How to Train a Husky Puppy to Not Bite

Easy
3-5 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Imagine this: you’re playing with your new Husky puppy when suddenly--Ouch! He sinks his little puppy teeth into your hand. Huskies are hunting dogs and as puppies, they are likely to instinctively begin practicing their skills, which include biting. If you have a young Husky, he is likely primed to bite as soon as he gets excited. This kind of behavior is especially a problem if you have young kids in the house. You shouldn’t be surprised if your puppy chases screaming or running kiddos around the house nipping at their heels.

Defining Tasks

What starts as cute behavior in a very young, small puppy can become an issue as your Husky grows and gains his adult teeth. Training your Husky puppy to not bite is crucial to raising a well-behaved adult dog. It may be difficult at first to stop your young puppy from biting and nipping, especially during play time. But if you provide consistent positive reinforcement, you should be able to improve your Husky puppy’s manners within a few weeks.

Getting Started

With this type of command, you need to train your puppy consistently as he is going about his everyday life. Whenever your Husky pup bites or nips you, you should stop the behavior and provide an alternative or reward him for stopping. Make sure everyone in your house follows the same rules so your puppy understands that biting a human is never okay. Depending on the method you choose, you will need treats, toys, or another alternative for him to chew on, such as a soft bone for puppies. Remember to use positive reinforcement. Reward your puppy when he behaves well rather than scolding him for biting.

The No Bite Method

Most Recommended
5 Votes
Step
1
Choose a command word
With this method, you will choose a command to use to stop your Husky puppy from biting. You can use a variety of cues, such as “Uh-uh,” “Hey,” or “No bite.” Whatever you choose, be consistent. Always use the same command word for when you want your puppy to stop biting.
Step
2
Wait for teeth
As soon as you feel your puppy’s teeth on you, use your command word and wait until you feel the pressure lessen. In the beginning, he doesn’t have to let go altogether. Once you feel him let up a little, reward him with praise and a treat.
Step
3
Keep it up
Continue practicing with your command word and have everyone in your house do the same. You want your puppy to connect the command word with a treat. Soon, he should start looking for a treat as soon as he hears the command, which will make him let go.
Step
4
Expect more from your pup
When your Husky starts to get the hang of the command word, hold off on the treat until he lets go of you entirely. Stop rewarding him if he only lessens the pressure, so he recognizes that the only way to get the reward is to stop biting.
Step
5
Exchange treats for a toy
After a couple of weeks of consistent practice, start weaning your puppy off of treats as a reward. Replace them with praise and a toy instead so he learns that toys are okay to bite, while humans are not.
Recommend training method?

The Mama Dog Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Look to nature
When Huskies stay with their mom, she has ways of training them to not bite inappropriately. To get the behavior she wants, Mama Husky will grab her pups by the muzzle or the scruff of neck. If your puppy won’t stop biting, you can look to Mama Dog for some tricks.
Step
2
Gently grab your puppy's muzzle
When your puppy is biting you, gently place your hand around his muzzle. He should freeze or let go of you, as these instincts are part of his biology.
Step
3
Apply firm but gentle pressure
Once your body is out of your Husky puppy’s mouth, place a very light pressure to his muzzle as a cue for your puppy to stop biting. This action mimics what his mother would do.
Step
4
Use the scruff
If your puppy is still struggling to bite you, gently grab the loose skin behind his neck, known as the scruff, and hold. You shouldn’t shake your puppy or lift him up. Just hold his scruff until he freezes. Then cue your puppy to stop biting by applying gentle pressure to his muzzle.
Step
5
Redirect his energy
Once your puppy calms down and stops trying to bite you, give him a toy or a bone to chew on instead. Biting is an important part of communication for your puppy and you shouldn’t expect him to stop altogether. Redirecting his energy is an important part of keeping your Husky puppy happy.
Recommend training method?

The Ouch! Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Play with your puppy
The most common activity which will cause your Husky puppy to bite is playing. Keep in mind that for young Huskies, play time is about getting ready for hunting. Begin a training session by playing with your puppy.
Step
2
Say "Ouch!"
Wait for your puppy to bite you and then say “ouch!” You should use a high-pitched voice when you do so and then move the part of your body away from him.
Step
3
Replace your body with a better chew toy
You want to channel your Husky puppy’s instinct for biting into another more suitable object. A toy or a soft rope bone is a good choice and can help cue your puppy to the kind of thing that is acceptable to bite.
Step
4
Keep practicing
Be consistent with your actions and keep practicing with your puppy. He may stop biting hard but continue nipping. Start saying “ouch” every time his teeth touch your skin.
Step
5
Reward good behavior
Keep an eye on your puppy’s behavior and when you see him run for a toy while playing rather than biting you, reward him by saying “good dog” or giving him a treat. Remember, rewards for good behavior work much better than scolding for bad.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Christina Gunning

Published: 02/26/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
sobashka
Husky
1 Month
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
sobashka
Husky
1 Month

he always bites me when i play with him. AND HE ALSO BITES ME WHEN I WANT TO CARRY HIM TO THE CAR OR IF I TOUCH HIM SOFTLY HE WILL ALSO BITE ME HOW AM I SUPPOSE TO STOP THIS

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Sobashka is quite likely teething. Buy him toys with different textures that are specific to teething. When he bites, provide a diversion and also tell him no. Be consistent and do not allow any biting at all - not even play-biting. Look at the Withdraw Attention Method and the Do's and Don'ts Method, both explained here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-husky-puppy-to-stop-biting. As well, it is never to early to start obedience training. There are great concepts and methods to practice here:https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-great-dane. Keep training and practicing. Huskies are smart but can be a bit stubborn. Work with Sobashka for the perfect partnership! All the best!

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Jacky
Siberian Husky
4 Months
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Jacky
Siberian Husky
4 Months

My puppy always biting ?please advise me any suggestions to stop it

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mythili, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hash
Saberian husky
1 Month
0 found helpful
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Hash
Saberian husky
1 Month

It is biting hands.. i want it to stop it..

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, puppy biting is quite common but that does not mean you have to allow it. Buy Hash textured teething toys - he may be teething and have sore gums. The Siberian Husky is also a dog that needs a lot of physical exercise and mental stimulation. Check that his vaccines are up to date and ask the vet about where it is okay to exercise him. The backyard should be okay to start. Play games of fetch and let him wear off steam in the yard. Hash will also need interactive toys to keep him busy mentally. Feed him a portion of his breakfast and the rest in the feeder, which will keep him busy. Take a look here for tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-husky-puppy-to-not-bite. Redirect his bites elsewhere, to toys and activities. Good luck!

