How to Train a Husky Puppy to Not Bite

Easy
3-5 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Imagine this: you’re playing with your new Husky puppy when suddenly--Ouch! He sinks his little puppy teeth into your hand. Huskies are hunting dogs and as puppies, they are likely to instinctively begin practicing their skills, which include biting. If you have a young Husky, he is likely primed to bite as soon as he gets excited. This kind of behavior is especially a problem if you have young kids in the house. You shouldn’t be surprised if your puppy chases screaming or running kiddos around the house nipping at their heels.

Defining Tasks

What starts as cute behavior in a very young, small puppy can become an issue as your Husky grows and gains his adult teeth. Training your Husky puppy to not bite is crucial to raising a well-behaved adult dog. It may be difficult at first to stop your young puppy from biting and nipping, especially during play time. But if you provide consistent positive reinforcement, you should be able to improve your Husky puppy’s manners within a few weeks.

Getting Started

With this type of command, you need to train your puppy consistently as he is going about his everyday life. Whenever your Husky pup bites or nips you, you should stop the behavior and provide an alternative or reward him for stopping. Make sure everyone in your house follows the same rules so your puppy understands that biting a human is never okay. Depending on the method you choose, you will need treats, toys, or another alternative for him to chew on, such as a soft bone for puppies. Remember to use positive reinforcement. Reward your puppy when he behaves well rather than scolding him for biting.

The No Bite Method

ribbon-method-2
Most Recommended
5 Votes
Step
1
Choose a command word
With this method, you will choose a command to use to stop your Husky puppy from biting. You can use a variety of cues, such as “Uh-uh,” “Hey,” or “No bite.” Whatever you choose, be consistent. Always use the same command word for when you want your puppy to stop biting.
Step
2
Wait for teeth
As soon as you feel your puppy’s teeth on you, use your command word and wait until you feel the pressure lessen. In the beginning, he doesn’t have to let go altogether. Once you feel him let up a little, reward him with praise and a treat.
Step
3
Keep it up
Continue practicing with your command word and have everyone in your house do the same. You want your puppy to connect the command word with a treat. Soon, he should start looking for a treat as soon as he hears the command, which will make him let go.
Step
4
Expect more from your pup
When your Husky starts to get the hang of the command word, hold off on the treat until he lets go of you entirely. Stop rewarding him if he only lessens the pressure, so he recognizes that the only way to get the reward is to stop biting.
Step
5
Exchange treats for a toy
After a couple of weeks of consistent practice, start weaning your puppy off of treats as a reward. Replace them with praise and a toy instead so he learns that toys are okay to bite, while humans are not.
Recommend training method?

The Mama Dog Method

ribbon-method-3
Effective
3 Votes
Step
1
Look to nature
When Huskies stay with their mom, she has ways of training them to not bite inappropriately. To get the behavior she wants, Mama Husky will grab her pups by the muzzle or the scruff of neck. If your puppy won’t stop biting, you can look to Mama Dog for some tricks.
Step
2
Gently grab your puppy's muzzle
When your puppy is biting you, gently place your hand around his muzzle. He should freeze or let go of you, as these instincts are part of his biology.
Step
3
Apply firm but gentle pressure
Once your body is out of your Husky puppy’s mouth, place a very light pressure to his muzzle as a cue for your puppy to stop biting. This action mimics what his mother would do.
Step
4
Use the scruff
If your puppy is still struggling to bite you, gently grab the loose skin behind his neck, known as the scruff, and hold. You shouldn’t shake your puppy or lift him up. Just hold his scruff until he freezes. Then cue your puppy to stop biting by applying gentle pressure to his muzzle.
Step
5
Redirect his energy
Once your puppy calms down and stops trying to bite you, give him a toy or a bone to chew on instead. Biting is an important part of communication for your puppy and you shouldn’t expect him to stop altogether. Redirecting his energy is an important part of keeping your Husky puppy happy.
Recommend training method?

The Ouch! Method

ribbon-method-1
Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Play with your puppy
The most common activity which will cause your Husky puppy to bite is playing. Keep in mind that for young Huskies, play time is about getting ready for hunting. Begin a training session by playing with your puppy.
Step
2
Say "Ouch!"
Wait for your puppy to bite you and then say “ouch!” You should use a high-pitched voice when you do so and then move the part of your body away from him.
Step
3
Replace your body with a better chew toy
You want to channel your Husky puppy’s instinct for biting into another more suitable object. A toy or a soft rope bone is a good choice and can help cue your puppy to the kind of thing that is acceptable to bite.
Step
4
Keep practicing
Be consistent with your actions and keep practicing with your puppy. He may stop biting hard but continue nipping. Start saying “ouch” every time his teeth touch your skin.
Step
5
Reward good behavior
Keep an eye on your puppy’s behavior and when you see him run for a toy while playing rather than biting you, reward him by saying “good dog” or giving him a treat. Remember, rewards for good behavior work much better than scolding for bad.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Christina Gunning

