.
Step
4
Offer a toy
Go back to your Chow, offering a toy playfully. Continue playing as long as she doesn't put teeth on you.
Step
5
Test your Chow Chow
Test your Chow's understanding and comitment to not putting teeth on you by presenting your hands while playing tug, so that she has to be careful to grasp the toy instead of you.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Coral Drake

Published: 02/09/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Chow chow
Chow Chow
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Chow chow
Chow Chow
7 Weeks

she bite on cloths and feet

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Yvonne, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method (which you are already essentially doing). BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good at the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Simba
Chow Chow
7 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Simba
Chow Chow
7 Months

Be keeps biting his hind quarter sometimes both sides this has only happened since he starting to shed his puppy fur but hes pulling at it

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Steve, If he is used to being handled try parting the fur and see if there is a hot spot (red or inflamed area) or if his fur is tangled there (somethings knots will form and pull and be uncomfortable while shedding). If there is inflammation and redness, then a trip to your vet is needed to see if there is a fungal or bacterial infection or simply buy medicated shampoo - I am not a vet so your vet can evaluate. If there is a knot, then a trip to the groomers is needed or you can try to carefully get the knots and extra fur bunched up out yourself. If it is irritated he may need to wear a cone for a bit while it heals to keep him from biting at it and making it worse. If he is not on flea or tick medication, then check for fleas or ticks. Fleas will also leave little black dots smaller than grains of sand behind - You can wet a white paper towel and rub it over a furless area like his belly and see if you pick up any black dots - when the dots get wet they will typically turn red-ish if it's from fleas - it is the digested blood that they eat dried. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Moose
Chow Chow
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Moose
Chow Chow
9 Weeks

We went to pick the dog up from the breeder. The breeder wanted to meet in a parking lot so when the breeder gave us the dog I put a leash on him and wanted to take him over to a grassy area so he could pee before the car ride home. When I put him down he hide under the car. The breeder was able to cox him out but when I tried to pick him up he snarled and bite my hand. I sat with him a while and went very slow but was able to pick him up. The whole car ride home I was able to pet him and he was good. But now he growls at everyone in the house and still snaps a people when they get close. What should I do?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Did you meet Moose before you decided to take him? It is unusual that a breeder would want to meet in a parking lot and not at the kennel; this type of introduction could be intimidating to a young pup and maybe a bit scary, too. That may explain the bite. The fact that Moose growls and bites at everyone sounds like he may not have been socialized well. I would contact a trainer in your area used to dealing with fearful and aggressive dogs (Moose may be reacting out of fear). The trainer can help Moose learn that people are nice and meant to be his friends. Take Moose out for walks often in the meantime so that he can bond with you. When in the house, let him come to you and give him treats when he does to encourage interaction. Do not punish him for his behavior; instead, give him love and assurance. But, a professional trainer is needed. Good luck!

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Sansan
Chow Chow
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sansan
Chow Chow
2 Months

My dog keeps on biting my hands and arms. I bought him a toy and a chew bone but he don’t play with them. He keeps on biting someone’s hand/feet. I don’t know what to do. I don’t have any idea how to tame chow chow. It’s my first time to have a chow chow. Thank you

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Bella
Chow Chow
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Bella
Chow Chow
2 Months

This is my first time owning a dog , so I don’t have experience in training a dog. I have problems with her sleeping at night , I don’t like her to sleep with me in my room but at some point she cannot stay alone in the living room and sleep there, and whenever someone is going to their rooms she follows them so how exactly am I going to make her know that this is where she should sleep ?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! If you haven't already, you may want to get her a crate, or at the least, a dog bed that is specifically her own. She likely won't sleep through the night for another month or so because of her age, but the crate will keep her confined and it will give her her own space. Dogs are denning animals and they prefer to have a space of their own. When left to wander and roam, their anxiety can sometimes increase. A crate also aids in potty training as they USUALLY won't eliminate in their sleeping space unless it is an emergency.

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Tofu
Chow x Jap Spitz
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Tofu
Chow x Jap Spitz
3 Months

Keeps biting non stop and doesn't understand NO. Quite lazy and extremely difficult to train because nothing motivates him (treats/toys)

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Dillon
Chow Chow
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Dillon
Chow Chow
3 Months

He is biting aggressive

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Question
Bush
Chow Chow
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bush
Chow Chow
2 Months

My Dog bites when excited or he wants to play. He just bite within a certain period that is in the evening. He sleeps whole night and morning.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shrilay, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the bite inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. In the evening pup is more likely to feel stir crazy if they haven't had any mental stimulation like training, or to feel overtired. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. I would also work on teaching games that keep things a bit more structured - like instead of tug of war, begin teaching fetch. Enjoy the training process with pup as part of the game. At this age, pup will likely have a short attention span and learn in small steps, a little at a time how to do things like come and drop and chase the toy - running away from pup to encourage chasing, trading pup another toy to encourage dropping, and wiggling the toy along the ground before tossing a short distance away can help young puppies stay engaged in the training games. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-to-fetch/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
PANDA /CHOW CHOW/
Chow Chow
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
PANDA /CHOW CHOW/
Chow Chow
2 Months

my dog is always trying to bite of my body. when i am trying to pamper, he just bite me.
i trying to this lesson but it doesnt help. he is too stubborn. when i scold him he ignore me and trying to bite me

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Oyudia, First, know that the biting is normal. Puppies interact with litter mates with their mouths and learn about the world around them by chewing and mouthing. It's normal for this to take a couple months to improve. Pup will need your help learning though so that the behavior doesn't continue past the period where pup's jaws are weak and bites not dangerous. Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the bite inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Playing with other puppies can also help bite to be more gentle with the pressure of their bites. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Teddy
Chow Chow
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Teddy
Chow Chow
2 Months

He's biting me often and becoming a bit aggressive

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Veda, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the bite inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Commands that increase self-control in general and teach pup calmness are also good things to teach. These commands will take time to teach of course, but they can also be a great way to create your own puppy class with pup. If you have other friends' with puppies, why not invite them over, sending them the following videos and articles too, and practice it all together - allowing puppies to learn and be socialized. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nala
Chow Chow
14 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Nala
Chow Chow
14 Weeks

I am having trouble with my chow teething and choosing to bite on my daughter's hair or clothes while she is walking. My daughter is only 5 and I am tried the method of locking her up, but i tend to lock her up for a few minuets rather than seconds. Can that be the reason she is not understanding that she is doing wrong? she also runs from me when i get up to grab her to put her in the other room. so its a hassle to discipline.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Question
Cooper
Chow Chow
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Cooper
Chow Chow
2 Months

What should we do since our puppy usually bites us when we are playing.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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