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Kira
Siberian Husky
1 Year
0 found helpful
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Kira
Siberian Husky
1 Year

My husky keeps nipping at me all the time when I come home and keeps jumping to nip at me as well and she only goes to nip at my hand or arm and doesn't listen to me at all when I try to tell her to stop

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Conlan, Does pup have any history of aggression? Is the nipping purely out of excitement and play or are their any other signs of aggression. If the nipping is related to other respect or aggression issues I would proceed with the help of a trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues, who can further evaluate the situation and tailor a training plan to you. If this is aggression related there is the risk of a bite of you do the training yourself without the right help. If the nipping is truly out of excitement and play, then I suggest working on some boundaries and teaching impulse control. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Jumping and general rudeness - only do this for play biting. For aggression a different approach is needed. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg Impulse control: Place: https://youtu.be/omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://youtu.be/mn5HTiryZN8 Structured heel to build impulse pulse control, calmness and respect: https://youtu.be/OTiKVc4ZZWo Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lily
Huskita
3 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Lily
Huskita
3 Months

My dog just nips at me when I try to pet her or give her a toy. She will continue nipping I'm not sure how to get her to stop. She doesn't respond when I tell her no or when I yelp.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diana, First, I suggest working on the Leave It command from the Leave It method from the article linked below for the biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When she gets really worked up and has trouble calming down, use the Out command or give her a food stuffed chew toy in a crate or exercise pen to let her calm back down - young puppies will often act wild when they are actually tired and need a rest time. Out command, "How to Teach a Dog the Out Command" heading part: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Second, work on teaching her tolerance to being touched and handled. To desensitize her to touch use her meal kibble. Measure her kibble into a bag (don't grab it out of her bowl), and feed her one piece of kibble at a time as a reward for tolerating touch. Start with areas she enjoys being touched on first, until she is comfortable with those areas, and gradually move onto touches in other areas also. Be gentle and try to make the training fun and relaxing for her. For example, gently touch her side while you feed her a treat - the touch should be brief and stop when the treat is gone. Touch her head and feed a treat. Touch her collar and feed a treat. Touch her paw and feed a treat, ect...until she looks forward to being touched. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hi Caitlyn I have a question, I recently adopted a 15 week husky female, she is very friendly, but when she plays she starts to knit at your face with her teeth. How do you stop this kind of behavior? Also when I put her in her crate when she starts to get to hyper she starts screaming, how do you correctly crate them?

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Ace
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Ace
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks

How do I stop him from biting

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sattraj, Check out the Leave method from the article linked below Work on teaching Leave It. Leave it will take time to teach but should help him develop self-control, but while he is still learning Leave It use the Bite Inhibition method since that method can be used right away. Puppy biting is normal at this age and will take time to stop. Be patient and consistent, recognizing that you should see a gradual improvement instead of an instant fix. Puppies have to develop impulse control to improve and that takes time and practice. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Dante
Siberian Husky
5 Months
0 found helpful
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Dante
Siberian Husky
5 Months

Biting and dugging

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Nala
Siberian Husky
6 Months
0 found helpful
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Nala
Siberian Husky
6 Months

I’m watching my nephews dogs for a few weeks and discovered they do not get along. Is it possible to train the 6 month old husky to not bully and nip at the small adult chi-poo? We’ve read so far they should not be left unsupervised. Even supervised they don’t do well. The chi-poo want nothing to do with Nala.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cynthia, Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If one dog growl at the other, make the one who growled leave the room while also disciplining the other dog if they antagonized them first. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of the dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give the older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of Naya also give him a treat. Try not to let Maya see you rewarding him though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. If you have the time in terms of how long the dogs stay, Place is also another great command to teach pup. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Alex
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Alex
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks

I train Alex daily, take him for walks and runs (combined duration of walking and running is around 2 hour), I also play with him for at least 2 hours and take him in car rides still every time i leave him he starts howling, digging, and sometimes he cries.
How to solve the time consumption issue and the howling issue?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alexander, I highly suggest crate training. A crate will protect him during puppy destructiveness phases, give him the opportunity to learn good habits (like chewing on food stuffed chew toys), and prevent separation anxiety when done right. It can also help him learn to calm down and self-sooth. When you first introduce the crate there will be a few days of crying. This is normal. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below to help him learn to be quiet. Also feed him food stuffed chew toys in the crate. You can make several stuffed Kong's ahead of time. Put his dog food into a bowl and cover it with water, let it sit out until it turns into mush, mix a bit of peanut butter (NO Xylitol - it's toxic), or liver paste or cheese into the mush. Loosely stuff the Kong's with the mixture and freeze them. Grab one from the freezer when you put him into the crate for longer periods of time. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate As great as training, play time and exercise are it sounds like what is lacking is actually time for him to practice self-soothing and calmness - just like any other skill, puppies need opportunities to practice these things with guidance in order to improve at them. A crate is a safe way to practice them. Stay consistent and don't let puppy out when he cries unless you know he truly needs to go potty (even then try to to it let him out when he is barking, wait until he is quiet for a second first). If the whining continues past two weeks you can correct it using a small canister of unscented pressurized air, Pet Convincer, blown at his side through the crate, in combination with rewards for when he quiets down, but most young puppies just need time and consistency to adjust. I generally suggest giving it two weeks of ignoring the crying if you live somewhere where that's an option. After two weeks or if you live somewhere that you cannot let him cry, then I suggest correcting with something like the unscented air pet Convincer (do NOT use citronella) combined with treats when quiet. Only spray a small puff of air at his side and never his face. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
freya
Siberian Husky
8 Months
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
freya
Siberian Husky
8 Months

i can't get my 8 month old husky to stop biting and rough play, plus she jumps on every one. no matter what i have tried it doesn't work

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sean, Check out the video linked below that talks about jumping, mouthing, and being rough. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg I also suggest working on a Place command - where pup works up to being able to stay on Place for 1-2 hours to help build his impulse control and teach calmness. Place: https://youtu.be/omg5DVPWIWo Your attitude and energy while doing this should be calm and confident for pup to respond the best to the training. Expect that pup can do this and work him through the training by being consistent about new rules and expectations and calmly executing them. You will likely need to keep pup with you on a leash for a while when you are home (and crate while gone) so that you and effectively enforce the new boundaries for pup to help him learn. Mouthing and general ride behaviors often aren't true aggression. If you have seen or see true signs of aggression, with pup intending to truly harm you, seek professional help from a trainer who specializes in behavior issues and aggression and has a lot of experience - some of the training will still be the same, but additional safety measures and management, boundaries, and structure will also be needed Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nala
Siberian Husky
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Nala
Siberian Husky
2 Months

She is biting a lot ...

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Ibrahim, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method (which you are already essentially doing). BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class or puppy play group in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong to chew on and learn to self-entertain, for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jasper
Siberian Husky
6 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Jasper
Siberian Husky
6 Months

My puppy will not stop biting. Ive tried the scruff method and he doesnt like it. It makes him actually wanna bite me even more. Ive tried closing his muzzle and ive also tried commands. He will not budge. Im not sure what to do because ive been working on this since he was 4 months. Now its bad because his adult teeth hurt even more than his puppy teeth. I dont know what to do anymore and its really frustrating. Ive done the yelp and ignoring method and its not working either. Ive even pressed done on his jaw and it wont work. Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brenda, I suggest working on a few things to help him develop impulse control first: Leave It command from the Leave It method...Use this command to tell him to stop or not start biting once you have taught the command well - like the method outlines: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out command (which means leave the area), use this command to tell him to leave an area, especially kids' or guests' presence, when the temptation is too much for him. There is a section on teaching the Out command, follow that. There is also a section on using Out to deal with pushy behavior also follow that section once he understands the command, to make him whoever he is biting. If he is biting someone other than you, you can get between him and kids or guests and be the one to enforce it for them. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place command - have him work up to staying on Place for two hours. This is a good general command, teaches calmness and impulse control, and can help with management in general. This will take some time and practice, starting with just a couple of minutes on Place at first. https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ At this age the biting could be partially a respect issue too. Some dogs have a strong defense drive and when you apply physical pressure of any kind they will fight back against the pressure instead of submitting and stopping the behavior. It is especially important with these dogs to use methods that teach respect but teach it using body language, consistently, obedience commands, structure, and other things that teach the dog's mind - instead of just getting into a physical confrontation with them. It is also very important for the dog to understand why they are being disciplined and to have the skills to stop themselves. Working on commands like Out and Leave It - that help the dog understand what you are asking of them, and commands like Place, Leave It, and the additional commands I have linked below can help build the impulse control and respect too. Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Phantom
Siberian Husky
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Phantom
Siberian Husky
3 Months