Published: 02/26/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Bart
Husky
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Bart
Husky
9 Months

My husky puppy has a problem with biting, hard to get him to stop

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1108 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aaron, For the biting, I would teach Leave It from the Leave It method below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also teach Out - which means move away, and especially pay attention to the section on using Out to Deal with Pushiness once you have taught pup what the Out command means using the section on How to Teach Out. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Depending on whether pup's roughness is at all aggressive or has the potential to pierce skin, you may also need to desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle ahead of time using food rewards. The above information is related to puppy mouthing - playful type biting. If the biting is aggressive in nature opposed to being leftover puppy mouthing that's meant as playful, then I would hire a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression to help you in person for this, rather than training on your own due to the complexity and safety concerns of aggression. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Diamond
Siberian Husky
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Diamond
Siberian Husky
3 Months

My dog keeps having tantrums and bitings us once a day. what does it mean and how can we train her not to bite.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1108 Dog owners recommended

Hello Renz, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Out command from the second article linked below to make her leave the area as a consequence. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The Out method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just playing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area, is also a good command for you to use if pup bites the kids. Check out the section on Using Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior for how to calmly enforce that command once it's taught. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Right now, an outside class may be best in a fenced area, or letting friends' pups play in someone's fence outside. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Practicing regular obedience commands or having pup earn what they get by performing commands like Sit and Down before feeding, petting, tossing a toy, opening the door for a walk, ect... can also help stimulate pup mentally to increase calmness and wear them out. Commands that practice focus, self-control, and learning something a bit new or harder than before can all tire out puppies. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Peezy
Husky
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Peezy
Husky
3 Months

I have a blue husky I believe he was a gift to me I never trained a dog before if it is a challenge I’m up for it any tips on how to make this go smoothly as possible?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1108 Dog owners recommended

Hello Art, Here are a few resources for raising a puppy. Potty training with tethering and Crate Training methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Next, check out these videos of a puppy class. Follow along with your puppy at home and practice the exercises to help with general basic obedience: Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Socialization and Bite Inhibition are the most time sensitive, potty training and chew toy training should also be priorities at this age. Obedience is important and helpful to teach early, but if you don't have time for socialization, bite inhibition, potty training, and chew toy training, obedience can also be taught once a bit older without loosing your chance - it isn't very age dependent like socialization is. A puppy's attention span is going to be short, so frequent but short training sessions are best at this age. Carry treats on walks and when out in public to use for training and socialization opportunities - or pup's kibble. Expect things like bite inhibition and potty training to take about three months - you are looking for gradual progress and not instant results, and that's normal, just stay consistent as long as you see gradual progress. The more accidents you can prevent through pup's schedule, confinement, and supervision during those first three months, the quicker pup is likely to become potty trained. Potty training is all about building a long term habit of cleanliness, which is mostly don't through preventing accidents inside. Punishments and rewards are a lot less effective than just preventing accidents through a frequent potty trip schedule, use of a crate when you can't supervise closely, and supervising. It will be normal for pup to take up needing 1-2 potty trips for a month or two at least. Keep those potty trips super boring and on leash, without treats, play, or feeding breakfast early. Return pup back to the crate immediately after they go potty and ignore any crying for attention, to help pup learn to sleep through the night as soon as their bladder capacity will allow, and not to wake up extra for attention until then. Congratulations on your first puppy! Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
RUSH
Husky
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
RUSH
Husky
2 Months

my dog always bite, this is my first time having a husky since I do have a lot of chows, but this one is different

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1108 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lyke, Some breeds and individuals are a lot more mouthy as puppies than others. Huskies and Retrievers for example tend to be pretty mouthy as pup, so this is likely normal for your dog at this age. Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also work on teaching the Out command, and then use the section from the article on How to Use Out to Deal with Pushiness, to enforce it when pup doesn't listen, especially around other animals or kids. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Louie
Huskador
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Louie
Huskador
5 Months

Our puppy is always constantly biting for no reason ( out of playtime ) and will drag and growl when hanging onto your trousers and won’t let go, he will bark and bite if you try to get him to stop or let go and will never listen to commands unless treats are in your hand and even then he will attempt to bite them out anyway.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1108 Dog owners recommended

Hello Holly, I would work on teaching the following commands and methods. Leave It method - for biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area. For when pup is overly excited and rough in general: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s All three of these methods for gently building respect and listening: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you I would also keep a drag leash on pup when you are home to supervise and ensure it doesn't get caught on anything, then you can calmly pick up the end of the leash and start enforcing commands. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Success
Darling
Labradoodle
3 Months

Darling used to pee in the house all of the time!!! But now she is well trained and goes outside to potty.

2 years ago
:)
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