Phantom always bites me, he bites ALOOTTT !!! I tried to grab him from his scruff and with a high pitch NO BITE! , he became more intense and bites even more!!!! I dont know what to do will this behavior will grow with him because he will get his adult teeth and it will be a serious problem!! Please help!!!!!!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mariam, First, know that the biting is completely normal and not normally a sign of future aggression at this age. Almost all puppies mouth - which is where they bite to learn about the world around them, learn how to control the pressure of their mouths, initiate play with other puppies, and sooth sore mouths. Before 5 months of age it's completely normal and even healthy. With that said you are not another puppy so biting can really hurt! And puppies do need to be taught not to bite humans before their jaws strengthen around 5 months of age. Check out the article linked below. Work on teaching the "Leave It" command from the :Leave It method - this will help pup learn self-control, which is important for stopping biting. This will take a bit to teach pup so practice frequently and try to stay as calm as possible when pup bites (easier said than done I know). Reacting with anger or excitement can actually get some puppies more excited or cause them to fight back if they don't understand what you are doing - that's why calmly working on something like Leave It is important. Once pup understands Leave It and can do that well, then you can also use the Pressure method found in the same article as a follow-through if you tell pup to "Leave It" and they disobey and continue biting. It's important for the Leave It command to be taught and practiced before using the Pressure method though - so pup doesn't just think you are playing. I suggest working on a few things to help him develop impulse control first: Leave It command from the Leave It method...Use this command to tell him to stop or not start biting once you have taught the command well - like the method outlines: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another good command to teach is Out - which means leave the area. This command is good for when the temptation to bite just seems like too much for pup and they need to walk away completely to calm down. This is also a good command to use if there are kids in the house. You can enforce the command for them by getting between them and pup and walking pup out of the room like the "How to Use Out to Deal with Pushiness" section deals with in that article. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Many puppies also get really wound up when over-tired (sort of like a toddler having a tantrum). When pup just can't seem to calm down they may actually need a rest time. I suggest crating them with a dog-food stuffed Kong chew toy for a bit during these times. A puppies may also get really wound up if they haven't been mentally or physically stimulated yet that day (such as a training session or focused walk). Puppies generally learn to control the pressure of their bites - called Bite Inhibition, by playing with other puppies while young. I highly suggest enrolling puppy in a puppy class or puppy play group where they can have time to play with other, off-leash puppies in a clean, secure area. Check out the article linked below for tips on when to go and what to look for in a class - many large pet stores also offer free puppy play groups. Call around and see if there is one in your area if you don't want to sign up for an entire class. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Finally, I suggest beginning to teach a Place command (which is like go to your bed). This will be a long-term goal. Start with teaching pup how to stay on their Place for just a couple of minutes, and over the next few months work up to staying on Place for two hours even when there are distractions like guests. Place can make life with a dog a lot calmer and give you a great management tool for times when pup gets really excited or rough. It also helps pup learn calmness and impulse control. https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Koda
Husky
9 Weeks
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Koda
Husky
9 Weeks

We got a puppy husky, Koda, while we already have a 3 year old Shitzu, Mochi. Koda likes to pounce on Mochi, however, Mochi doesn’t seem to enjoy it and will bark back at Koda and sometimes she’ll chase him away barking. We’re afraid it’s aggressive and we try to tell Koda not to pounce on Mochi.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rex, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once pup is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup for antagonizing if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm her. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup and because of his age it’s harder for her to handle him and keep up with his energy. She needs to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from him pestering her, and making his appearance pleasant for your older dog. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then she may adjust to puppy's presence as he grows, especially when he calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later! But they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. I find that about half of all older dogs find new puppies stressful at first. Many do adjust as puppy matures though and may even become buddies - you have to add structure and boundaries to help their relationship be calmer and not force interactions though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Akira
Siberian Husky
8 Months
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Akira
Siberian Husky
8 Months

We have a 3 year old, Male, husky/lab dog. He is very well behaved and is fairly submissive towards other dogs, mostly because he has not been exposed to other dogs from bad previous experiences. We decided to get another dog, female, Siberian Husky, she is 8 months old. The person we got her from said she was potty trained, crate trained and could do all kinds of tricks. So far we have only seen her use the house as her personal toilet and bite our other dogs neck roughly while outside. We are working on the potty training but not sure how to handle the biting towards our other dog.

Also on a side note, our other dog has stopped eating food after the new dog came. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Terry, First, it's important to determine what was going on when the biting happened. Some dogs will mock-bite when playing and rough housing. That type of biting, although not always wanted, isn't necessarily aggression. There will be no bite marks after, and there will be other signs of play like a play bow, relaxed, happy body language, or trying to get your dog to chase her. When that's the case, working on more structured obedience can help, such as Out, Place, Leave It, and Quiet. Teaching her to be calmer using those commands and following through consistently with them can help set a calmer tone in general for your household - it can also help reduce your other dog's stress. Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark If the biting was more aggressive in nature, then it's time to hire a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issue and aggression to come to your home and work with you and the dogs in person. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Apollo
Siberian Husky
2 Months
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Apollo
Siberian Husky
2 Months

Hello,
We have a 2 month old husky that is having a difficult time with mouthing us. We have tried settle and redirection. Sometimes when I try to settle him he gets worse and more wound up. Help!!!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Very cute! Apollo is a breed that will need a lot of exercise every day. Lots and lots of walks, games of fetch and ball. He'll need the energy burned off all of the time! https://wagwalking.com/breed/siberian-husky. I suggest starting to train Apollo right away: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-husky-puppy/. All of the training methods are good. He'll need interactive toys and puzzles to challenge his brain, too, as he is from the lineage of a working dog. When walking him, train him to heel as described in the Turns Method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel/. This serves two purposes in that you use up some of his energy by having him focus and work, and he starts to learn that he needs to listen and obey. Be firm, don't let Apollo become dominant. That is where puppy obedience classes will come in handy. Good luck and have fun!

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lily
Husky
8 Months
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lily
Husky
8 Months

she bites me all day , jump all over people , doesn’t listen

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sandra, If the biting is rude, playful biting for attention, and not aggressive in nature, check out the articles linked below. If the biting is aggressive, I suggest hiring a professional trainer to work with you in person. Always take precautions with true aggression to ensure the safety of everyone involved. Step Toward method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Listening: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Oliver
Husky
2 Months
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Oliver
Husky
2 Months

He bites too much and I can’t control him

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Oliver is the cutest! Thanks for the question. The truth about puppies is, puppies love to bite. Especially at the age of Oliver when they may be teething. Does Oliver have teething toys? If not, invest in sturdy, good quality toys to soothe the gums. When Oliver attempts to bite, distract him with a toy. Do not get angry with him because the behavior is normal. This is a great article on how to curb biting: https://peachonaleash.com/puppy-biting-whats-normal-whats-not-and-how-to-curb-it/ Remember, Huskies are very energetic dogs who need a LOT of exercise. Make sure that Oliver is getting what he needs and you may find that tiring him out helps. As well, do not leave Oliver unattended with children. Kids may not know how to handle the temporary biting stage that Oliver is going through. Good luck!

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Loki
Siberian Husky
5 Months
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Loki
Siberian Husky
5 Months

My dog is always biting me and my family. And I'm afraid that when I go back to school, he will make a big mess in the house.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jesse, Pup needs to be crate trained and crated when no one is home at this age. Crating pup keeps pup from chewing and swallowing dangerous things, reinforces good potty training habits, prevents pup from developing long-term destructive chewing habits, prevents the habit of barking out the window (if you don't set the crate up there), prepares pup for travel and boarding later in life, and if done correctly - can prevent future separation anxiety. Go ahead and start crate training now in preparation! The longer you wait, the more protesting their will be from pup probably. Starting now will let you ease pup into it before school and deal with any issues that arrive before then. It's also important once pup is used to the crate, to practice leaving pup home alone in the crate, to prepare them for time alone later. You can do this by just going for 30-60 minute walks without pup, to the grocery store without them, ect... To introduce the crate, first, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate There will be crying in the crate - it's completely normal, and pup needs time to adjust. You can either ignore the crying for the next two weeks, or go straight to what I suggest below. If pup isn't crying less within two weeks, I suggest following the method below either way. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. For the biting, check out the article linked below and teach the Leave It command. Leave It command: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also suggest teaching pup the Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Jumping - Step Toward method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump At this age, pup is most likely biting to get your attention and play., and the issue is pup lacking manners and self-control - in which case I suggest Leave It, Out, and the Step Toward method. If the biting seems aggressive in nature, I suggest hiring a professional trainer with a lot of experience with aggression to help you in person though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Loki
Siberian Husky
5 Months
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Loki
Siberian Husky
5 Months

My dog keeps eating rocks and mulch from our backyard. He eats other stuff too and we never know if he will throw it up or poop it out.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jesse, First, I would speak to your vet and make sure there isn't an underlying medical cause that's leading to pup eating non-food items like the rocks. This can have underlying health causes sometimes. (I am not a vet). This is definitely more common with a puppy than an adult dog though, so it may just be for entertainment. Supervise pup carefully while outside - at this age pup shouldn't just be left unattended in the backyard. Teach pup the Leave It command, reward when pup obeys and leaves the items alone, and use spray a small puff of air from the pet convincer at pup's side whenever they try to eat the items after you have said "Leave It" and they know that command and are choosing to ignore it. Only use unscented air canisters and only spray pup on the side and no the face. Leave It method for teaching Leave It command: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Keep pup on a 6 foot or 20 foot long leash while outside with them so that they can't play keep away with the items and you can enforce them leaving them alone. Second, make sure pup has interesting things to do during the day, such as work to get food out of a food stuffed chew toy, learn new things in training sessions, and play games with you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Daisy
Siberian Husky
1 Year
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Daisy
Siberian Husky
1 Year

I found Daisy in the streets about 1 month ago, she looks to be a year old the vet says. She is great she poops and pees on cue, however, she bites all the time. I know she has been abused out in the streets, but I am lost because positive reinforcement does not work at all. I don't know how hard I should be with her or how easy? please help

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Daisy (and you) will benefit from going to obedience training classes. I would start classes as soon as possible. Taking Daisy to experience the environment of other dogs, people, structure, and focus will give her the tools she needs to refrain from biting. Dogs like to have a sense of leadership for guidance but Huskies are of the dominant type and do need consistent training from a confident pet parent - so the classes will teach you what you need to know as well. Knowing important commands like sit, stay, leave it, and down are essential to a dog's happiness and safety. The mental stimulation of classes is good for a Husky, too. Remember that this breed is highly energetic. If Daisy does not get a long walk daily along with other forms of exercise like fetch to tire her out, she may react by biting as a way to release the frustration of pent-up energy. Walk her often, stimulate her mind, and take her to training. Do that, and I think you will soon see a different dog. Good luck!

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Zeus
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks
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Zeus
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks

Whenever someone someone who lives in the household picks him up to cuddle or to take him out he growls which isn’t a good sign to us. He also play bites a lot whenever we’ve tried to ouch method he lets go but goes back in again. We are all so active in the family so we take him out to play and exercise but nothing’s working with the bad temper

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Yixssya, Work on getting puppy used to touch and handling. Use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Also, teach family members how to be gentle with him and make touch a positive experience for him so that they don't accidentally teach him fear aggression. Have kids practice feeding treats and gently touching him daily - and teach them not to pick him up or hold him tightly when not working with you to make it a good experience for him. Continue to use the "Ouch" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method in the article I have linked below. As soon as pup is good at the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the Ouch method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Finally, teach pup some commands that increase calmness and make giving pup instructions easier. Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Know that teaching a puppy not to bite takes several weeks to a couple of months, and that's normal. The main goal is for pup to learn by the time they reach 4/5 months - when their jaws begin to get stronger. You should be seeing progress but it may be a gradual progression, it's partially developmental, so keep at it! Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ivaan
Husky
1 Month
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Ivaan
Husky
1 Month

How to make him not bite us

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sanay, First at 4 weeks old, you will need to be super patient with pup. That is a full month younger than when most puppies are ready to go home with a new family and things like bite inhibition should still be taught to pup by playing with his litter mates. You will have to compensate for the loss of that if you don't have the rest of the puppies there also. Sometimes puppies have to go home early due to rejection from mom, ect...but just know that at 4 weeks this is completely normal developmentally for pup to bite a lot! First, if you can find a free puppy play date class, attend one of those with him as soon as he is old enough so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Check out the article linked below for what to look for and precautions you can take before pup has finished their shot series. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. Once pup is at least three months old (don't expect to use this yet - it's too soon. You will use the bite inhibition method for the next 1-2 months at least), if he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Make sure pup has good and durable teething toys, like the puppy kongs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Husky
7 Months
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Luna
Husky
7 Months

My husky is constantly biting and taking away everything from my poodle, toys and food. What can I do?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Luna has a beautiful coat! Firstly, Huskies need a LOT of exercise and mental stimulation. Provide her with both and she may be nicer and more calm around home. So to start, take her for long walks every day. Next, buy her interactive toys that give her brain a workout. An interactive feeder may keep her busy for awhile - you can even feed her one of her daily meals that way. Obedience training is essential with any dog but especially the Husky. Take her to training classes and she'll learn how to listen to you. as well, try some of these training exercises: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you (The Consistency Method is a good start.) And this one too! https://wagwalking.com/training/not-eat-other-dogs-food All the best!

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Yoki
Husky
Four Months
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Yoki
Husky
Four Months

I have a husky puppy that my wife and I got when he was eleven weeks. The puppy really doesn’t bite me but he acts as though he is trying to dominate my wife all the time especially when I am at work. He is constantly trying to bite her and bark at her just wondering what I should do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicholas, First, have her practice the Working and Consistency methods with him to gently build his respect for her. Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Have her work on teaching him the Quiet command also. Quiet command: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Finally, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good at the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lobo
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks
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Lobo
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks

Hello my name is Angelica. I bought my puppy when he was a baby about 4 weeks and he has been growing ever since. He has the tendency to bite and we have tried every method but he has sunk his little teeth and has caused my daughter to have scratch marks all over her hand. He is always bitting us when we want to pet him or play with him and it is really frustrating. Please let us know what we can do. Thank you!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Yes, this is for certain a problem that you want to take care of. Lobo may have been teething when he started the behavior and now it's a habit. Look at the Redirection Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite. Can you play with a toy with Lobo when interacting? How much exercise is he getting? This breed of dog is very energetic and will only get more so as he grows. Keep him busy mentally with interactive toys and physically with lots of walks, and games of fetch. Check with your vet to see how soon you can take Lobo to dog training classes, which will be excellent for him. Start working on commands now - he's old enough and doing so will instill respect and obedience: Take a look here to start: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-husky-puppy. Good luck and happy training!

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Remmie
Siberin husky
1 Month
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Remmie
Siberin husky
1 Month

So if they already bite you what should you do keep them or get rid of them.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Ber
Husky
10 Weeks
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Ber
Husky
10 Weeks

When my pup nips and/or mouths should I just continue with verbal command or smack on the nose.?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I am always a fan of the verbal commands. Take a look here at the Bite Inhibition Method and the Leave It Method, which are both good for deterring biters. Ber is at the teething age as well. Make sure that you but a lot of puppy teething toys, made from different textures. Give your pup lots of exercise - the Husky is a working breed and will have tons of energy that needs to be expended. That may help with the biting, too. Good luck!

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Koko
Siberian Husky
11 Months
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Koko
Siberian Husky
11 Months

As soon as my children go to bed my dog decides she doesn’t like me anymore! She barks at me growls at me bites me. I try playing with her and stroking her but she just gets more aggressive. Whether I’m stood up, sat down or doing something else she just doesn’t stop. She’s not like this with my children or husband just me

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Zuki
Siberian Husky
6 Weeks
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Zuki
Siberian Husky
6 Weeks

Hi,
We recently got husky puppy and we are facing the challenge of his biting a lot. We tried different methods but he persists. Kindly suggest. Also his nails are too sharp anyway to blunt them?

Thanks
Sneha

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! As he ages, this issues will slowly start to disappear. But in the mean time, here is some information to help you so it doesn't become a habit that follows him into adulthood. Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. As far as his nails, groomers often do free puppy trims to show you how to maintain them. Check with a local groomer. They can file or simply clip. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Brad
Husky
2 Months
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Brad
Husky
2 Months

How to Train a Husky Puppy to do tricks, to not poop or pee inside the house and to behave properly.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you information on potty training and crate training if you decide to use a crate to help with potty training. You will want to spend a few weeks practicing the advice, and you should see a quick turnaround. As far as tricks and overall behavior, you can google how to teach certain training commands. Teaching about one command per week will really help him become a well rounded dog as he matures. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Lily
Husky
7 Weeks
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Lily
Husky
7 Weeks

She is bitting none stop and I have tried most methods with no results

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Blu
Siberian Husky
1 Year
0 found helpful
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Blu
Siberian Husky
1 Year

How do I get him to stop trying to snap at me??

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Teena, The answer to your question depends a lot on pup's history and when and why they are snapping at you. I would need a bit more information to help here. Pup might be reacting fearfully and the underlying fear needs to be addressed. Pup may lack respect for you and that needs to be carefully build. Pup may be resource guarding something and a protocol for addressing resource guarding done. Pup could be treating you like another dog and trying to play - and pup needs more structure and some obedience work to learn more self-control. How aggression is treated depends a lot on the source of it, and often there is more than one type present so a couple different approaches are needed together. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kailani
husky malamute
3 Months
0 found helpful
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Kailani
husky malamute
3 Months

She’s always biting my 4 year old son gets aggressive with my husband when he comes near me and barks and cries as well as howls every time I walk out the door

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I suggest you get a trainer to work with Kailani right away. The biting of your son and the aggression with your husband cannot go on and may escalate into a worse situation. Have your husband do some of the feeding (or all of it) and as well, your husband needs to take Kailani on walks so that they form a better relationship. It seems that Kailani may not respect him. As well, there is a separation anxiety issue perhaps developing but I think that if the first problem is dealt with, the rest will fall into place. But you need to involve a trainer used to working with dogs with aggression. Husky's can also be very headstrong, so I feel that having a professional give you the tools to work with is essential. Don't delay and good luck!

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Balto
Husky
14 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Balto
Husky
14 Weeks

Hi! So, I have a husky puppy that bites a lot, and I mean a lot. When he's excited to see me, bites. When he's relaxed and laying down and I go to pet him, bites. When my toddler cousins try petting him, bites! And only 40% of the time it's light nipping. I have cuts all over my arms from his biting. It's out of control. I've tried every method that I've seen out there and none of it helps at all, it only causes him to want to bite me even more. To be more specific of the methods I've tried, I've blown on his face, yelled ouch when he would bite too hard, light nose tapping, etc. It just makes him bite even more. It's extremely frustrating trying to lay with him or do anything with him with all the biting. The biting is so out of control, I've considered giving him away and I truly don't want to do that. And I can't afford to take him to a professional trainer.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lilia, Check out the article linked below. Follow the Leave It method - this is going to take a bit to teach him and build his self-control. Don't give up yet. Practice daily, or even several times a day for short sessions. Once he knows Leave It, use Leave It and Out to stop the biting. Right now pup probably thinks you are rough housing with what you have tried so far - which is why he gets even more excited. He needs to practice things that build his self-control and ability to calm himself. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Once pup knows Leave It and and Out well, use leave it when he bites or looks like he is thinking about biting. When pup keeps going back to biting and the temptation seems too much, use Out and make him leave the area completely (Out means get out of the area). Puppies also tend to bite more when overtired or if they haven't had mental stimulation. Practicing regular training sessions will help tire pup out even more than physical exercise by itself in most cases. It's estimated to be twice as tiring when mental exercise is paired with physical exercise - so teach pup other commands too to take the edge off his energy and promote calmness. Give pup dog food stuffed chew toys to provide a chewing outlet in general - especially during calm times in the crate or when interacting with him so that he has something good in his mouth other than your arm. When pup gets too wound up, put him in a crate or exercise pen with a dog food stuffed chew toy to rest - pup probably needs a break. Puppies tend to get really wound up like over tired toddlers when they need a break. Finally, check out the free PDF e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy from the link below, as well as the videos of a puppy class I have linked below that. Those resources should help in general with training pup on your own from home. If you have friends with puppies, invite them over and practice the videos together to give the pups the socialization of other people and puppy play - puppy play can also help the biting when the play is moderated to prevent bullying in the group - i.e separate puppies for a few minutes to let them calm down whenever one seems to want a break and another isn't allowing it. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Charlie
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Charlie
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks

I just need some advice to teach my puppy not to bite, Thats all he wants to do, I’ve tried to replace my skin with toys but he still wants to bite and his teeth are super sharp

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, the concepts in this guide work quite well for training a puppy to not bite: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. Take a look at the Leave It Method and practice it with Charlie. You will find that this command can be used in many other circumstances, such as avoiding Charlie eating garbage when out for a walk etc. This will take practice. His biting habit may not change overnight. Charlie is a breed that requires a lot of physical stimulation in the form of walks and even runs, daily. Engage him in games of fetch in the yard and walk him again. Enrolling him in dog training will be essential so that he learns to obey and not take a dominant stance. He'll be headstrong but will thrive on the opportunity to train and use his brain. As for his toys, buy him interactive toys that require some thinking and a challenge - interactive feeders are great for that. You can give him half of his meal in the morning and the other half through the challenge of the feeder toy. Lots and lots of exercise for Charlie and look at the Leave It Method also. Good luck!

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Lily
Miniature Husky
9 Months
0 found helpful
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Lily
Miniature Husky
9 Months

Im trying to get her to go potty outside. I have trained her to use pads in the house. I put her outside and she will wait to come back in and use the pad,I ha I pick up the pads then she will go on the floor.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! When issues with potty training arise (either because of a transition or change of some sort) it is best to completely start over. So I am going to give you fresh advice on potty training. Some of it you may know already. Basically you want to start over with a routine of going out at certain times during the day, and do not give her an opportunity to go in the house. So this means you may have to confine her until she gets it. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior.

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Glacier
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks
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Glacier
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks

How to I get him to stop bitting & chewing everything?

I’ve done everything the online training said to do, I’ve got him tons of toys, I’ve disciplined him, & been firm. I’ve done the ouch thing, the no bitting, the muzzle & neck thing. It’s just getting to the point that he’s chewing everything up, even the muzzle that I put on his face, and bitting people hard to draw blood almost.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, by the description you have given, you have tried every method I would have suggested. The fact that he is biting almost to draw blood seems like it may be an aggression issue. He is old enough to be beyond the puppy biting/teething stage. I strongly suggest that you consult a trainer in person, and if not possible, then online, for a consult on Glacier's behavior. I assume that dog training classes have not yet been attended due to his age - you can look into that as well. He definitely needs direction now, before he gets bigger and older. How much exercise does he get? Glacier is a very active breed that will require hour-long walks on a daily basis - walks that include runs and sessions at a fenced in dog park where he can run freely and burn off steam. But importantly, he needs mental stimulation and dog training lessons so that he knows his place and how to behave. Please consult a trainer and in the meantime, start working on his commands at home: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-great-dane. Take him on a long walk and then spend 20 minutes daily in training sessions. End on a high note and reward him for success. Good luck!

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Ash
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks
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Ash
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks

He bites everyone in the house when he gets too excited. Even when you're walking he will suddenly bite you. Well in short he bites nonstop, I tried giving him toys but still he will try biting me rather than the toy. HOOOW CAN I STOP

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Snow
Husky
3 Months
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Snow
Husky
3 Months

He keeps biting any and everything in sight including humans.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Barney
Siberian Husky
3 Months
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Barney
Siberian Husky
3 Months

Toilet and Potty train on Training Mat how to do it.

Also,he is screaming at night how to control

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I have an excellent guide for potty training. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Read the entire guide and choose a method that you can work with, such as the Timing Method. Take Barney out every 30 minutes for a pee break. This may seem excessive, but once he gets the idea it will have been worth it. Always take him immediately upon waking, after a meal, after a nap, and after playtime - common times that a potty break is needed. Clean up any messes inside with an enzymatic cleaner as this is the only thing to remove the smell. To train Barney to pee inside (this is temporary as he will be a big dog and need outdoor exercise), try the Exercise Pen Method here, using a real grass pad which then helps him to transition outside more easily: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. As for the crying at night, it is often quickest to let them cry it out for a few nights - or weeks. If Barney is in a crate, make the crate more appealing as shown here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. Remember to take Barney on lengthy walks before bed. His breed is an energetic one and he will need a couple of walks a day along with exercise and socialization at an enclosed dog park. Obedience training will tire him out as well, so be sure to add that to his mental and physical stimulation opportunities. Good luck!

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Spark
Siberian Husky
1 Year
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Spark
Siberian Husky
1 Year

Do huskies bite and pkqy with other dogs naturally

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi. If the dog has been socialized properly, they will be very playful. Dogs "mouth" eachother while playing. It can appear to look like a bite, but if they are running around and wrestling with eachother, you can be assured that they are just mouthing in a playful manner.

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Simba
Husky
5 Months
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Simba
Husky
5 Months

He has bitting problems, whenever I touch him he starts to bite

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Chaturanan, First, if you are using any methods that involve physical roughness with your hands, then I would switch to a different method because that could be related for some pups. I recommend getting puppy used to touch and handling and teaching Leave It. Use puppy’s daily meal kibble to do the touch desensitization. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cody
Siberian Husky
3 Months
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Cody
Siberian Husky
3 Months

He is biking constantly and gets into everything he dominates my boyfriend and I and when he doesn't get his way he pees in the house on purpose

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you some information on nipping/biting. If you adapt the methods and the mindset below, that should also help with the acting out that he is doing as well. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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ace
sibrian husky
1 Month
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ace
sibrian husky
1 Month

I am trying to get her to go to the bathroom outside but she keeps going inside

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you quite a bit of information on potty training and using the crate to aid in that process. Some of it you may know already, but somewhere in the info, you may see something that you missed. Hi! I am going to send you information on both potty training and crate training should you decide to utilize a crate to aid in potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Loki
Husky
4 Months
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Loki
Husky
4 Months

my sister has a 4 month old husky. He is a very good dog and for the most part listens. He does have an issue with biting. We are doing the no bit, yelping, and we've done the mama dog too. He is learning and we know it'll take time, he's only 4 months. The thing is tonight he got excited with our neighbor and started biting. Our neighbor went full on dominant with him. Held his muzzle closed,stuck her finger in his mouth, and even pinned him.
He didn't like that so much and started getting aggressive back. He was crying and winning the whole time she did this. In the end he gave up. I'm curious though, because we've read that if you are aggressive with a husky in training they will become aggressive toward you in return. Is this true? Tonight was just an over all shock to us all with how she tried to stop his behavior. Appreciate any advice you can give, thanks!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting. It is likely remedial as it sounds like you have tried most of the tips below. But I am hoping you will find something useful that you haven't tried. As far as Husky's in particular, they need TONS of exercise and mental stimulation. More than average. We often think one walk a day is enough for a dog. Any type of working breed needs heavy exercise and mental stimulation as well. It's amazing what those two things will do for their overall behavior. Investing in Kong toys, or buster balls will help. As well as spending 10-15 minutes per day going over training commands in a controlled setting. Working on the "nothing is for free" approach will help also. With this, he will need to do things like sit before meals, sit stay while you walk through doorways, sit before being let outside, etc. This is a very passive way to put the dog in it's place so to speak. Any dog has the potential to become aggressive if you are aggressive towards it. But you are correct with Husky's being a little more sensitive to imposed aggression. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Bella
Maltipoo Husky mix
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Bella
Maltipoo Husky mix
12 Weeks

My puppy likes to put her mouth on all of us and at night can become more aggressive in nature with her playing. Can you give me some advice as to how and l redirect that? She really seems to go after our 11 year old daughter.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some detailed information on nipping/mouthing Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Skye
Husky
6 Weeks
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Skye
Husky
6 Weeks

Biting, jumping to bite, nipping at ankles and biting pants and shirts

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Mandy and Chace
Sinerian Husk
11 Weeks
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Mandy and Chace
Sinerian Husk
11 Weeks

They bite each other a lot and end up fighting, but what it really concerned me is that they bite my 5 yr old a lot, he can be sitting down and they just go and bite his feet and hands. I really want to change that behavior so they can play and my son won’t be scared of them. Chace is 14 weeks old

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! They are so cute!!! While the nipping amongst themselves is fairly normal, it is NOT something that should continue, especially since there are two of them, and only one 5 year old. So as far as the pups go, it is best to let them sort it out on their own. Human interference often makes problems worse. They are figuring out their pecking order. If we step in and favor one (even if we don't mean to) it throws the balance off. So if you have to stop them, I would invest in something that makes a very loud noise or a squirt gun. An interruption that isn't directly coming from you is your best bet. Here is info on how to correct the nipping towards humans... Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Bleu
Siberian Husky
6 Months
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Bleu
Siberian Husky
6 Months

My husky is very mouthy and takes a few times to get to know someone before they can even touch him. He’s skiddish. He’s been in training and socialization classes with dogs and other people. He is very mouthy. He’s more mouthy with me, my fiancé, and my sister. We’ve been redirecting biting with a toy. Awarding when he’s playing with a toy instead of us. Sometimes when we’re outside we wants to jump and bite us. If I ignore, it makes him more angry where I would hear him growl. Today I tried holding his muzzle gently like the third method stated above. I feel hopeless. In his training class they really didn’t address this too much. Would you be able to give me some advice?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Nova
Siberian Husky
6 Weeks
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Nova
Siberian Husky
6 Weeks

My puppy bites on everything and everyone how can I stop her from doing this? I also need a way to potty train her she not allowed to go outside due to her not having all of her shots. Any tips or ideas?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Melaysia, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Out command from the second article linked below to make her leave the area as a consequence. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The Out method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just playing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area, is also a good command for you to use if pup bites the kids. Check out the section on Using Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior for how to calmly enforce that command once it's taught. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play once pup is a little older. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Once pup is a little older, an outside class may be best in a fenced area, or letting friends' pups play in someone's fence outside. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Practicing regular obedience commands or having pup earn what they get by performing commands like Sit and Down before feeding, petting, tossing a toy, opening the door for a walk, ect... can also help stimulate pup mentally to increase calmness and wear them out. Commands that practice focus, self-control, and learning something a bit new or harder than before can all tire out puppies. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ As far as potty training, as soon as pup is old enough to go outside, begin following the Crate Training article linked below for tips on how to get pup to go potty while outside. Crate training tends to be the easiest method for transitioning a dog from inside potty training to outside potty training later. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Until pup can be taken outside, use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold her bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so she won't go into there looking to pee, and take her potty outside only. Since she may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave her alone, be sure to leave her in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until she is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy When you are home, once pup is 8 weeks old and can hold their bladder for 45 minutes, you can also follow the tethering method from the article linked below when you want pup to be out of the crate. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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S"mores
West Siberian Laika
5 Months
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S"mores
West Siberian Laika
5 Months

S'mores is lovely and brilliant, but he bites aggressively- not just nipping, but aggressive nipping and can get very snippy when he is rejecting our discipline. He is a dominant dog, by nature, so he does require a more consistent and strong leadership from us- we have 2 young girl, 8 and 10 (nearly 11) who he treats alternatively with love and as prey. He is getting his adult teeth and we haven't successfully curbed this behavior yet. We have been to a puppy course (4 days) and 2 private lessons at the same center, but the methods they taught us were aggressive and I am certain that they have contributed to this escalation in S'mores aggression. Their advice was to limit exercise, no tug or fetch games, little stimulation other than calm teamwork games. However, he is a high energy breed and if we limit his exercise, he suffers and acts out. He listens very well and I have managed to teach him many commands successfully. The problem is that he doesn't stop nipping at our feet and any part he can reach, which HURTS, especially the kids, I am COVERED in bruises and scrapes from his bites and have started using a spray bottle to divert his attention, and a loud CHT! noise at the same time, which seems to work. My husband, however, still does what the trainers taught us- grab him fast on the side and put him on the ground, pinning him there until he submits. This is painful for S'mores and creates too much fear and anxiety in our family. It can't be right. Any other technique fails miserably, aside from just picking him up and removing him from the situation. Trying to calmly divert him in an assertive way, and trying to pin him, they all just escalate the situation. The water bottle works- for now- but it isn't sustainable either! PLEASE HELP!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michele, I don't recommend pinning, but I do recommend working on building pup's respect in other ways. I generally find that calmness and confidence paired with training methods that earn pup's confidence by challenging them mentally, having them work for everything in life, and giving clear boundaries and structure help most dogs. Check out the following commands and articles below. I recommend following all three methods from this article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you For the biting, continue with the yelping if you find that works, but also work on teaching pup the Leave It command, Out command - which means leave the area, and a Place command, to teach boundaries and build self-control. The section on how to deal with pushy behavior in the Out article is something you can do on behalf of your kids too, enforcing the rules for them so they don't always have to. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite The commands below are also good commands for building trust and respect, which I recommend working on. Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Come - Reel in method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Off- section on The Off command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-train-dog-stay-off-couch/ Crate manners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn5HTiryZN8 Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M I also wouldn't limit exercise. I would however incorporate obedience exercises into the exercise so that pup ends the walk or game more mentally tired instead of wound up. You can do that be having pup do a structured heel during walks, periodically practice Down, Sit, Stay, and Watch me. Having pup Sit Stay, Down, Come and practice similar commands during a game of fetch to help with self-control too. I would avoid tug right now while the biting is an issue, especially with the kids. Agility obstacles, walks, fetch, and anything that gets pup working with you and not directly challenging you are great. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kaya
Isabella husky
1 Year
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Kaya
Isabella husky
1 Year

When I play with her she will bite until she is done playing and no matter how much I try to hide my had she will always find it. How do I stop that?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Skye
Husky
7 Weeks
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Skye
Husky
7 Weeks

Skye will not stop attacking our 2 year old. I worry that she will really hurt him. Tonight she bit his hand pretty hard. He stays away from her cause he is actually afraid of her. I wanted them to grow up together and be pals. Now if he even walks across the room she attacks him.she is starting to do it to the older kids also.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (most of the time that will be puppy). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or hide. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. After pup has learned the Out command from the article linked below, you can use the section on How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior also found in that article to enforce pup giving kids and your older dog space. I would also work on the Leave It command from the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Puppies tend to learn how to control the pressure of their mouths best from other puppies, so if you have an opportunity to enroll pup in a kindergarten class or play group that has time for off-leash moderated puppy play, that can help pup learn to be gentler and apply less pressure too, which also makes them safer as an adult later. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Koda
Goberian
3 Months
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Koda
Goberian
3 Months

My puppy has a bit of a biting problem. I have tried the ouch method, but with no results. He will bite, than when you address it, he will try to bite you again. He gets riled up when you try to stop his biting habit. When can I do?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Budee
Husky Lab Border Collie
7 Months
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Budee
Husky Lab Border Collie
7 Months

How can i get him to go #2 while on the leash?? He goes pee perfectly fine on the leash but he will only poop inside on the floor. I live in an apartment and we only have a court yard without a gate :(

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! If your dog doesn't go poo for you when you take him out on leash, you will want to confine him with his food bowls in a small area. The purpose of putting him in that space with his food bowls is because dogs typically won't eliminate where they eat. Take him back outside on leash and repeat this until he finally goes for you outside. Make sure to give him lots of treats and praise when he goes. Repeat this process for a few days until he understands.

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Remy
Husky
8 Weeks
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Remy
Husky
8 Weeks

We are trying to get herand our two cats to get alone. They have already see each other and sniffed each other while the other was distracted so now what? Its just me and my sister who will be training her

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, good for you for starting the introductions early and carefully. Take these steps: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-cat and https://wagwalking.com/training/get-along-with-cats. It's important to make sure that your cat always has a safe haven to escape to where Remy cannot go. As well, start training Remy in obedience right away. This will be important so that he has a foundation of good behavior and knows how to respond when you ask for something. Start here for excellent tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-german-shepherd-puppy. Train Remy for 5-10 minutes a day. Use consistency and make sure that you and your sister are using the same methods and the same words to teach commands. Always end on a high note, meaning stop the training session before Remy loses interest and does not want to cooperate. Be sure to socialize him well. Once the vet gives the okay as far as vaccines, take him to meet other pups (maybe puppy training class) and continue to have him around other dogs every day so he gets used to all ages and sizes. Happy training!

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Luna
Siberian Husky
9 Months
0 found helpful
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Luna
Siberian Husky
9 Months

She like to play and bite, not heavy bite but very painful to kids. She bite the hands, legs, feet. etc...

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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zoro
Husky
4 Months
0 found helpful
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zoro
Husky
4 Months

get him to stop biting and jumping on people

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Kyla
Husky mix
2 Months
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Kyla
Husky mix
2 Months

My puppy does not listen. She bites us all the time and when saying no to her she growls and gets aggressive. She’s only 2 months old. How can I stop this ?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Lobo
Siberian Husky
4 Months
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Lobo
Siberian Husky
4 Months

He will bite and not lick, we taught him a little to lick but continues biting and wines if we try to carry him to calm down. He is hard to train for peeing in his pad, what should I do?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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luffy
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks
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luffy
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks

bites when he gets excited and pees and poos in the hallways.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Following this will be information on nipping. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Lucifer
Siberian Husky
2 Months
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Lucifer
Siberian Husky
2 Months

How do I get my husky to stop biting me and other people? I tried everything I've read online but nothing seems to be working. When I scold him he gets aggressive and tries to bite me. Normally he's fine but all of a sudden he gets aggressive ando it of control.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Thor
Husky
2 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Thor
Husky
2 Months

Biting everything and everyone tried multiple methods but he just continues

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Maxie
Siberian Husky
1 Year
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Maxie
Siberian Husky
1 Year

Maxie is a year and a half, so we were told. She is very "mouthy" nipping at hands and feet. She's a big dog and even though she isn't being aggressive, it can really hurt.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Judge
Husky
1 Year
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Judge
Husky
1 Year

He's growled several times at wife and daughters. Nipped at wife tonight while she was hugging his neck and scratching his head. Not even a Massey or scratch. But alarming.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Dan, I highly recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression to evaluate pup and their relationship with the family. There could be resource guarding going on. I suspect pup may have a bad association with certain types of touch like being hugged. There may be a lack of respect for the women in your family. One year is pup beginning to enter adulthood and mature sexually and mentally. It's often a time when aggression that was subtle and missed before, becoming obvious and leading to bites if not addressed. You need someone who can watch how pup responds to things, ask you questions about pup's history and temperament, and show you how to take safety measures and address the issues found with the right safety measures to avoid a bite. Avoid those who do things like dominance roles, but do look for those who come well recommended and understand things like arousal, thresholds, counter conditioning, and how to use obedience commands to build respect. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Enzo
Siberian Husky
4 Months
0 found helpful
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Enzo
Siberian Husky
4 Months

Myhusky bites me so hardly that the blood cameout of my hands,he is very aaaggressive
He did this so many
Times
I m so pissed off
Plz help.
Heis very selfish also
Don't listen to me
Plz help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Navya, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means move away: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. For the listening, check out this article below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bear
Siberian/Alaskan Husky
8 Weeks
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Bear
Siberian/Alaskan Husky
8 Weeks

Very hyper periods where he just doesn’t stop . The biting is getting out of hand. Tearing of pee pads and doing his job on the floor and not the pee pads.. he can be the sweetest puppy ever then turn into something completely different. Help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cheryl, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. For the hyper period, you may also be experiencing something called the Zoomies - where puppy races around like a madman to and fro. It's normal for puppies, although a bit tricky to deal with in the moment. I personally will encourage pup's to do zoomies outside in a fenced area, but work on self-control and being able to stop themselves when inside. I suggest practicing something called "Jazz up and Settle Down". Which is a bit like red light, green light for dogs. During training, get him a little excited, then command "Stop" or something he knows like "Sit", and freeze. Wait and completely ignore him until he calms back down. As soon as he gets calm or sits, praise and give a treat. Tell him "Let's Play!" again, and start playing and getting him a bit excited again. As soon as he starts to get a little worked up (not too much at first), command "Stop" or "Sit" again, then wait, reward with a treat when he calms down, then continue the game after he is rewarded. Repeat this a few times each training session, then end the session (have lots of frequent shorter sessions throughout the day at his age). As he improves, and can really calm down quickly, let him get a bit more excited before calling Stop. Gradually work up to him becoming more and more excited and having to calm down quickly from a higher level of excitement as he improves. Also, understand that this will take some time and practice. Puppies have to learn self-control just like any other skill, while young. This game can help him develop it sooner though. For the shredding of pee pads, you have a couple of options. First, I suggest teaching the Leave It command from the article linked below. This command can also help with the periods of excitement and biting, as well as chewing other things too. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Second, since pup is a larger breed who I am guessing will eventually be transitioning to only pottying outside, I would strongly consider replacing the pee pads with disposable real grass pads. Not only is pup less likely to shred those but the use of those instead of pee pads also means pup is less likely to confuse your area rugs and carpet with pee pads later on, and the transition to outside potty training could go a lot easier if you have been using grass pads. www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Third, whether you use pee pads or grass pads, you can use the Crate Training method from the article I have linked below to teach pup to use the pads, commanding leave it while you are with pup, to teach pup not to chew on the pads. This method limits pup's access to the pee pads to times when you are there to teach, so they aren't just chewing the pads to pass the time. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If you are gone all day so can't supervise to teach pup, I would try switching to grass pads and use the Exercise Pen method from this article, since you won't be able to supervise in that case. Initially, I would use extra grass pads to cover the entire exercise pen area with grass, leaving a non-absorbent bed in there also, like www.primopads.com or k9ballistics.com crate mats. Don't leave anything absorbent like a soft bed or towel in the pen or crate at this age though. Once pup is used to going potty on the grass, then you can then gradually remove the extra grass pads, until pup is going potty on just the one in the pen. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rasta
Pitsky
2 Months
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Rasta
Pitsky
2 Months

I am having issues with him nipping and biting but he seems so serious and aggressive with his facial expressions and showing his teeth before biting. Does this indicate an overly aggressive dog?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Not necessarily but it is good to get him out of the habit before it becomes a bigger problem. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Training Success Stories

Success
Darling
Labradoodle
3 Months

Darling used to pee in the house all of the time!!! But now she is well trained and goes outside to potty.

1 year ago
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